#1
Hi Everyone,
So I know what an interval is and well I know how to get a Perfect 5th of the scale that I'm in but what do Intervals really do for me? I understand that is a basic building block / measurement for music but how is this going to open up the broader Musical Theory door for me. The internet has some great here is what this is but nothing to really explain / explore the subject. Any help, sites, books that can broaden my knowledge / know how of intervals / triads would be great. Thanks.

Lank
My Gear:
Guitars: Vintage LP, Martin DX-1, Epi Viola Bass,
Amps: Marshall JMD501
Effects: Empty Set right now
#2
How do you propose one study music without knowing how notes relate to each other? Everything in music theory boils down to intervals.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
It's very important to know for purposes of chord structure. Chords are pretty meaningless if you don't know what they're made up of.
I <3 bangoodcharlotte

Quote by humperdunk
one time i let my cat has cheezburger. i thought it was pretty funny.
#4
i was teaching intervals today ,
we listened to a 5, a minor 6th , and a major 6th .
and felt these sounded similar to the james bond theme .
the 4th,major 3rd, and minor 3rd had a bit of a blues type feel to them .
6th's and 3rds are very melodic and romantic , where as 4ths and 5ths sound cool,baron , powerful and futuristic .
2nds and 7ths sound very dissonant , like they want to resolve , good for creating tension .
if you like any of these elements in your music there is a good chance you are using a lot of the related intervals .
where knowing them can help means you can create a certain mood by choosing your intervals in advance ...
#5
Hey wassap Lank! The study of intervals help you understand music across the board. Intervals are used everywhere in music from melody/harmony to chords.

Study of intervals label the distance between one note to the other.

Names like: root, minor 3rd, perfect 4th, dominant 7th etc.

the names help musicians communicate ideas to one another. ("yo lank can let's stack minor 3rds so we can get a diminished).
#6
So I get the idea of Intervals with a Scale and chord construction. I guess I'm thinking there should be more to it than just these two areas. My question is do you ever play like a minor 3rd and then a minor3rd of that previous minor 3rd? Do you play 3rds individually to maybe come up with a cool finger pick. I'm just kinda lost on what to do with intervals outside of figuring out a major / minor / aug / dim chord.

Lank
My Gear:
Guitars: Vintage LP, Martin DX-1, Epi Viola Bass,
Amps: Marshall JMD501
Effects: Empty Set right now
#7
Quote by lank81
So I get the idea of Intervals with a Scale and chord construction. I guess I'm thinking there should be more to it than just these two areas. My question is do you ever play like a minor 3rd and then a minor 3rd of that previous minor 3rd?
Yes, this happens all the time.
Do you play 3rds individually to maybe come up with a cool finger pick?
Yes.
I'm just kinda lost on what to do with intervals outside of figuring out a major / minor / aug / dim chord. Lank
When you were learning the alphabet you probably didn't have much of an idea how all those letters could work together, either. I urge you to take on faith that intervals are foundational to the study of music. They're not the whole story by any means, but they are as essential to the understanding of music as air is to your life. Well, maybe not that essential, but I hope you get the idea.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#8
Quote by gpb0216
Yes, this happens all the time.
Yes.
When you were learning the alphabet you probably didn't have much of an idea how all those letters could work together, either. I urge you to take on faith that intervals are foundational to the study of music. They're not the whole story by any means, but they are as essential to the understanding of music as air is to your life. Well, maybe not that essential, but I hope you get the idea.


I definitely get the idea. I've been searching the net for a lot of theory information but just get little snippets. cyberfrets.com seems like a pretty decent site and I've gotten some decent information but do you know of any good sites / books with a more rounded and detailed set of lessons? Thanks.
My Gear:
Guitars: Vintage LP, Martin DX-1, Epi Viola Bass,
Amps: Marshall JMD501
Effects: Empty Set right now
#9
Quote by ibanez1511
i was teaching intervals today ,
we listened to a 5, a minor 6th , and a major 6th .
and felt these sounded similar to the james bond theme .
the 4th,major 3rd, and minor 3rd had a bit of a blues type feel to them .
6th's and 3rds are very melodic and romantic , where as 4ths and 5ths sound cool,baron , powerful and futuristic .
2nds and 7ths sound very dissonant , like they want to resolve , good for creating tension .
if you like any of these elements in your music there is a good chance you are using a lot of the related intervals .
where knowing them can help means you can create a certain mood by choosing your intervals in advance ...

I love 2nd intervals!! They sound so dissonant like Stravinsky's stuff...

I'm not a big fan of 3rds, too soft and perfect sounding... Similar with 5ths... I don't like that much perfection!!

But yeah, intervals is where everything else. Use the right intervals and you can write a punk song, to a very bluesy song to a dissonant demonic sound!
Its all in the intervals!!
Its how Adam Jones manages to create 10,000 different melodies from just one drop D tuned guitar!!
#10
Check out the start of Blackbird by the Beatles. This is a simple finger picking that uses repetitive interval patterns. If you count 10ths as 3rds then the whole start of the song is just playing through a simple ascending run using 3rds.

Intervals help you analyse songs and understand what is going on and what makes something effective. You can look at a piece and say wow that sounds awesome. Then you can look at the intervals that make it effective and try working out different ways of using the same idea with different chords shapes in different keys and different places around the fretboard.

A good lick will often be harmonized with the same lick played in diatonic thirds or perfect fifths above the original riff to give it a fuller or more powerful sound. Led Zep does this often.

Double stops are just intervals. Look at the following part of Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here intro solo as an example. It's almost entirely made up of P4 intervals apart from the final interval on the open G and B strings which is a M3
e|3s5--3----------------------
b|3s5--3--3s5--3---3s5-5s3-0
g|--------2s4--2-0-2s4-4s2-0


Try applying your theory by doing some interval studies. Play through a scale position in different diatonic intervals. Play them melodically like this:
e.g. Melodic Diatonic Thirds in C major scale
|----------------|----------------|----------5---7-|5-8-------------|
|----------------|--------------5-|--6-5-8-6---8---|----------------|   Then
|----------------|------5---7-5---|7---------------|----------------|   the
|----------5---7-|5-9-7-9---------|----------------|----------------|   same
|--7-5-8-7---8---|----------------|----------------|----------------|  thing
|8---------------|----------------|----------------|----------------|descending


You might also play the same thing harmonically.

Or work through the key on specific strings as in the following example
e.g. Diatonic thirds on G and B strings in Am played harmonically
|----------------------|-----------------|----------------|----------------|
|1-3-5-6-8-10-12-13-12-|10-8-6-5-3-1-----|----------------|----------------|
|2-4-5-7-9-10-12-14-12-|10-9-7-5-4-2-----|----------------|----------------|
|----------------------|-----------------|----------------|----------------|
|----------------------|-----------------|----------------|----------------|
|----------------------|-----------------|----------------|----------------|

Do this kind of thing with all your intervals and in as many different ways as you can possibly think up.

Get creative with them and see what sort of musical ideas you can come up with.

Good Luck.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Oct 15, 2008,
#11
20Tigers,
Great examples. That definitely sheds the light for me. I'm very mathematical in my thinking so information like this really totally helps break the clouds and shed light on the situation. I'll definitely work on this stuff and search for more holy grail "interval" information.

Thanks,
Lank

Quote by 20Tigers
Check out the start of Blackbird by the Beatles. This is a simple finger picking that uses repetitive interval patterns. If you count 10ths as 3rds then the whole start of the song is just playing through a simple ascending run using 3rds.

Intervals help you analyse songs and understand what is going on and what makes something effective. You can look at a piece and say wow that sounds awesome. Then you can look at the intervals that make it effective and try working out different ways of using the same idea with different chords shapes in different keys and different places around the fretboard.

A good lick will often be harmonized with the same lick played in diatonic thirds or perfect fifths above the original riff to give it a fuller or more powerful sound. Led Zep does this often.

Double stops are just intervals. Look at the following part of Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here intro solo as an example. It's almost entirely made up of P4 intervals apart from the final interval on the open G and B strings which is a M3
e|3s5--3----------------------
b|3s5--3--3s5--3---3s5-5s3-0
g|--------2s4--2-0-2s4-4s2-0


Try applying your theory by doing some interval studies. Play through a scale position in different diatonic intervals. Play them melodically like this:
e.g. Melodic Diatonic Thirds in C major scale
|----------------|----------------|----------5---7-|5-8-------------|
|----------------|--------------5-|--6-5-8-6---8---|----------------| Then
|----------------|------5---7-5---|7---------------|----------------| the
|----------5---7-|5-9-7-9---------|----------------|----------------| same
|--7-5-8-7---8---|----------------|----------------|----------------| thing
|8---------------|----------------|----------------|----------------|descending


You might also play the same thing harmonically.

Or work through the key on specific strings as in the following example
e.g. Diatonic thirds on G and B strings in Am played harmonically
|----------------------|-----------------|----------------|----------------|
|1-3-5-6-8-10-12-13-12-|10-8-6-5-3-1-----|----------------|----------------|
|2-4-5-7-9-10-12-14-12-|10-9-7-5-4-2-----|----------------|----------------|
|----------------------|-----------------|----------------|----------------|
|----------------------|-----------------|----------------|----------------|
|----------------------|-----------------|----------------|----------------|

Do this kind of thing with all your intervals and in as many different ways as you can possibly think up.

Get creative with them and see what sort of musical ideas you can come up with.

Good Luck.
My Gear:
Guitars: Vintage LP, Martin DX-1, Epi Viola Bass,
Amps: Marshall JMD501
Effects: Empty Set right now
#12
Good for you lank that your wanting to learn more about music theory, however I would urge caution in taking all the information on Cyberfret (or any other website) as fact, take the info with a pinch of salt until you can back it up with another source. I remember when I was first starting out I learned the Major pentatonic, and the interval equations were different on two different sites!

Intervals really do begin to switch on light bulbs in your head after a while of working with them, especially with chords.