#1
I've been looking at the tabs of some famous video game tunes (mario zelda tetris) and I am really wondering how they were composed.

Am I correct to assume that they use some sort of counterpoint in their structure?

if so where would be the best place to learn to compose like that?

I'm asking this because I really love tunes like that where individual lines form a harmony together and would like to be able to make music like that too (instead of chord based songs)

Thanks in advance for any comments...
#2
Composers of the Baroque era used counterpoint extensively.

Check out Bach, Scarlatti, Handel etc.

All those lovely harpsichord pieces
#3
Most of the Nintendo themes song are composed by Koji Kondo eg: Mario, and Zelda. His style is currently quite different to other game composers. He likes putting dissonance in a lot of his tune. But for some reason it sounds great.
#4
yea, whenever I looked up the tab for the mario theme song I was surprised at how many out of key notes were in it it cuz it really doesn't sound like it
#5
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Most of the Nintendo themes song are composed by Koji Kondo eg: Mario, and Zelda. His style is currently quite different to other game composers. He likes putting dissonance in a lot of his tune. But for some reason it sounds great.
You do realise it's just about impossible to not have dissonance in a song?

Quote by gutsman
I'm asking this because I really love tunes like that where individual lines form a harmony together and would like to be able to make music like that too (instead of chord based songs)
Counterpoint is still chord based to an extent. Each measure (or bar) will have an implied harmony and every note thats not a chord tone of that implied harmony will be treated as dissonance.

Counterpoint is probably the most difficult way of writing a song. Theres a million difficult rules (yes, rules, good music actually has rules to it), some of them are about keeping the melodies individual, some if them can be ignored because they're about making the melody singable, some of them can be occasionally disobeyed because they're about keeping the melodies consonant with each other.

You need to be really commited if you want to learn counterpoint, its pretty much the pinacle of music theory.

And you need to learn how to write an effective, singable, catchy melody first.

You've got to learn to crawl before you walk, take a step back and master basic theory.
#6
Yeah I know my way around the basics, just wanted to know if those tunes were also founded on the principles of counterpoint. Thanks for the replies everyone.