#1
Hi Y'All

I fairly new at guitar & wondered if someone can explain to me.......i was told that i can use any of the notes in the particular scale to play "Lead" & it will sound good...as long as the scale i'm playing in matches the "key" of the song or backing track..correct?

Well lets take the scale of Am (A Minor)for example..i will list all the frets for each note on each string so you know what i'm refering to... starting on the 6th string at the 5th fret then to the 7th & 8th fret......

Do the same for the 5th String!
For the 4th String it's fret 5 & 7
For the 3rd String it's Frets 4, 5 & 7
For the 2nd String it's 5, 6,& 8
For the first String it same as 6th String

Ok now thats out the way......If this is correct.....why is it when i see guitarists playing "Lead" they move around the fretboard from the bottom to the top ( going higher & lower in sound)pretty much all over the place!

Is there an easy way to understand what notes on the fretboard can be used in any given song?

Thanx Y'all

Cheers
Mike
#3
what you see people playing is generally not a major (or in this case minor) scale. most times its a pentatonic scale, and more times than not, they add extra notes for such things as emphasis, chromatic runs, or changing keys altogether.

what you illustrated is correct, but it is not necessarily the only way to do it. read up on some lessons about theory.
My Gear:
Gibson Faded Flying V
"Dante's Inferno" Iceman
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe 112
etc.




Quote by freedoms_stain
I can't imagine anything worse than shagging to Mark Knopfler.

Maybe shagging Mark Knopfler, but that's about it.
#4
I'll try... someone correct me if I'm wrong. If you take your Am scale (or what ever key you're in) and look at it, it's in a pattern. You can take this pattern and move it all over the fretboard to get the same notes in different octaves. I'm a completly self taught guitarist so I'm not too big on theory,... I just play what sounds good to me. Anyway... I know alot of people who get stuck in this method and wind up just going up and down scales and call it lead. So, just get familier with the patterns (or boxes, as I've heard them called) and play from the soul.
#5
You should at least look at the many articles that are archived on this VERY SITE that will allow you to understand the basics of lead playing. Not to be rude of course, its just that these other guys are giving you very partial information on what exactly it is to play lead, and to tell you the truth, since there is one book or theory on it, it is important to learn from articles, songs, and theory as to get a feel for what lead is. For all it matters a lead part can be one single note, but what you want to learn is how the notes can be shaped and fitted into a song, not how to play a type of song or other such thing which is what these guys are telling you.
i enjoy head
#7
It's not about fret positions, it's about the notes you're playing and the way they fit with the chords you're playing over. You've got no chance of understanding any of this until you learn the notes on the fretboard and then start learning about scales properly...have a read of the Crusade articles by Josh Urban in the Columns section.

Learning scales and such isn't like learning a tab - it's not just "there" for you to copy. You have to spend time doing some old-fashioned studying away from the guitar to take it all in and understand things properly.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#8
They move around the fretboard because they know music theory and what scales work with the song.
GHOST BLOWJOB!
WHOOO! WOOOOOOOOOOOO!
#9
Quote by Mikelly

Is there an easy way to understand what notes on the fretboard can be used in any given song?


After 10+yrs of playing i`d like to know this too!


Oh Lord, make it EASY.... And Lo The Good Lord sayeth.... " Consider the key of the song, consider the chords and using the chord notes that are not in the basic key scale, consider the use of Modes behind certain chords, consider the development of the ear to instinctively hear the difference between semi-tone and tone intervals.... and stop asking for EASY answers, just enjoy it...."
Quote by George Harrison
I can`t put more than 4 notes together in a run
#10
Solos are tricky. A lot of them combine scales using (a) mode(s) to connect them, and it all comes down to phrasing really. Good phrasing of notes can make a basic solo sound pretty damn good.
#11
Quote by TK1
what you see people playing is generally not a major (or in this case minor) scale. most times its a pentatonic scale.


Pentatonics are in Major and Minor keys...

Basically what i've been taught is pentatonics take out a few notes of the scale so it makes your solos flow easier, but, a good trick to learn also is note choice.

Say the rhythm guitarist is playing Am D C G in a loop (or something) when he's finished D, for example, and strikes the C for the first time, make sure the note you play as he strikes is contained in the chord. In this case if you chose C E or G, it would fit perfectly. Then go off and do whatever you like until the next chord hits, which would contain G B D, and do the same again. It works.
#12
Quote by pak1351
Solos are tricky. A lot of them combine scales using (a) mode(s) to connect them, and it all comes down to phrasing really. Good phrasing of notes can make a basic solo sound pretty damn good.

Actually most solos don't go near modes and instead fit nicely into a single scale.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#13
Well, there are only 7 Notes + the sharps and flats of each. There notes are grouped into octaves, and the octaves repeat all over the fretboard. The open 6th string is the same note as the 12th fret of the 6th string, and the open 1st string Just different octaves. What you are seeing lead players do is just play the notes of a scale in different positions on the neck.

Hope that helped Take it the Musician Talk forum and read the sticky/ask freepower. Lots of basic theory info in there