#1
I've sorta hit a wall with my scales. I've been trying to get my minor and major keys memorized in all keys and I'm looking for some different ways to practice scales. Could you list what you do when you practice your scales?
#3
play them up and down to a metronome at different speeds with alternate picking varying my rhythm and up and down strokes.
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#4
Well, other than using them to improvise, of course, I also sequence them in different ways. For example, for each note, playing a certain interval before the next note (for example, thirds, which may be major or minor, depending on the scale degree). Hard to describe them without notation or something, but don't just run them up and down in order. Work out different patterns and practice those as well.

Make sure you learn how the different scale patterns connect across the fretboard. Can you slide up a note and just keep going in the next pattern without getting lost?

Try and use different rhythms than just straight 8ths, 16ths, triplets, etc. Try swinging it, switching between 8ths and 16ths, whatever you can come up with. And make it sound musical! Scales are beautiful, so try and make them sound that way.

I also highly recommend mixing in arpeggios so you learn how they relate to the scale. That's *very* important.

You need to work on turning them into real music, and running them up and down in order is only the first of many steps.

Grep.
#5
i practise with a metronome, learn different forms and most importantly, IMPROVISE on them...
i practice thirds, four in a row, etc...
#6
I look at the notes and figure out what my options are for establishing a tonal center, and then compose with them.
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#7
Pretty much in chronological order:
1) Pick a key, and learn the notes of the scale in that key.
2) Practice going up and down the up and down the scale in a bunch of different positions getting myself familiar.
3) Semi-improvising. I'll pick a note grouping, like 5's, or 8th note triplet feel, and wander around while staying in that rhythm. The fact that I'm locked into a particular rhythm puts me a little bit on the spot in that I can't stop and go "duh, how does this scale go again?", I've got to keep going and think fast enough to find the notes. I'll go for a few bars and end on a longer note, but it's got to be on a certain note in the scale, like the root or the 5th. This makes sure I'm thinking in terms of where the notes are in the scale, not just the fact that they are in the scale.
4) Improvise.
5) Transpose to other keys.
#8
Quote by se012101
Pretty much in chronological order:
1) Pick a key, and learn the notes of the scale in that key.
2) Practice going up and down the up and down the scale in a bunch of different positions getting myself familiar.
3) Semi-improvising. I'll pick a note grouping, like 5's, or 8th note triplet feel, and wander around while staying in that rhythm. The fact that I'm locked into a particular rhythm puts me a little bit on the spot in that I can't stop and go "duh, how does this scale go again?", I've got to keep going and think fast enough to find the notes. I'll go for a few bars and end on a longer note, but it's got to be on a certain note in the scale, like the root or the 5th. This makes sure I'm thinking in terms of where the notes are in the scale, not just the fact that they are in the scale.
4) Improvise.
5) Transpose to other keys.


well said, I particularly like the bold. Knowing where the note is in the scale as very important.
#10
Hi,

Here are a few ideas:

1) Drone note or Chord

I pick 1 to 3 scale per day, if you can, have a drone chord played with you PC of a keybaord (say Em - E-G-B) and practice all the scales that would fit over it - that is Pentatonic Minor, G or Em scale, Em melodic...

2) Start on a different string the your usual staring point
Instead of starting your scale for the low E string, start on a different string.

3) Identifiy where the root, third and Fifth of the Root Chord are within each scale pattern, then do the same for the rest of the Chords that fit the scale your playing

to me, it is easier to remember something I use and more so, that I can use in context of a chord or a chord progression.

Have fun

DPC.
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis
I look at the notes and figure out what my options are for establishing a tonal center, and then compose with them.

i can just see you practicing man

pick up the guitar and stare at it thinking real hard for like 15 minutes to play a 4 note 6 note riff


you always say you never improvise, that just baffles me.

pretty much all of my influence comes from jam and improv

pink floyd wrote most of dark side of the moon improvising, just clearing my head and making shit up is how i write music. you seem to just completly neglect the art of jam
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Oct 15, 2008,
#12
If I practice 1 major scale a day and 1 minor scale a day, should I play a major scale and a relevant minor (ie C major and A minor), or corresponding minor (ie. C major and C minor)?
#14
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
i can just see you practicing man

pick up the guitar and stare at it thinking real hard for like 15 minutes to play a 4 note 6 note riff


you always say you never improvise, that just baffles me.

pretty much all of my influence comes from jam and improv

pink floyd wrote most of dark side of the moon improvising, just clearing my head and making shit up is how i write music. you seem to just completly neglect the art of jam


And you neglect the art of SATB scoring. What's your point?

It doesn't take 15 minutes to compose something with 4 notes in it when you have the theoretical knowledge of Archeo (ass or not).

Remember, in those 15 minutes he is hearing music and creating ideas in his head - it's not like he's wasting time before picking up the guitar. Every good guitarist has a brilliant musical imagination and vision.