#1
I have this riff, I was wondering if you guys could tell me what key it is in, thanks.

E-----------------------------------
B-----------------------------------
G-------14------13------11------9---
D-----16------16------12------12----
A-9-16----9-16----9-12----9-12------
D-----------------------------------
Gear:
EBMM Bongo HS 4
EBMM Sting Ray 5
Eden D410T
Tech 21 Sansamp RBI
Tech 21 Sansamp RPM
Art 341 Dual Channel EQ
QSC GX5 Power Amp
#3
So I could use both the D and F# scales and I would be fine?

I'm trying to put some chords behind that riff there, so far I have...

E-2---5--
B-3---3--
G-2------
D-4---4--
A-5---5--
D-0---0--


I'm not to sure whatelse I could do.
Gear:
EBMM Bongo HS 4
EBMM Sting Ray 5
Eden D410T
Tech 21 Sansamp RBI
Tech 21 Sansamp RPM
Art 341 Dual Channel EQ
QSC GX5 Power Amp
Last edited by CNC-Digity at Oct 15, 2008,
#5
You can do a quick check with the "formula" for the harmonized minor scale.

Harmonized minor scale:
i ii° III iv v VI VII

Let's start by looking at the chord F# minor. Since there are three minor chords for every key, the F# minor chord exists in three different keys. To illustrate, here are those three minor keys, harmonized:


i   ii° III iv  v   VI  VII 
F#m G#° A   Bm  C#m D   E
Bm  C#° D   Em  F#m G   A
C#m D#° E   F#m G#m A   B


Since there is no D major chord in the harmonized C# minor scale, we can rule that key out. This means that there are two alternatives left, B minor and F# minor. It could be any of them since they both contain F#m and D, but you're not using any Bm chords so the logical conclusion would be F# minor.

Simply put, this means that you can use the F# minor scale to create lead lines and the chords stated above to create a progression.

If this confuses you then you should read one of the theory tutorials available on the net. I believe there are some here at UG.