#1
my friend just broke his bass string, and is going to guitar center tomorrow and has no replacements. can it mess up the bass at all to leave it missing a string for a day? (its the A string if that helps)
#2
man i left my B string off for a day.

Taking all strings off is worse than missing just your A string
www.myspace.com/nirvana_rox_ryda_j

Quote by Ovenman
Women don't sh*t.
There's no toilet in the kitchen.


Quote by Yan Yan
!

This thread was made back when i had my old 06 account.

#3
tune all of them a little bit sharp... that way it will have more tension, hopefully not disrupting the kneck. The problem with this is you could break another string. But im sure one night wouldnt hurt, but i wouldnt know. im mainly a guitar player
#4
No, it won't harm the instrument.
Do you feel warm within your cage?

And have you figured out yet -


Life goes by?
Quote by Hydra150
There's a dick on Earth, too
It's you
#5
it won't harm the bass, but it will harm the children, and I for one love the children.


I love the children...
Quote by brandonian
you nose started bleeding, so the first thing you do is post it on UG? i don't understand the reasoning behind that one my friend



Quote by unplugtheradio
screw grammar i practice economic typing.
#6
If you're only leaving one string off the bass then it most likely will not hurt the bass at all.
#7
Please please stop these old wives tales. I recently took my both my Basses apart; these being a Stingray 5 and a G&L L2500 and then transported them by sea in packing cases to Cyprus where it got very hot and humid.
On their arrival I merely reassembled them both and used them all summer, on our return I sent one back in a packing case and took the other in two suitcases with our clothes (neck in one case body in the other).
That is twice broken down and reassembled in 5 months as well a being used in a hot humid climate.
So the answer is it shouldn't affect your bass ulnless there is a fault in the construction/materials.
My Stingray 5 was only a few weeks old (confirmed by dates on neck and body) when I bought it in Nashville and brought it back to the UK by the same method.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#8
No, nothing will happen. If you took your strings off and threw it in the closet for a few years, yeah there would be warpage from lack of tension, but taking them temporarily won't harm it.

I used to do it all the time and my necks were absolutly fine.
#9
Uhhhh... I've had strings off one of my basses for a year and the neck was fine.
Where do you guys come up with this stuff?
Quote by brandooon
Buy both pickups. Rub icyhot on both of them. Sandwich your penis between them and walk to the nearest homeless shelter with your brand new icyhot penis sandwich.
#10
Quote by Bathory fan
No, nothing will happen. If you took your strings off and threw it in the closet for a few years, yeah there would be warpage from lack of tension, but taking them temporarily won't harm it.

I used to do it all the time and my necks were absolutly fine.

Warpage is where the neck twists not bends, this can occur with strings on.
If you look down the neck when the strings are on and then when you've removed them you will see that in most cases the neck now has a slight backwards bow not warp.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#11
Quote by John Swift
Warpage is where the neck twists not bends, this can occur with strings on.
If you look down the neck when the strings are on and then when you've removed them you will see that in most cases the neck now has a slight backwards bow not warp.



Having them off for an extended period of time will cause the neck to backbow/warp, because there is nothing there counteract the truss rod, right?

Thats what happened when one bloke i know 'stored' his bass by taking off the strings, cased it up and throwing it in the basement. Next spriing the neck was warped horribly.
#12
Quote by Bathory fan
Having them off for an extended period of time will cause the neck to backbow/warp, because there is nothing there counteract the truss rod, right?

Thats what happened when one bloke i know 'stored' his bass by taking off the strings, cased it up and throwing it in the basement. Next spriing the neck was warped horribly.


Backbow is not the same as warping- backbow is completely natural when you take the strings off- necks are meant to be flexible.

Warping is also a natural part of a neck's life- it happens to every neck eventually. Even different cuts of the same wood will react differently to humidity and temperature changes- just like when that bloke threw it in the basement- basements are cold and therefore the wood will contract. Warping is a reaction within the wood- not the absence of tension. Taking the strings off will cause warping is a complete myth.
#13
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Backbow is not the same as warping- backbow is completely natural when you take the strings off- necks are meant to be flexible.

Warping is also a natural part of a neck's life- it happens to every neck eventually. Even different cuts of the same wood will react differently to humidity and temperature changes- just like when that bloke threw it in the basement- basements are cold and therefore the wood will contract. Warping is a reaction within the wood- not the absence of tension. Taking the strings off will cause warping is a complete myth.



So i guess "warping" is more like the neck twisting because of the rapid climate changes then, right?
#14
^not really that rapid its not anything to really worry about. it might change quicker if it goes through a heck of a lot of climate changes. also certain amounts of tension but a standard tuned instrument shouldnt have any problems for a good couple of years.


Quote by Woogles
Uhhhh... I've had strings off one of my basses for a year and the neck was fine.
Where do you guys come up with this stuff?


when guitarist might come here and when people who are still kind new or have never had that problem before. also hearing about warp bending and the dont fully understand it.
blemonese of the Bass Militia, PM Nutter_101 to join
Quote by camhussynec
Its like getting anal for the first time. It hurts like hell but eventully ull get used to it and itll feel fine

Thanks for nothing
Last edited by matosh.lee at Oct 17, 2008,
#15
Quote by Bathory fan
So i guess "warping" is more like the neck twisting because of the rapid climate changes then, right?


Warping is ANY reaction in the wood- as I said, it'll happen to all necks eventually, even if they are stored in perfect conditions. The problem is that wood is unpredictable. The general rule of thumb is that a straighter grained wood warps less than uneven grained wood (like birdseye maple, flamed maple etc), but even so, you may find a straight grain warp long before an uneven grain still. Necks are quartersawn, which keeps the grain nice and flat as possible, and then dried for at least 12 years. Moist wood warps quicker than dry wood. I'd like to quote a very wise man here:

Quote by Dr. Cox
In a hospital, all we do is stall death


That's essentially what the above (quatersawing etc) is doing for necks- stalling the warping.
#16
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Warping is ANY reaction in the wood- as I said, it'll happen to all necks eventually, even if they are stored in perfect conditions. The problem is that wood is unpredictable. The general rule of thumb is that a straighter grained wood warps less than uneven grained wood (like birdseye maple, flamed maple etc), but even so, you may find a straight grain warp long before an uneven grain still. Necks are quartersawn, which keeps the grain nice and flat as possible, and then dried for at least 12 years. Moist wood warps quicker than dry wood. I'd like to quote a very wise man here:


That's essentially what the above (quatersawing etc) is doing for necks- stalling the warping.



What if you had a laqured or nitro-finished neck? like on Schecters, would that prevent the wood from soaking up moisture and possible stop[ or prevent warping? Seems to me that the older necks, that sometimes had "glazed" shiny over neck finishes are way less likely to warp or bow out then the unfished stuff.
#17
Quote by Bathory fan
What if you had a laqured or nitro-finished neck? like on Schecters, would that prevent the wood from soaking up moisture and possible stop[ or prevent warping? Seems to me that the older necks, that sometimes had "glazed" shiny over neck finishes are way less likely to warp or bow out then the unfished stuff.


For the third time- warping is a natural process that will happen to ALL necks eventually. Finish may or may not be a factor, I don't know. Warping WILL happen though.
#18
i think its with certain finishes you can tell when it starts to warp cause it cracks the finish. i think ive seen that on my friends guitar or bass.
blemonese of the Bass Militia, PM Nutter_101 to join
Quote by camhussynec
Its like getting anal for the first time. It hurts like hell but eventully ull get used to it and itll feel fine

Thanks for nothing
#19
Quote by Bathory fan
Having them off for an extended period of time will cause the neck to backbow/warp, because there is nothing there counteract the truss rod, right? .

If you take off the strings 99.99% of necks will show a back bow due to the truss rods countering of the string tension when the Bass is strung and in tune, warp and bend are two different things bend is bend and warp is twist, my 65 Jazz Bass had no warp (dictionary :- Crooked) at all nor has my late friends 1962 Precision.
The reason why Maple is the prefered timber for guitar/Bass necks is that it is a very stable type of timber that is why it is also the prefered timber used on sprung dance floors.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
Last edited by John Swift at Oct 19, 2008,
#20
Quote by matosh.lee
i think its with certain finishes you can tell when it starts to warp cause it cracks the finish. i think ive seen that on my friends guitar or bass.
Shrinkage can also cause cracks to appear this usualy takes place over a very long periof of time if the wood is well seasoned.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#21
Quote by Bathory fan
Having them off for an extended period of time will cause the neck to backbow/warp, because there is nothing there counteract the truss rod, right?

Thats what happened when one bloke i know 'stored' his bass by taking off the strings, cased it up and throwing it in the basement. Next spriing the neck was warped horribly.


Haha. It was more than likely a result of the basement's environment. Necks bowing beyond the natural flex of the truss rod due to 'lack of tension' is, in my experience with storing unstringed basses and in talking with people who have done likewise, little more than a rumor.