#1
Okay so in our band me and the other guitarists just jam sometimes and I make some riff and he improvises some amazing solo even if he doesn't know any music theory... I want to do that also but how can I improvise? Whenever I try it's just a bunch of random notes that doesn't fit together... So what should I remember when I try to improvise solos?
GEAR

Dean V79
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#3
Scales. Thats all you need. I don't really know any music theory, ut if you pull notes out from a scale eg minor pentatonic, the solo should generally fit the chord progression (assuming its the right scale.) Then its just a case of other techniques like hammer ons, pull offs, bends etc, to add your own personal touch to it.

Hope this helps.
#4
Quote by Mr E
Scales. Thats all you need. I don't really know any music theory, ut if you pull notes out from a scale eg minor pentatonic, the solo should generally fit the chord progression (assuming its the right scale.) Then its just a case of other techniques like hammer ons, pull offs, bends etc, to add your own personal touch to it.

Hope this helps.

Thanks, I have another questions aswell. Lets say that the rhytm would start wih a G power chord, should I play a G scale then? Or how do I know what fits into the rhytm guitar?
GEAR

Dean V79
Randall RG50-TC
Roland MicroCube
#5
just mix and match solo's from other songs and slightly adjust them to make them blend together
#6
Quote by Mr E
Scales. Thats all you need. I don't really know any music theory, ut if you pull notes out from a scale eg minor pentatonic, the solo should generally fit the chord progression (assuming its the right scale.) Then its just a case of other techniques like hammer ons, pull offs, bends etc, to add your own personal touch to it.

Hope this helps.



if you want to improvise and you dont wanna know theory then you dont even have to learn scales...just follow your feel...
i know it may sound weird but this is the truth...
even hendrix didnt know theory....i assume...
#7
Quote by fila_93
Thanks, I have another questions aswell. Lets say that the rhytm would start wih a G power chord, should I play a G scale then? Or how do I know what fits into the rhytm guitar?


Just play what sounds right. But possibly a G scale
#8
Quote by sbikram
if you want to improvise and you dont wanna know theory then you dont even have to learn scales...just follow your feel...
i know it may sound weird but this is the truth...
even hendrix didnt know theory....i assume...

You dont *have* to learn theory, however you'll get where you want to be a lot quicker and it'll be a lot easier if you do. Following your "feel" is utter tosh - to properly express your emotions through a musical instrument you need to know what sounds are going to come out of it so you can pick what you think best suits said emotions. You also need to know which notes will work over which chords, technically they all work but they all affect the underlying chord in different ways and that interaction is a major pary of modern music. You can do that through the painstaking process of trial and error to discover what people learned 500 years ago or you can simply refer to the information that they committed to papaer aka music theory.


And please, enough with the "hendrix didn't know theory" bollocks, that's been done to death.
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#9
People just don't understand the concept of what music theory is. All it is is the study of what sounds good with what. It's not some over-xomplex set of rules that are there to make music hard. The point is to stay in key, and to know what notes and scales sound good with what progressions and chords. It's that simple.

It is better to say that you "know music" then to "know theory". Jimi Hendrix "knew music" because all of his music is in key, and all the notes sound good over the progressions and riffs he played. That's no coincidence. The fact is, some notes go good together, some don't, and some just plain crash together like two cars in a head-on collision. Try harmonizing a lick using perfect fifths and it will sound pretty good. Do the same with minor seconds and it will sound like an ambulance.

Point is, all of the information about music has been transcribed into words over the last 500 years to make it easier to understand. Learn it. It will help you. Don't let it limit you, let it guide you. If your rhythym player plays a riff in A, start by using the A minor pentatonic scale. It will always sound right. Whether or not it sounds good depends on how YOU play, not how much music you know. Learning music is about knowing what works, while practicing your instrument to learn how everything sounds is what makes your music sound good.
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