#1
My dad says I only need to scuff up the original finish before I paint, I kinda think I should remove all of it. Which should I do?


Any tips appreciated, also.
#3
Removing all of it would probably have better results.
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#4
Quote by fartripper67
My dad says I only need to scuff up the original finish before I paint, I kinda think I should remove all of it. Which should I do?


Any tips appreciated, also.


Is the current finish, the actual original finish?

If so and it is in good condition (intact) then yes, you could just sand the original finish.

Use P220 grit or there about's, DO NOT use a fine 600 grit paper.

You need decent scratches in it in order for your primer (you were going to use primer weren't you?) to adhere to the original finish.

Get some mild panel wipe (auto body store) and wipe down the body after sanding.

Without touching the body with bare skin, you can then apply your primer.

Use two coats as a minimum, but follow the directions on the tin.

Ideally use a 2k (2 part) primer (and lacquer if you are lacquering it).

After the primer is fully cured, sand to about 3-400 grit, then you can start applying your colour coats.

If you do decide to remove the old finish, then you will have to make sure that the body is free from contaminants before you start re-finishing.

If you use a chemical stripper, make sure you wash the body well with water and fully allow it to dry.

Then you need to raise the grain and sand it back a few times, then seal it with sanding sealer, before you can start priming.
Last edited by Skeet UK at Oct 14, 2008,
#6
Quote by fartripper67
It's the original finish.


And thanks for the help.


You are very welcome.

If you think you may need more help, feel free to PM me or post up and I will try to help.