#3
There are 7th chords you can move, and I think theres also moveable diminished chord shapes. Also, maybe play around with chord inversions, which are just the notes of a chord in a different position. Look up an article on it, its actually simple with a bit of theory work involved.
#4
You can barre anything you're physically capable of like C or D, or use different voicings.
#5
D and F barre forms are good to know, C might be worth your time as well. Other than that, 7th chords would be a good thing to learn.
#6
Quote by StratoTele
Major and Minor 7ths sound like a good fix for you.



as well as dominant 7ths.
sus2 and sus4 chords are heavenly.


there are also the augmented chords (which are kinda hella confusing)


go to all-guitar-chords.com
Quote by King Twili
It's just me and Doris here ;_;



Quote by Zaphikh
Poops is the chat MC - but here we know him as Early Cuyler.


Free Downloads, Yo!
#7
Quote by Nightfyre
D and F barre forms are good to know, C might be worth your time as well.



the D is the C shape..... essentially.


learning their connection is a great thing.

try playing this anywhere on the fretboard:

 E  A  D  G  B  E
 -  -  -  -  -  -
 |  |  |  X  |  |
- - - - - - - - -
 |  |  |  |  X  |
- - - - - - - - -
 |  |  X  |  |  | 
- - - - - - - - - 


the note on the B string is the root...
Quote by King Twili
It's just me and Doris here ;_;



Quote by Zaphikh
Poops is the chat MC - but here we know him as Early Cuyler.


Free Downloads, Yo!
Last edited by Early Cuyler at Oct 13, 2008,
#8
A diminished shape, in D:


e --4
B --6
G --4
D --6
A --5
E ---


Then there's a shape similar to the open C major chord you can use, in D again:


e --2
B --3
G --2
D --4
A --5
E ---


...and one based on the open D major shape. If you move flatten the note on the B string once, you get a major seventh chord, and if you do it once more you get a dominant seventh chord:


e --7
B --8
G --7
D --5
A ---
E ---


These were just the ones at the top of my head. You can find other ones if you write down the notes of a specific chord and find them on the fretboard in combinations you haven't seen before.
#9
CAGED - Heres the 5 open chord shapes barred to make a Db major chord. Bold notes are root notes.

Db major using the C shape barre chord
First finger bars the bottom three strings. This requires good pinky strength on the A string
|-1
|-2
|-1
|-3
|-4
|-x

Db major chord using the A shape barre chord. -you know this one already.
|-4
|-6
|-6
|-6
|-4
|-x

Db major chord using the G shape barre chord. First finger barres D G B strings.
|-9
|-6
|-6
|-6
|-8
|-9

Db major chord using the E Shape barre chord
|-9
|-9
|-10
|-11
|-11
|-9

Db major using the D shape barre chord.
|-13
|-14
|-13
|-11
|-x
|-x

I suggest learning all 5 shapes so that you can play any shape of any chord. Some of the fingerings will feel awkward to begin with but they're great for improving fingering strength and control.

Then learn the minor and various seventh versions.

They are all useful as often you might want to play a specific chord close to a specific fret. You might not play the whole shape but only part of it. For example you might leave off the high E on the G shaped barre chord.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Oct 15, 2008,
#10
I consider there to be 3 main "shapes" of moveable major or minor chords (flame on!), which can be categorized into E, A, and D (or what many people consider a "C shape"). These are the three shapes that can easily be made with the hands. The E and A shape are the most common, whereas the D shape is less of a barre chord and more of a moveable shape.

Sounds like you're already familiar with the E and A shapes, so try moving your D shape up the fretboard.

Also, learn some chord extensions (dom7, min7, maj7, 9 are the most important) and you can throw some extra flavor into almost any chord.
#11
^ I could narrow that down to two.

If you look at E, A and D, they're the previous chord's fretted notes up a string with the new B string note raised a semitone.

Ditto for G and C.

Really, there's only a "forward" octave shape, and "backward" octave shape.

If this post has confused anyone, play through the shapes, and if you still don't see it, ignore it, 20Tigers post is perfectly correct.
#12
Quote by Freepower
Really, there's only a "forward" octave shape, and "backward" octave shape.
I edited my post above to show all the different shapes for a single chord (Db major). I also bolded the root notes in each chord shape.

I think this concept of "forward" and "backward" octave shapes is very important. I would encourage drawing all the root shapes and chord shapes onto a blank fretboard to see how they all fit together.

Understanding how the root shapes and the corresponding chords fit together one after the other over the entire fretboard is a useful insight on the path to mastering the fretboard.
Si
#13
Quote by Philbigtime
I consider there to be 3 main "shapes" of moveable major or minor chords (flame on!), which can be categorized into E, A, and D (or what many people consider a "C shape"). These are the three shapes that can easily be made with the hands. The E and A shape are the most common, whereas the D shape is less of a barre chord and more of a moveable shape.

When you speak of sliding the D shape up and down I think Heroin by Velvet Underground.

For a C shape barre chord look at the second strummed chord in the intro to the acoustic Hotel California from The Eagles - Hell Freezes Over. This is a C Shaped barre chord - not a D shape like in Heroin.

Also check out Bob Dylan doing It Aint Me. He plays a C and slides the C shape up two frets to a D. He doesn't play the e strings and leaves the G an open G making it a Dadd11. Again clearly not a D shaped chord but definitely a D chord using the open C shape.
Si