#1
alright, this is something ive been pondering for a while, and i am gonna ask for some help on.

how would i go about determining what chord progression to use with a specific scale/mode?

for example, lets say i have written a lead already, and i want to add the chords to have a complete song. say the lead is written using the C major scale/Ionian Mode.

the only idea ive had is that the chords to use should be made out of the notes of the mode or scale. since the C major scale/ionian mode is made of the notes C D E F G A B, the chords should be made using these notes.


any help out there?

ps: i know some people make the chord progressions first then the lead second, but i actually have a solo that needs a song.

edit: i know its possible to look up what progression goes with what mode/scale, but i was hoping to be able to determine them myself as opposed to relying on looking them up.
Last edited by SpeedLives at Oct 18, 2008,
#2
I've done this a few times, and it's harder than going the other way. What I first do is figure out what scale I'm using and what the appropriate tonic is (ie find the key). After that, I start looking at what notes fall on downbeats or anticipated downbeats (I don't know the official term). When you've figured out those notes, see which chords contain those notes. Use those chords in some kind of logical, though I hope creative, way. Run with that.

I think "Song 1" in my profile is one where I did this; it's whatever song that starts with a drumroll kind-of-thing and then a lead. I wrote the lead and thought, "Wow, that's cool. How can I use it?" I figured out that I was clearly in F#m and then started figuring out what notes fell on the downbeats and how often I wanted there to be a new chord; it's clearly not every beat that I change chords. Anyway, I got the process above from writing that song.
#3
my knowledge of theory is all over the place (missing some basics, some advanced stuff covered, etc).

remind me what downbeats are? thats like the second or fourth beat or something right.

edit: was my idea was somewhat correct then? also, i am open to any way of finding the right chord/mode combination. if someone knows another way, please tell me.
Last edited by SpeedLives at Oct 18, 2008,
#4
go on youtube.

there are two videos i found the other day of joe satriani going through different modes and talking about what sort of chords to use. just search for "satriani modes" and it'll be top of the list.

hope this helps
Strats -> Twin = sexwaves
#5
it would, but i have dial up so youtube can't happen for me.

thanks for the suggestion though.
#6
Think this is what your asking for

MAJ MIN MIN MAJ MAJ MIN MINb5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

C D E F G A B


Thats the chords for the C Major scale. You can use that technique for every key, for minor keys just start with chord 6. Chord 5 on the major is dominant.

Hope this helps
#8
Write out the notes in the scale and pick out 3 notes, going in 3rds, to build each chord. Build each chord off each note.

C Ionian: C D E F G A B

If you pick out 3 notes, going in 3rds, you get: (C) D (E) F (G) A B

So you know the first chord is: C, E, G

Move up one note and build a chord to get the 2nd chord in the scale, so:

C (D) E (F) G (A) B

The 2nd chord is: D, F, A


Do that for all 7 chords and then you get:

CEG
DFA
EGB
FAC
GBD
ACE
BDF

Now you have to find out what kind of chords those are. You do that by thinking of each chord as separate. Look at the root note of each chord and build the major scale off of them and then compare the notes in the chord to the notes in the major scale of the root note.

C major: C, D, E, F, G, A, B
chord: C E G
The intervals are just 1, 3, 5 which makes a major chord. That means the first chord in C Ionian is C major

D major: D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#
chord: D F A
The intervals are different here. The chord has a b3. That means the second chord in C Ionian is D minor.


Just do that for all the notes to get all 7 chords.
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#9
[quote="'[Dan"]']Think this is what your asking for

MAJ MIN MIN MAJ MAJ MIN MINb5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

C D E F G A B


Thats the chords for the C Major scale. You can use that technique for every key, for minor keys just start with chord 6. Chord 5 on the major is dominant.

Hope this helps

thank you, i will keep this in a safe place for reference.


Quote by metal4all
Write out the notes in the scale and pick out 3 notes, going in 3rds, to build each chord. Build each chord off each note.

C Ionian: C D E F G A B

If you pick out 3 notes, going in 3rds, you get: (C) D (E) F (G) A B

So you know the first chord is: C, E, G

Move up one note and build a chord to get the 2nd chord in the scale, so:

C (D) E (F) G (A) B

The 2nd chord is: D, F, A


Do that for all 7 chords and then you get:

CEG
DFA
EGB
FAC
GBD
ACE
BDF

Now you have to find out what kind of chords those are. You do that by thinking of each chord as separate. Look at the root note of each chord and build the major scale off of them and then compare the notes in the chord to the notes in the major scale of the root note.

C major: C, D, E, F, G, A, B
chord: C E G
The intervals are just 1, 3, 5 which makes a major chord. That means the first chord in C Ionian is C major

D major: D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#
chord: D F A
The intervals are different here. The chord has a b3. That means the second chord in C Ionian is D minor.


Just do that for all the notes to get all 7 chords.


alright, here was my attempt at finding what the third chord could be

E major: E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#
chord: E G B
the third chord could be E7 or Em7?

i know basic chord construction (and i have the "learning music theory: the beginning" guide open), but im not 100% sure.

anyone tell me whether im right or wrong? if im wrong, please show me where, see reasoning below

E7 = 1-3-5-b7 = E-G#-B-Db
Em = 1-b3-5-b7 = E-G-B-D
#10
Quote by SpeedLives
E7 = 1-3-5-b7 = E-G#-B-D
Em7 = 1-b3-5-b7 = E-G-B-D
Db=C# in the E major scale and would therefore be a sixth. D is the 7th.

Moreover, if the chord contains a D note, it is Em7, not Em.

The bold is me.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Db=C# in the E major scale and would therefore be a sixth. D is the 7th.

Moreover, if the chord contains a D note, it is Em7, not Em.

The bold is me.


i meant to put Em7, i did the first time ("the third chord could be E7 or Em7?"), but my computer froze every time i tried to edit my post.

so Em7 is correct then?