#1
So, I've been playing guitar for a while almost 3 years, and I know my music theory and how all of that works. So now I'm doing some sight reading so I can learn my fretboard all over. My question is this, will constant sight reading and practicing help me be able to see a piece of sheet music, and play it mostly accurately? I guess I'm just wondering if there are other ways of doing it as well. I have some primer piano books, maybe I should start going through those? Oh and I'm not looking for shortcuts, just other ways to help my knowledge of where every note is on the fretboard. I'll be back to check on this in about an hour, I have piano practice coming up. Thanks in advance!
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Gear:
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Epiphone Dot
Jackson DK2M
Ibanez RG2EX1

Amps
Roland Cube 30X

Pedals
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Digitech Whammy
Dunlop Crybaby
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#3
Sight reading is extremely difficult. Right now, technically, you're just reading. You find the notes on your guitar, but you're not reproducing the piece of music instantly. To do so, what you have mentioned is needed, good knowledge of the fretboard and LOTS of practise reading.

Try to avoid sight reading things you've heard before, unless you plan on learning them later on, because it's not as good practise, because even though you don't consciously realize it your fingers know where certain sounds are and if you can hear the melody in your head your fingers will sort of go there without you wanting/noticing.


And piano will help you musically in general, so keep at it. When something helps you in general, it can always improve more specific knowledge.
#4
Quote by TrP6 SeNiLe
So, I've been playing guitar for a while almost 3 years, and I know my music theory and how all of that works. So now I'm doing some sight reading so I can learn my fretboard all over. My question is this, will constant sight reading and practicing help me be able to see a piece of sheet music, and play it mostly accurately? I guess I'm just wondering if there are other ways of doing it as well. I have some primer piano books, maybe I should start going through those? Oh and I'm not looking for shortcuts, just other ways to help my knowledge of where every note is on the fretboard. I'll be back to check on this in about an hour, I have piano practice coming up. Thanks in advance!


Well, the key is to keep reading music, it doesn't necessarily have to be site reading all the time. As long as you're reading and making the connection between what you're reading and what your playing, you will certainly increase your fretboard knowledge. (and actually, the familiarity, may serve as a reinforcer).

I would highly recommend reading music that's intended for the guitar rather than for piano. ( reading piano music is okay but not as a replacement for reading music notated for the guitar). Also, make sure you're reading in all the various positions.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 13, 2008,
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well, the key is to keep reading music, it doesn't necessarily have to be site reading all the time. As long as you're reading and making the connection between what you're reading and what your playing, you will certainly increase your fretboard knowledge. (and actually, the familiarity, may serve as a reinforcer).

I would highly recommend reading music that's intended for the guitar rather than for piano. ( reading piano music is okay but not as a replacement for reading music notated for the guitar). Also, make sure you're reading in all the various positions.


Good! I don't plan on using piano music to entirely replace guitar oriented music. I'll probably download some classical pieces I've never heard for Guitar Pro.


Quote by Confusius
Sight reading is extremely difficult. Right now, technically, you're just reading. You find the notes on your guitar, but you're not reproducing the piece of music instantly. To do so, what you have mentioned is needed, good knowledge of the fretboard and LOTS of practise reading.

Try to avoid sight reading things you've heard before, unless you plan on learning them later on, because it's not as good practise, because even though you don't consciously realize it your fingers know where certain sounds are and if you can hear the melody in your head your fingers will sort of go there without you wanting/noticing.


And piano will help you musically in general, so keep at it. When something helps you in general, it can always improve more specific knowledge.


Great, thanks! I'll be sure to make sure I SIGHT read and with new stuff.


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This is my signature... And yes this is the most original thing... ever.
Gear:
Guitars
Epiphone Dot
Jackson DK2M
Ibanez RG2EX1

Amps
Roland Cube 30X

Pedals
DOD FX25-B Envelope Filter
Digitech Whammy
Dunlop Crybaby
EHX Big Muff Pi