#1
Not the most informative title, I know. Couldn't really think of anything better though >.>
So the other day my Guitar teacher taught me a little riff that followed a G C chord progression.

G
-------3---------5---------7-----
-----------------------------------
--3/4-----4/5------5/7---------
-----------------------------------
-----------------------------------
-----------------------------------

C
-----8---------10-----------12----
-------------------------------------
8/9-----9/10------10/12---------
-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------

My question is one that can probably be answered fairly easily. Why does this work? The only thing I've really learned about in any detail is chords and arpeggios, and this is definitely not an arpeggio. So what is it?
#2
While playing the G...you would be playing the G Major Scale...with a chromatic (3rd fret-g string).

For the C....you would be playing the C Major Scale...with a chromatic (8th fret-g string).


It's just changing the scale when you change chords. Play the G scale with the G chord, and play the C scale with the C chord. You could also do the same if you added a D chord in there. Just play the same pattern but play it in the D Major Scale.


Look for some info on Major Diatonic Patterns, and learn all the patterns.


I hope this helps.
#3
Quote by TheK3vin
Not the most informative title, I know. Couldn't really think of anything better though >.>
So the other day my Guitar teacher taught me a little riff that followed a G C chord progression.


-------3---------5---------7-----
-----------------------------------
--3/4-----4/5------5/7---------
-----------------------------------
-----------------------------------
-----------------------------------


-----8---------10-----------12----
-------------------------------------
8/9-----9/10------10/12---------
-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------

My question is one that can probably be answered fairly easily. Why does this work? The only thing I've really learned about in any detail is chords and arpeggios, and this is definitely not an arpeggio. So what is it?


Well, technically it IS arpeggios, and therefore chords. Look at the notes, you'll see they'll fit into barre chords, namely

      G          Am        Bm    
-------3---------5---------7-------
-----------------------------------
--3/4-----4/5------5/7-------------
-----------------------------------
-----------------------------------
-----------------------------------

     C         Dm           Em
-----8---------10-----------12------
-------------------------------------
8/9-----9/10------10/12--------------
-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------


Basically you're ascending up the chords of the key you're in, namely G major - but you're just playing one interval from each chord, namely an inverted third.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Oct 16, 2008,
#4
First, thanks
Second, ClassAxe. I know all of the Major and Minor scale patterns, as well as all of the corresponding chord shapes, etc. So my next question is this. How would I do a pattern like this on a minor scale? I played around with it a bit, but I couldn't get it to work. For instance, I tried to use E minor starting on the 12th fret, and using the 10th 12th and 14th fret on the E string, the 10th 12th and 13th on the B, and the 9th, 11th, and 12th on the G. But it all sounds terrible. Anyone care to share some insight on this?
#5
Sorry bro, I hope I didn't come across as an a$$, I just didn't know if you knew the scales or not

Actually that's a MAJOR type pattern (at least I think it is). It won't work well over minor chords. But it will work with an Emaj chord....at the 12th position.

Here's something that might help with minor stuff.........http://guitar.about.com/library/weekly/aa030800c.htm

Here's the full article..........http://guitar.about.com/library/weekly/aa030800a.htm


Here's a lick using the inversions from that article...

Emin

E |---------7----------12-----------15-----
B |-------------------------------------------
G |----7/9-------9/12-------12/16--------
Last edited by ClassAxe at Oct 17, 2008,
#6
Quote by TheK3vin
First, thanks
Second, ClassAxe. I know all of the Major and Minor scale patterns, as well as all of the corresponding chord shapes, etc. So my next question is this. How would I do a pattern like this on a minor scale? I played around with it a bit, but I couldn't get it to work. For instance, I tried to use E minor starting on the 12th fret, and using the 10th 12th and 14th fret on the E string, the 10th 12th and 13th on the B, and the 9th, 11th, and 12th on the G. But it all sounds terrible. Anyone care to share some insight on this?


Just use the chord progression from whatever key you're in, for E minor your chords are

Em F#dim G Am Bm C D

so to do the same lick in inverted third just go up the progression playing the notes on the G and E strings in exactly the same way, you're just following different chords.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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