#1
Alright i just have one thing i would like to ask, i currently own a Epi Les Paul custom. It is a great guitar i love it to death. But it is flippin impossible to get my hand around this beast in the upper registers... And from pictures it looks like the Gibsons are exactly the same way... So what id like to know are there any Les Pauls that they have designed in a manner that actually makes the higher frets practical to use?
#2
I own a Gibson Les Paul... but I have no problem reaching the upper frets... It could be my freakishly huge hands.

Or that my guitar just loves me more?

I'm unsure.
#3
well I've played my friends 1960 Gibson les paul today and had NO trouble reaching the upper frets besides when i stood up.

I dont know how you could get a problem like that.
#4
I have no problem with getting up to the 22nd fret with my index finger, even on the LPs wit 50s necks, with my SG it's even easier.
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
#5
The new LP Axcess has a contoured cutaway so you can reach the higher frets. Maybe try one of those.
It's a product of the design, though. If you're used to an SG or an Ibanez or whatnot with two big cutaways it's going to take a little practice to reach the high frets.
#6
Get a Double Cut Les Paul?
Gear:
95' Fender Richie Sambora Standard Stratocaster
06' Symphony SD54
07' Epiphone Les Paul Custom Plus
08' Recording King RD-17CFE
Fender G-DEC30
Line 6 POD XT
Blackstar Series One 45 Combo
10' Ernie Ball MusicMan JP6 BFR
#7
Hmm who knows ill have to go fiddle with some actual Gibson LP's. Although The LP double cut is the complete opposite there isn't a fret on that thing thats any challenge to reach, i wish they all were like that! (Ninja Edit) Ya i really dig the Double cuts, i play my friends 24 fret LP DC all the time and im in love, But the one downside me and my friend have noticed is my Epi has a ton more sustain than his DC...

Oh and thanks Roc thats the kind of thing i was looking for!
Last edited by m_Soares at Oct 16, 2008,
#8
Quote by Roc8995

It's a product of the design, though. If you're used to an SG or an Ibanez or whatnot with two big cutaways it's going to take a little practice to reach the high frets.


I fail to see why the top cutaway would be relevant if you are holding your guitar in anything slightly resembling the proper way.
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
#9
^Some of us use our thumb to fret the bass strings occasionally, and/or use it for leverage for bigger bends. The top cutaway would be an issue in this case if you have smaller hands or shorter fingers, or if you're used to playing with a more "open" hand- that is, fingers a bit more perpendicular to the neck.
From what I know, it's perfectly decent form to play with your thumb around the neck unless you're playing classical or flamenco.
#10
Quote by Roc8995
^Some of us use our thumb to fret the bass strings occasionally, and/or use it for leverage for bigger bends.
From what I know, it's perfectly decent form to play with your thumb around the neck unless you're playing classical or flamenco.


I can understand doing that on lower end of the neck, but not up near the 22nd fret, and it's still bad form, common, and occasionally useful but generally bad form.
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
#11
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
I can understand doing that on lower end of the neck, but not up near the 22nd fret, and it's still bad form, common, and occasionally useful but generally bad form.

There you go. It's more comfortable to me to keep my hand a bit perpendicular to the neck, even all the way up there. My fingers don't like the angle and for me it doesn't make sense to drastically alter my playing when I hit the higher registers.
Form has never been a real driving force behind most rock music anyway. It's good to have, but at some point it's about rocking the hell out and who cares what you're thumb is doing if you're at least halfway competent.
#13
Quote by Roc8995
There you go. It's more comfortable to me to keep my hand a bit perpendicular to the neck, even all the way up there. My fingers don't like the angle and for me it doesn't make sense to drastically alter my playing when I hit the higher registers.
Form has never been a real driving force behind most rock music anyway. It's good to have, but at some point it's about rocking the hell out and who cares what you're thumb is doing if you're at least halfway competent.


Umm proper technique should keep the palm of your hand perpindicular to the neck and your fingertips perpendicular to the fretboard, and obviously you should care about what your thumb is doing if you are having trouble reaching the higher frets because of it getting in the way.
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm