#1
I usually compose songs and riffs using the blues pentatonic scale, but once the solo comes, it starts sounding bland. I was just wondering if there are other scales or modes i can incorporate into the pentatonic scale.

Say i'm in A minor, what other scales could i use other than A minor pentatonic?

and to find out what other scales to used based off what key i'm in would i use the circle of fifths?
#3
Quote by masturnate42
I usually compose songs and riffs using the blues pentatonic scale, but once the solo comes, it starts sounding bland. I was just wondering if there are other scales or modes i can incorporate into the pentatonic scale.

Say i'm in A minor, what other scales could i use other than A minor pentatonic?

and to find out what other scales to used based off what key i'm in would i use the circle of fifths?


A minor? depends on the progression but you generally would use a variation of minor over a minor chord. (natural minor, harmonic minor, melodic minor, dorian, phrygian...and many more)

but using the blues scale will get extremely tiresome and bland, my advice? its a cliche, and a crutch, use it as little as possible

and this is just my pet peeve, but, the blues scale has 6 notes, thus its not pentatonic (pent=5)
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#4
Quote by masturnate42

Say i'm in A minor, what other scales could i use other than A minor pentatonic?

and to find out what other scales to used based off what key i'm in would i use the circle of fifths?


You can play various minor Am scales to go over the Am Chord:

A Pentatonic
A Aeolian
A Dorian
A Phrygian
A Locrian

Depending on the progression, some of these will fit better.

Since Am is the relative minor of the C major, you can also use these scales and would fit well over Am:

B Phrygian (My fave)
C Ionian
D Dorian
E Phrygian
F Lydian
G Mixolydian

I hope that helps
#6
Quote by jsantos
You can play various minor Am scales to go over the Am Chord:

A Pentatonic
A Aeolian
A Dorian
A Phrygian
A Locrian


Except locrian is not a minor scale, it is diminished, 1,b2,b3,4,b5,b6,b7
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#8
Before you knock the A minor pentatonic you must first be able to shift all over the fretboard and the A minor pentatonic in any position anywhere on the fretboard. If you are playing in one box pattern of course it will sound boring. You didnt specify what your current abilities are so i had to mention this just in case. Learning other solos by other artists note for note can teach you new ways to make phrases with the pentatonic scale which you already know then you can incorporate the ideas and techniques to spice up your own playing.

Basically if its boring dont blame the pentatonic scale as its more likely your playing that is boring. This is not meant to be offensive but we have so many threads saying what scale to use by people who think the scale does more than it really does. Think more about note selection and how the notes sound in specific places and keep trying new ideas. I guarantee you havent come anywhere near close to "using" pentatonic scales to their full potential. That is also not meant as an insult because even the greatest havent tried every possbility.

That said if you know the key your in which is pritty damn important then you can use the major scale of that key or the relative minor scale for that key if you want. But remember the music you are playing over is the most important thing to listen too you need to know what chords and notes are being played so you can meaningfully place notes at sweet sounding places rather then guessing. Practice writting and improvising and keep studying theory and learning songs/solos. It takes a long time but the more effort you put in to understanding the more you will get back. This is probably not the answer you were wanting to hear but theres no short cuts to compising and improvising awsome solos only hard work can get you there.
#9
Quote by Lefty7Stringer
Except locrian is not a minor scale, it is diminished, 1,b2,b3,4,b5,b6,b7


I think if you phrase with the b3, b6, and b7 leading to the root.. it sounds cool with a minor chord behind it. It should work that way.
#10
Quote by jsantos
I think if you phrase with the b3, b6, and b7 leading to the root.. it sounds cool with a minor chord behind it. It should work that way.


yes but then your're not even using or implying the diminished 5th, so why would you even bother calling it locrain? b3,b6,b7 are consistent with natrual minor and phrygian
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Quote by death.prog
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When I brought up this page, so much fail dumped out of my computer screen and all over my hands, severely damaging my ability as a musician.
#11
Quote by /-\liceNChains
This is probably not the answer you were wanting to hear but theres no short cuts to compising and improvising awsome solos only hard work can get you there.


that was actually a perfect answer. I know where i am as a musician, and i know that there is so much more to learn. I'm working away at learning theory as monotonous as it is. thanks
#12
Quote by Lefty7Stringer
yes but then your're not even using or implying the diminished 5th, so why would you even bother calling it locrain? b3,b6,b7 are consistent with natrual minor and phrygian


I didn't say you can't use it, In fact use the b5, b2 as much as you want...... Just be careful where you land. It's the same way players use "blue" notes with their pentatonics or other type of chromatics to embellish their melodies.