#1
So, I have all the gloss of the original finish sanded off of my strat body (I didn't sand all the way to the wood, there is still color but it's sanded dull)

So, I heard to use Dupli-Color paints, which I'm assuming is this stuff.

Should I put primer on top of the original finish that I sanded dull, or am I okay without it?
I'm once again assuming it's the "Premium Sandable Primer" under the link above.

Does the color of the primer matter? (I will be painting the guitar black.)

Do I need to get any lacquers or Primer Sealers?

For the clear coat, do I use "DA 1692 Crystal Clear"? (Once again under the above link.) Or is there a special kind I should use?

Finally, does it matter if I use flat black or gloss black when the clear coat is going over it?
#2
You don't need to apply a sanding sealer/primer if it's smooth. Make sure the clearcoat is also Acrylic Lacquer (not Enamel) and you'll be fine. I don't understand the last question. The Clear is the last application and it's available in Satin/Matte, Semi-Glossy, or Glossy.

Good Luck!

#4
Quote by fartripper67
So, I have all the gloss of the original finish sanded off of my strat body (I didn't sand all the way to the wood, there is still color but it's sanded dull)

So, I heard to use Dupli-Color paints, which I'm assuming is this stuff.

Should I put primer on top of the original finish that I sanded dull, or am I okay without it?
I'm once again assuming it's the "Premium Sandable Primer" under the link above.

Does the color of the primer matter? (I will be painting the guitar black.)

Do I need to get any lacquers or Primer Sealers?

For the clear coat, do I use "DA 1692 Crystal Clear"? (Once again under the above link.) Or is there a special kind I should use?

Finally, does it matter if I use flat black or gloss black when the clear coat is going over it?


The question you should ask yourself is. "Do I want to do it properly, or not?"

Now your finish is sanded, that's good, you don't HAVE to go back to bare wood.

You want to make this surface as smooth (meaning bumps, holes etc) as possible.
This does not mean smooth and shiny.

Any chips, dents etc, should be filled with a suitable epoxy filler (car body filler), and sanded back.

Now what you want to do, is get some regular cheap Matt Black paint (or white if your guitar body is dark).

Spray a light dust coat over the guitar. This is called a "Guide Coat".

With 220 grit sand paper (dry) on a sanding block, go over the guitar to remove the black paint.

Any dips, etc, will now show up and you can choose to fill them and sand back.

The whole guitar should be sanded to 220 grit. Do not use fine 600 grit etc.

Get some Panel wipe and wipe the guitar over, using a dry cloth to wipe over it after applying the panel wipe.

Use gloves, do not touch the guitar with your bare hands as you will introduce skin oils, which are a contaminant.

Apply two coats of primer and allow it to FULLY CURE.

You can now do another guide coat if you wish, to double check you have no flaws.

If you have a good, all over primer finish, give it a quick sand to 220-300 grit.

You can now use a Primer Sealer if you wish.

This prevents your base coats and Primer bleeding through, which can happen with some colours. Top painters ALWAYS seal. It also uniforms the colour. Ideally, this coat will compliment your colour coat, dark for a dark colour, light for a light colour.

Sand this to 300-400 grit. Always use a block to sand but use your fingers carefully OVER the edges, not along.

Sand in an X pattern. Go one way across the guitar at an angle /////// then go the other way \\\\\\\\\\ . Do not sand in circles.

Now is the time to change any masking tape you are using on the guitar, to prevent an edge build up.

Wipe the guitar down with your Panel Wipe. Use a Mild "Final Wipe", not the harsh stuff. You should still have gloves on, no skin contact with the guitar.

Apply your base coats. Do 3 coats, leaving time in between (15 minutes or whatever) for the paint to FLASH, not DRY. Flashed paint is still tacky/sticky, but not wet.

Do not hold your spray can/gun (hopefully gun), miles away from the surface.
With a spray gun, I adjust it to give me good coverage at 4 inches from the guitar. You cannot do this with a spray can, so decide for yourself, what distance you need to be from the guitar, to give a good coat, but not a runny one.

If you are too far away, the paint will dry before it hits the body, this can be considered BAD.

Follow your paints directions regarding number of coats, probably two lots of the 3 as above will suffice.

If you are spraying a metallic finish, you will need to clear it within a certain time, do not sand a metallic finish that has not been lacquered.

If it's a regular paint, you can allow it to dry FULLY, then wet sand it to remove any orange peel and over spray. Do not do this every coat, it is a waste of time.

Then wipe down again with panel wipe, change masking tape etc.

You can then apply your clear coat. With clear, it is best to spray a mist coat over the guitar, wait a few minutes, then go on with 2-3 medium coats.

The first coat, just helps with adhesion, but do not let it dry.

Obviously, once you have finished clearing, it can be wet sanded and buffed.

However, do not rush it. Non 2 Pack (2k) paints, usually need weeks, yes weeks, 4 at least in room temperature, to cure.

If you try to sand, polish etc before that time is up, you are wasting your time and jeopardising your finish.

If you stick to one brand (like the ones you linked to) for all components, they should be compatible and work well together. As was said, you don't want to mix an Enamel and an Acrylic system.

If you are clear coating, then do not use anything from the "lacquer" heading on that page, other than the Clear Lacquer, you mentioned.

Colours should be regular paint, not lacquer or primer. If you just want it to be Gloss black all over, you could go for the Gloss Black under the "lacquer" heading, but you will find it harder to achieve a good finish.

Don't paint in the cold, 65-80 Degrees F. Get your guitar body warm, before you paint it. Keep dust etc away from it as much as is humanly possible.

It is of course, your choice, but you did ask for advice

So you want (ideally): Sandable Primer, Primer Sealer, Colours, Clear lacquer, latex gloves, mild panel wipe, abrasives.

Are you doing one colour or several colours, stripes, artwork etc?
Last edited by Skeet UK at Oct 15, 2008,
#6
Quote by fartripper67
Wow.

Thanks for that Skeet.


I was going to try to do one of these.



Simple this painting lark isn't it?