#1
Death metal bass characteristics, what are they? Other than the obvious down-tuned and distorted guitars and high BPM, of course.

I mean scales and keys, time sigs and rhythm, muting and triplets, etc. etc.
#4
well, the time signature often changes between riffs and lots of phrases are palm muted. the scales are almost always minor or an exotic sounding scale like phrygian dominant and the rhythm changes between every song.

i like to write death metal using complex melodies and a heavy rhythm beneath it, using the minor scale with a few bars of harmonic minor, and diminished7 arpeggios. for the bass i like to have them playing lines based on the rhythm sections, but on stronger beats playing a minor third from the 5th interval chord hat the guitarist would be playing, eg. the guitarist would play D5 and the bassist would play an F

with solos i always use the same rhythm as for the verse/ chorus/ hook/ any other riff from the song underneath it, as well as the same scale that i would have used over it. this makes sure that the solo sounds like it fits in the song - bands like necrophagist don't have good solos in my opinion because the tempo often changes to something way slower and to a standard 4/4 rhythm. alot of death metal bands also like to make good use of technical skills such as really fast alternate/sweep picking towards the end of a solo to give you that little rush.

hope this helped

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#5
Quote by metallicafan616
well, the time signature often changes between riffs and lots of phrases are palm muted. the scales are almost always minor or an exotic sounding scale like phrygian dominant and the rhythm changes between every song.

i like to write death metal using complex melodies and a heavy rhythm beneath it, using the minor scale with a few bars of harmonic minor, and diminished7 arpeggios. for the bass i like to have them playing lines based on the rhythm sections, but on stronger beats playing a minor third from the 5th interval chord hat the guitarist would be playing, eg. the guitarist would play D5 and the bassist would play an F

with solos i always use the same rhythm as for the verse/ chorus/ hook/ any other riff from the song underneath it, as well as the same scale that i would have used over it. this makes sure that the solo sounds like it fits in the song - bands like necrophagist don't have good solos in my opinion because the tempo often changes to something way slower and to a standard 4/4 rhythm. alot of death metal bands also like to make good use of technical skills such as really fast alternate/sweep picking towards the end of a solo to give you that little rush.

hope this helped

Yeah, thanks a lot. That did help, although I do have a few questions...

What is a:

Phrygian Dominant (I know what Phyr. is, but not Dominant)

harmonic minor?

diminshed7?

D5?
Last edited by Royal Celebi at Oct 11, 2008,
#6
Quote by Royal Celebi
Yeah, thanks a lot. That did help, although I do have a few questions...

What is a:

harmonic minor?

diminshed7?

D5?


harmonic minor is a minor scale with a major seventh, so A harmonic minor would be A B C D E F G# whereas A minor is just A B C D E F G

phrygian dominant is a mode of the harmonic minor scale , i think it is spelled 1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7, so it has a flat 2nd, 6th and 7th a major third and a perfect 4th and 5th in relation to the major sclae

diminished is an arpeggio with a root note (of course )a minor3rd and a flat 'diminished' 5th so it could be A C Eb

7th means it has a major seventh before the octave, so A diminished7th would be A Cb E Gb A.

because that wouldnt fit into A minor or A harmonic minor most guitarists would start it on the 2nd - spelling out B D F G# which fits perfectly into A harmonic minor with A B C D E F G# A



D5 is alot simpler, it is simply a powerchord, it uses a root note, D in this case, and the perfect 5th from its scale, an A in this case

red color = complicated, dont quote me on tthat

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
Last edited by metallicafan616 at Oct 11, 2008,
#7
Quote by metallicafan616
harmonic minor is a minor scale with a major seventh, so A harmonic minor would be A B C D E F G# whereas A minor is just A B C D E F G

phrygian dominant is a mode of the harmonic minor scale , i think it is spelled 1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7, so it has a flat 2nd, 6th and 7th a major third and a perfect 4th and 5th in relation to the major sclae

diminished is an arpeggio with a root note (of course )a minor3rd and a flat 'diminished' 5th so it could be A C Eb

7th means it has a major seventh before the octave, so A diminished7th would be A Cb E Gb A.

because that wouldnt fit into A minor or A harmonic minor most guitarists would start it on the 2nd - spelling out B D F G# which fits perfectly into A harmonic minor with A B C D E F G# A



D5 is alot simpler, it is simply a powerchord, it uses a root note, D in this case, and the perfect 5th from its scale, an A in this case

red color = complicated, dont quote me on tthat



Ahhh. Thank you so much, that explains a lot. Feel free to add if needed.
#8
Uhhh, learn your dimnished (symmetrical) scales too. You hear it alot in both riffs and solos.
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#9
Quote by ramm_ty
Uhhh, learn your dimnished (symmetrical) scales too. You hear it alot in both riffs and solos.

Diminished scales...by that you mean diminished arpeggios for each root note?
#10
Negative, I mean Whole-Half and Half-Whole symmetrical scales.

For a whole-half: start with a root; next note is a whole step away; next after that is a half step away; then another whole step, followed by a half step. In other words, you alternate between whole steps and half steps seperating the notes.

Half whole is built in the same way, except you start with a half step (if you haven't guessed)

Anyway, you end up with an 8 note scale in both cases.
Quote by TGautier13
Because e-cred on a sub-par 4Chan knockoff forum is what everyone strives to achieve.
We believe - so we're misled
We assume - so we're played
We confide - so we're deceived
We trust - so we're betrayed
Last edited by ramm_ty at Oct 11, 2008,
#11
Quote by ramm_ty
Negative, I mean Whole-Half and Half-Whole symmetrical scales.

For a whole-half: start with a root; next note is a whole step away; next after that is a half step away; then another whole step, followed by a half step. In other words, you alternate between whole steps and half steps seperating the notes.

Half whole is built in the same way, except you start with a half step (if you haven't guessed)

Anyway, you end up with an 8 note scale in both cases.


i cant really imagine them being used very often, it lacks the notes to make a complex riff or a good rhythm. it also sounds to 'happy' instead of dark or sad which death metal needs for its sound

EDIT: i just reread it, let me see what the scale actually sounds like

EDIT TWO: ooh, those are pretty damn dark, im gonna try use those scales in my riffs!

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
Last edited by metallicafan616 at Oct 12, 2008,
#12
Quote by ramm_ty
Negative, I mean Whole-Half and Half-Whole symmetrical scales.

For a whole-half: start with a root; next note is a whole step away; next after that is a half step away; then another whole step, followed by a half step. In other words, you alternate between whole steps and half steps seperating the notes.

Half whole is built in the same way, except you start with a half step (if you haven't guessed)

Anyway, you end up with an 8 note scale in both cases.

Alright thanks a lot.

Thanks to everyone, I've learned a lot so far. I'll test these things out eventually.