#1
Theoretically you solo in the key of A over
A in ionic
D in lydian
E in mixo

But these contain exactly the same notes. Is it true that over degree II, III and IV chords you solo in the A minor scale? Sorry for the confusement
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Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

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#3
i think you have it backwards...
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#4
Quote by 08L1V10N
Theoretically you solo in the key of A over
A in ionic
D in lydian
E in mixo

But these contain exactly the same notes. Is it true that over degree II, III and IV chords you solo in the A minor scale? Sorry for the confusement


Do you have any idea of what you're saying?? An A Ionian Mode (not Ionic) is the A major scale so why are you bringing up A minor (A Aeolian Mode)???? And there's more modes that Ionian, Lydian, and Mixolydian. And of course they have the same notes, what do you think modes consist of?? What key are you asking about?? OMG
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix
#5
lol... it's Ionian, not iconic.

anyways, you don't need to change scales just because the chord changes. you CAN, but it's not required. you could play minor modes over the minor degrees, but again, you don't NEED to change scales for every chord.

put simply, all the chords in the key of A major are derived in some way from the A major scale, and so in most cases, you can just use that one scale over all the chords. there may be some spots where tension arises between the notes (ie: focusing on the major third of your scale while playing a sus4 on your seventh degree), but you'll be able to recognize and avoid that kind of thing pretty quick.

there is no set rule for which scales must be played over which chords. as long as the notes that make up the chords are found within the scale you are playing, it's hard to go wrong. a GENERAL rule is that you should not change modes or scales every single time the chord changes. it can be very hard to follow, and makes the solo seem disjointed. of course if you stumble on the right combination of chord progressions, modes and pacing, you might be able to write something that is easy to listen to, and creates huge musical movement.
#6
Warheart - u probably know what you are talking about. However he is asking for HELP, not for some flaming.

O8iVion - Sorry, i do not know anything about modes!!
#7
If you're soloing in A major, play the A major scale. Modes don't factor into it at all.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Just a quick tip for you TS. When notating in Roman Numerals, lower case resemble minor, and upper case resemble major. Like this...

For the Major Scale.

I ii iii IV V vi vii
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
If you're soloing in A major, play the A major scale. Modes don't factor into it at all.
They do if you're playing the changes
#10
I thought that you only play A major over the chords A D and E in the key of A
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#11
you can play the A major scale over every chord in the key of A major, likewise if you're in the key of A minor you'd use the A minor scale. That's the whole point of keys and it's what tends to happen in modern music.
Actually called Mark!

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#12
Quote by steven seagull
you can play the A major scale over every chord in the key of A major, likewise if you're in the key of A minor you'd use the A minor scale. That's the whole point of keys and it's what tends to happen in modern music.


Yeah, but how frikkin boring.

I would love to help TS but I don't understand his question
"Battle not with monsters, lest ye become a monster, and if you gaze into the abyss, your eyes will get sore after a while."
#13
Quote by demonofthenight
They do if you're playing the changes


Yep it depends on how you look at it.

A Jazz player would say that he/she changes modes with the chord changes.

A Jazz player might even say he is player E Mixolydian over an A Major chord.

This just means he emphasizes the notes in the E7 more so than that of the A.

It creates the sound of an AM11
#14
Quote by JamesDouglas
Yeah, but how frikkin boring.

I would love to help TS but I don't understand his question



boring music comes from boring musicians - it's got nothing to do with the scales they use or the theory behind what they play.
Actually called Mark!

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People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#15
Quote by ouchies
Yep it depends on how you look at it.

A Jazz player would say that he/she changes modes with the chord changes.

A Jazz player might even say he is player E Mixolydian over an A Major chord.

This just means he emphasizes the notes in the E7 more so than that of the A.

It creates the sound of an AM11
yeah sure if the chord could be either, like you could play C lydian over Am9 because Am9 contains similar notes, but if you played E mixolydian over an A chord it would just sound like you were playing A ionian badly and stressing the wrong notes (really not trying to sound rude, I'm just tired). Keep in mind chord tones (and occasionally pentatonics) should be played on stressed beats and all other notes should be treated as dissonance and its easier to do this if your playing the right mode for the chord (unless you dont use scale degrees and intervals to improvise).
#16
Quote by steven seagull


boring music comes from boring musicians - it's got nothing to do with the scales they use or the theory behind what they play.


The scales they use is the theory behind what they play.

Of course musicianship matters, but if you use the same scale all the time it gets boring. Look at Kirk Hammett, he uses minor pentatonics ALL the time and it's just dreadful.

Interesting scales and chords can most definitely spice up a song.
"Battle not with monsters, lest ye become a monster, and if you gaze into the abyss, your eyes will get sore after a while."
#17
Quote by JamesDouglas
The scales they use is the theory behind what they play.

Of course musicianship matters, but if you use the same scale all the time it gets boring. Look at Kirk Hammett, he uses minor pentatonics ALL the time and it's just dreadful.

Interesting scales and chords can most definitely spice up a song.


Sorry but that's incorrect, you do not need to learn a new scale to 'spice up' a solo. Explain to me how Jimi Hendrix, Kirk Hammet and Eric johnson sound the same? They use primarily the same scale (eric Johnson adds a few notes from the natural minor), pent minor? The differences are near limitless (ok slight exaggeration), but dynamics, phrasing and your choice (and order) of notes in a scale not to mention the chords and rhythm you are playing over can really alter the feel of a scale.

As for the Ts question, I can't give too much advice as I'm not entirely sure what is being asked. If it is the typical question about changing into different relative modes over one key, then modes are of no use and it is the backwards teaching of relative modes that is throwing a lot of people off (I don't think relative modes should even be mentioned until people understand parallel modes, and the interval formulas).
#18
Quote by Helpy Helperton
Sorry but that's incorrect, you do not need to learn a new scale to 'spice up' a solo. Explain to me how Jimi Hendrix, Kirk Hammet and Eric johnson sound the same? They use primarily the same scale (eric Johnson adds a few notes from the natural minor), pent minor? The differences are near limitless (ok slight exaggeration), but dynamics, phrasing and your choice (and order) of notes in a scale not to mention the chords and rhythm you are playing over can really alter the feel of a scale.

As for the Ts question, I can't give too much advice as I'm not entirely sure what is being asked. If it is the typical question about changing into different relative modes over one key, then modes are of no use and it is the backwards teaching of relative modes that is throwing a lot of people off (I don't think relative modes should even be mentioned until people understand parallel modes, and the interval formulas).


As I said in my previous post: of course musicianship matters but if everyone was to use the same scale it would get really boring really quickly.

The reason those artists sound so different is because of their genre differences. But if someone uses the same scale for every song the solos will get pretty boring, case in point: Kirk Hammet.
"Battle not with monsters, lest ye become a monster, and if you gaze into the abyss, your eyes will get sore after a while."
#19
We understand your point James Douglas, and I myself (and I'm sure a few of the other MT regulars) respectfully disagree. The notes used are not the determining factor in the sound of a melody, it is just a part. Phrasing, order, duration, harmony and other factors come into play. Many genres, and even multiple artists within the same genre, have been using the same songwriting methods for ages and although some do sound very similar, most don't (excluding nowadays) even though they are using the same scales and chords.

For a very long time, the only scale widely used was the major scale, and it's relative minor, and yet we have a plethora of music that sounds vastly different.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#20
Quote by The_Sophist
We understand your point James Douglas, and I myself (and I'm sure a few of the other MT regulars) respectfully disagree. The notes used are not the determining factor in the sound of a melody, it is just a part. Phrasing, order, duration, harmony and other factors come into play. Many genres, and even multiple artists within the same genre, have been using the same songwriting methods for ages and although some do sound very similar, most don't (excluding nowadays) even though they are using the same scales and chords.

For a very long time, the only scale widely used was the major scale, and it's relative minor, and yet we have a plethora of music that sounds vastly different.


I wasn't arguing just in the context of melody writing. There's a whole other sound world out there that one can access through scales: Indian, African, Mediterranean to name a few.

Notice how the west used the major and relative minor scales; assuming one wants to broaden one's sound outside of the western paradigm then major and minor aren't terribly useful.

All I'm saying is that the major (and its relative) is quite restricting, especially today when it's hard to be original.
"Battle not with monsters, lest ye become a monster, and if you gaze into the abyss, your eyes will get sore after a while."
#21
Yes, it would all be the same notes, but you will be emphasising different ones. In A Ionian, the important notes would be A C# E G#, whereas in E Mixolydian the main notes would be E G# B D.

So over a II chord (B minor) in the key of A major , you would play B Dorian, which has the same notes as A Ionian, C# Phrygian, E Mixolydian etc.
#22
I know what your saying, I just disagree. There are endless things you can do with the major scale alone, and you can create great music with just that. I'm not saying you shouldn't learn everything you can, including exotic scales, I'm just saying you shouldn't become dependent on them. It is possible to create original and good music using the major scale.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#23
So over a II chord (B minor) in the key of A major , you would play B Dorian, which has the same notes as A Ionian, C# Phrygian, E Mixolydian etc.


Over the ii chord in the key of A major, you would play A major. Your tonal center is still A.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#24
Quote by demonofthenight
yeah sure if the chord could be either, like you could play C lydian over Am9 because Am9 contains similar notes, but if you played E mixolydian over an A chord it would just sound like you were playing A ionian badly and stressing the wrong notes (really not trying to sound rude, I'm just tired). Keep in mind chord tones (and occasionally pentatonics) should be played on stressed beats and all other notes should be treated as dissonance and its easier to do this if your playing the right mode for the chord (unless you dont use scale degrees and intervals to improvise).


Learn how to play jazz
#27
Quote by mdc
Just a quick tip for you TS. When notating in Roman Numerals, lower case resemble minor, and upper case resemble major. Like this...

For the Major Scale.

I ii iii IV V vi vii



....

I never knew that.....
hue
#28
Quote by steven seagull


boring music comes from boring musicians - it's got nothing to do with the scales they use or the theory behind what they play.

+1 We need a damn sticky for "What scales do I use. Someone yesterday said "I dont use the pentatonic its cliche". How the **** can 5 notes be cliche. Its definatly only the way the guitarist uses these 5 notes that could possibly sound cliche. Theres so many threads on here asking what scale do use to sound like randy rhoads or so and so. As if we told them harmonic minor hes going to go " ok thanks guys and walk off to his room and create an epic Rhoads style solo.

Sorry for the offtopic rant but I have to agree with this statment.
#29
Quote by /-\liceNChains
As if we told them harmonic minor hes going to go " ok thanks guys and walk off to his room and create an epic Rhoads style solo.

That's an epic comment! I couldn't stop laughing for a long long time.

I'd sig it but.... I still prefer mine.