#1
Okay, I am guitar accompaniment for my choir.
I jave to do Battle Hymn of the Republic in the key of D and God Bless america in the key of G.
Does this mean I have to tune it diffrently, or do I just play the shet music as it's written in standard tuning?
I need this, like NOW because I have to get both songs done perfectly by the 30th and it takes me a while to master a song flawlessly.
#2
Keys refer to the root notes. You don't have to change your tuning, just in what position you play a scale/what chords you resolve on.

Read some of the lessons on the main UG site refering to scales and keys. They'll be able to give you all the info you need.
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#3
No you shouldn't need to change tuning, you'd just play in different keys.
#4
Nah, you don't have to tune it differently - it's just like the scale that it's in. Like if it's in G then the main chord in the song, or what the song is based around is the note G. Someone else will probably explain it better, but no - you don't have to tune it differently. Take the song "American Pie" by Don McLean - that's in a G scale. It's got a major sound. But on the other hand, a song in E-minor will have a sad sound, in a way.

Anyway, hope I've helped. You don't need to tune differently unless it's easier to play that way, and usually it's easiest just to play in standard tuning (EADGBe).
#5
It doesn't mean that you have to tune differently, it just means that the first chord of the song will be d for the first and g for the second.... you will have to find a version of each song in those keys or transcribe them yourself. For example, the song "Mary-Jane's Last Dance" by Tom Petty is in the key of Am.... so the chord progression goes: Am, G, D, Am...but now let's say that you wanted to play it in the key of Cm.... now the entire song would be moved three frets (1.5 steps) higher and now would go: Cm, Bb, F, Cm.... understand?
#6
Quote by slapfunk_101
It doesn't mean that you have to tune differently, it just means that the first chord of the song will be d for the first and g for the second.... you will have to find a version of each song in those keys or transcribe them yourself. For example, the song "Mary-Jane's Last Dance" by Tom Petty is in the key of Am.... so the chord progression goes: Am, G, D, Am...but now let's say that you wanted to play it in the key of Cm.... now the entire song would be moved three frets (1.5 steps) higher and now would go: Cm, Bb, F, Cm.... understand?

Okay yes, so I just play as its written! Thank you very much! That just saved me a lot of stress