#1
I Have been playing blues now for about 3 years and i usually practice 2 hours a day broken up accordingly:30 minutes for scales, and hour for blues licks, turnarounds, etc., and 30 minutes or so for analyzing songs. I have many blues books with backing tracks that i play to regularly using a ts-9, with a blues junior, and an 87 strat with texas specials. I play with different people to try to pick up on some different styles but feel like i am stuck not making progress. I have just recently purchased The Complete Rhythm Guitar Guide for Blues Bands by Larry McCabe to help me with my rhythm sectionand theory. I am also looking at getting a BOSS rc-2 looper to help with my rhythm and lead playing. Any ideas on what i can do differently to make more progress, or does this sound like a pretty good idea??? any help would be awesome thanks
#2
use your looper and lay down bass tracks, rhythm tracks, and then improvise over them.
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#4
this is my opinion but bear with me..it seems your too much of a 'by the book' guitar player. Instead of setting apart set amount of time for scales etc, would it not be best to learn and analysis as many different guitar players as possible? As well of that, get a band sorted.You'll be surprised how much playing with better musicians forces you to improve.
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#6
Ya, that sounds good. Ill alot more time to studying licks from an array of guitarists, instead of focusing so much on the scales. At least with blues studying the guitarists styles covers scales really anyway. My only problem is that as for blues and jazz musicians around my area; they seem to be few and far between. I can at least start by using a looper. Otherwise ill jam with whomever, whenever. It makes sense that it forces you to be better. Ive played with some jazz musicians it that sorta forced me to be better and pick up what they were doing
#8
i may do that or i could probably post something at school to if i run it by the student gov't
#10
ya, im 21. Ive done jam nights its fun and most helpful exspecially with musicians who are older then you. I am in college and not a music major and have played with music majors and teachers actually. Which helps alot expecially when im a biology major.
#11
i recently got a blues / funk band together with some kids from school, so far its goin great


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#12
Quote by jrmulley807
ya, im 21. Ive done jam nights its fun and most helpful exspecially with musicians who are older then you. I am in college and not a music major and have played with music majors and teachers actually. Which helps alot expecially when im a biology major.


You should just make friends with a few of the people from those music classes and put together a band. It doesn't have to be a band with set limits to songs, you can add improvs if they're all willing and if you end up playing live try and get someone to record it so you can listen back to things you're having trouble with or to get ideas from what you played on the night.
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#13
I think playing with other people is gonna be your best bet. That way you can play off of what other people are playing. Like the tone of the drums can be a guide for a certain solo or whatever. Jam tracks are useful, but tend to get boring and you end up doing the same stuff over them.