#1
So I've been playing guitar for about four years now, and my father has decided that he would like to learn how to play as well. I went and got him a good Yamaha acoustic for me to teach him on.

Now, I've taught a few people the basics on learning how to play before, but this time around it's very different. My father seems to have extremely large fingertips, along with a lot of extra skin on the bottoms of his fingers. This is making it extremely difficult for him to position his fingers to play chords without muting the other strings around his fingertips. It is extremely frustrating for both of us, and since this is a genetic thing that he cannot control, we've decide to look about for a solution to this problem.

So here is my question. Are there any guitars that have wider than normal fretboards for people with this type of problem? Or is there something else we should do?
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#2
Classical guitars have wider fretboards, so he could play that instead of steel-string I guess? Sorry that's all I can think of...
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#3
Quote by xenophon979
Classical guitars have wider fretboards, so he could play that instead of steel-string I guess? Sorry that's all I can think of...


This.

AND/OR make him practice painfully slow and very accurate. The more he practices like that, the easier it will get. I had the same problem. There are always ways, he just has to find his.
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#4
I have fat fingers too, practice is the only solution.

It took about a year (it sounds pitiful) for my fingers to get in every position the right way without muting any strings, but it pays off in the long run.

Just be glad he's not legally blind like Johnny Hiland, and has fat fingers.
#5
Try Seagull guitars. Though Ive never played one, Ive heard that they have wider fretboards. Another option would be to buy a 12 string and remove the octave strings.
#6
Quote by tom183
Another option would be to buy a 12 string and remove the octave strings.


Try this. It'll be better than classical because it's steel strings (that is, unless he wants to play classical music).
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