#1
Are harmonics assocaited with a note? For example, if I play the harmonic on the 12th fret E string, would it be an E? Silly question I know, but I wasnt sure.
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#2
On the twelfth fret, its the same note as a fretted 12th fret. Or it should be at least. If its not, your intonation is off. As far as other frets, im not so sure, but i doubt it is.
#4
Quote by Ktool The Girth
I play the harmonic on the 12th fret E string, would it be an E?.



Yes it will be an E, but in a higher register.
Last edited by jsantos at Oct 16, 2008,
#5
Quote by jsantos
Yes it will be an E, but in a higher register.

This applies to every harmonic placement. Its the note but several registers higher.


not really dude. is the 5th fret harmonic on the e string an a? naw it's an e.
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#6
Short answer yes. A harmonic at the 12th fret on an E string will be an E. As will the harmonic on the fifth fret. The harmonic at the seventh fret will be a B.
The harmonic on the fifth fret of the E string, the seventh fret of the A, and 12th fret of the high e string will be the same E. I use these harmonics to tune my guitar. Sometimes it's good to hear them in different octaves too like the 12th fret low E and the seventh fret A.

When a string is plucked it vibrates in numerous different ways. Each of these different vibrations gives a different harmonic overtone. I liked the way they look vibrating together or individually. Check out these good vibrations.

For an explanation of harmonics check out wiki's harmonic page

Quote by qotsa1998
On the twelfth fret, its the same note as a fretted 12th fret. Or it should be at least. If its not, your intonation is off.
+1 excellent point.
Use a tuner to check they are the same and if you have an adjustable bridge you can adjust the length of your string to correct intonation problems.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Oct 16, 2008,
#7
Quote by aetherspear
not really dude. is the 5th fret harmonic on the e string an a? naw it's an e.


oh my bad, I meant on the 12 fret
#8
from the allmight Mattias IA Eklundh
http://www.freakguitar.com/licks.html <- handy little chart on the left


theres some math behind it
if you divide the length of the string into X parts, the frequency will be X times higher
and the ratio between any two notes that are a semi tone apart is 2^(1/12):1 (at least in equal temperament)

and if you calculate a bit, the harmonic overtones you get on a string are:
open string - the fundamental note
12th fret natural harmonic - an octave above the fundamental
7th fret n.h. - an octave + a fifth
5th fret n.h. - 2 octaves
4th fret - 2 octaves + a major third (and I think this one is slightly out of tune)
3.2th fret - 2 octaves + a fifth
and I suck at playing any of the higher ones
#9
Quote by seljer



12th fret natural harmonic - an octave above the fundamental
7th fret n.h. - an octave + a fifth
5th fret n.h. - 2 octaves



yes
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#10
Quote by seljer
and if you calculate a bit, the harmonic overtones you get on a string are:
open string - the fundamental note
12th fret natural harmonic - an octave above the fundamental
7th fret n.h. - an octave + a fifth
5th fret n.h. - 2 octaves
4th fret - 2 octaves + a major third (and I think this one is slightly out of tune) - it's in tune in just intonation, out in even temperment.
3.2th fret - 2 octaves + a fifth
and I suck at playing any of the higher ones


This is all correct, and applies to all harmonics.

ie, a pinch harmonic at the 5th fret at the equivalent of the 10th fret or the 29th will come out 2 octaves higher.

I did a coupla vids on this for the AT FAQ.
#11
I use these harmonics to tune my guitar.


I would advise against that. The guitar is not meant to be tuned to perfect intervals. Tuning your guitar that way will result in other intervals being thrown out of tune.
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#12
Quote by Archeo Avis
I would advise against that. The guitar is not meant to be tuned to perfect intervals. Tuning your guitar that way will result in other intervals being thrown out of tune.
Really? Are you sure? Care to back that up with some fact, cause, I'm not trying to be an ass, but it sounds like a load of shit to me.

EDIT: No need. I have done some initial looking around and apparently you might be right.

Still, it works for me. What I didn't mention was that I also use three other ways of tuning my guitar depending on how I feel and what i'm playing. And if I have a reliable tuner handy I usually use that to tune up. - And when I'm playing with other people I always use a tuner and make sure they do too.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Oct 16, 2008,
#13
As far as I'm aware tuning to octave harmonics is OK, the others are all out by a few cents from even temperament (or if you prefer, the tempered intervals are out from the perfect intervals but for the octaves.)