#1
Hey, I made a thread a few months back about buying a lefty 12 string acoustic. I had settled on http://www.seagullguitars.com/productcoastcedar12.htm and it seemed like no one had any qualms about it, so I went with it. Well now the company is just jerking me around, and still hasn't made my guitar for me yet. They keep adding a week again and again to the date when they say it'll be finished and frankly, I'm tired of that shit.

So I'm looking around for other guitars in the $500 dollar price range and I found http://cgi.ebay.com/Simon-Patrick-SP12A3T-Lefty-Acoustic-12-String-Guitar_W0QQitemZ150299531035QQcmdZViewItem?hash=item150299531035&_trkparms=72%3A1234|39%3A1|66%3A2|65%3A12|240%3A1318&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14 which looks pretty good to me, but I don't know much about these things. My concern is that the electronics in the instrument, while may be useful, might possibly interfere with the sound of the unplugged acoustic. Are my fears unfounded? My other questions to you all is, do you think this is a good replacement? Which guitar would you choose regardless of the circumstances?
#2
You may(or may not) have any better luck getting the lefty 12 string from Simon & Patrick than you are with Seagull. They're the same company you see. Each is a child company of Godin, based up in Canada. Personally, I'd wait for the Seagull, as it'll be a bit higher quality than the S&P.
I'm in the same boat as you, in that it's very difficult to find quality 12 string acoustics for lefty's. Thus the reason I don't own one yet. So, I'm saving, and saving, and saving, and when I get enough, I'm ordering one just for me. Won't be cheap tho, but I WILL OWN a 12'er before long.
Have a look at the parent site for Godin here:
http://www.godinguitars.com/
#3
Quote by LeftyDave
You may(or may not) have any better luck getting the lefty 12 string from Simon & Patrick than you are with Seagull. They're the same company you see. Each is a child company of Godin, based up in Canada. Personally, I'd wait for the Seagull, as it'll be a bit higher quality than the S&P.
I'm in the same boat as you, in that it's very difficult to find quality 12 string acoustics for lefty's. Thus the reason I don't own one yet. So, I'm saving, and saving, and saving, and when I get enough, I'm ordering one just for me. Won't be cheap tho, but I WILL OWN a 12'er before long.
Have a look at the parent site for Godin here:
http://www.godinguitars.com/


I'd vote for the S&P because I'm not a huge fan of the Seagull headstock and I have yet to play a bad S&P 12 string.
"There but for fortune go you or I"- Phil Ochs
#4
^ haha. The seagull headstock has a functional purpose. It pulls the strings at a straighter angle in order to reduce string binding, making tuning and staying in tune easier and more effective.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#6
Of course the electronics will interfere with the unplugged sound. Anything that can get in the way of soundwaves, absorb them and dampen them down will effect what you hear. Is it a discernable difference? That is THE question. Some will argue that they can tell the diff. while others swear it makes no noticible diff. to the sound. You'll have to be the judge of that yourself. Recommendation: if you plan on using the electronics for either recording or live gigs, then get an A/E. If you have no real intention of amping up, then get a standard. You always have the option of adding a pup and preamp later if you feel you need it.
#7
Quote by LeftyDave
Of course the electronics will interfere with the unplugged sound. Anything that can get in the way of soundwaves, absorb them and dampen them down will effect what you hear. Is it a discernable difference? That is THE question. Some will argue that they can tell the diff. while others swear it makes no noticible diff. to the sound. You'll have to be the judge of that yourself. Recommendation: if you plan on using the electronics for either recording or live gigs, then get an A/E. If you have no real intention of amping up, then get a standard. You always have the option of adding a pup and preamp later if you feel you need it.


Exactly. Does it change the sound? Definitely. Will you notice it? Probably not. And to be honest, when people say they can "notice" the sound difference, it might just be their preconception.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#8
Now then, having said all that, I have been leaning toward a Fishman Active Matrix II under saddle transducer. The reason is simple. The actual pickup fits under the saddle piece, and the preamp portion get's installed into the lower bout strap button hole, which only needs to be enlarged a bit to fit. The only other component is the battery holder which can be placed anywhere near the soundhole and is held in place via double faced sticky tape. This is perhaps the least obtrusive of the amplification setups for acoustics, yet yields great sound thanks to the transducers ability to detect the actual strings vibrations themselves, rather than relying on a mic or a standard coil type pickup. Plus the fact that it's in the perfect place to grab these vibrations, right under the saddle where it contacts the bridge. This after all is where an acoustics tone, sustain, volume, clarity, well, basically everything, comes from. And, all of this can be performed as an add-on.
The most basic of course is to simply mic it, which means no alteration to the guitar whatsoever.
The purpose of this post? Options. There are many aftermarket setups to choose from. I just listed the one I want to install.
#9
Quote by captivate
^ haha. The seagull headstock has a functional purpose. It pulls the strings at a straighter angle in order to reduce string binding, making tuning and staying in tune easier and more effective.


I know what it's for, but that doesn't make it any more aestheically pleasing.
"There but for fortune go you or I"- Phil Ochs
#10
I know it doesn't, but aesthetics should be your last priority. It's an instrument, not a piece of art(well... it sort of is). But besides, you won't be looking at your guitar while you play it anyway
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#11
Quote by captivate
I know it doesn't, but aesthetics should be your last priority. It's an instrument, not a piece of art(well... it sort of is). But besides, you won't be looking at your guitar while you play it anyway


Only if it was the greatest sound and playing guitar in the world, would I not be constantly bothered, in the back of my mind, by the headstock.

The heart of the matter is you should play them both and buy the best one.
"There but for fortune go you or I"- Phil Ochs
#12
Hmm, now I know this may sound rather silly...

..but for a guitar that isn't a cutaway or an electric acoustic, can you not make it a lefty by simply restringing it the other way? And having the bridge flipped. Yeah I see that the pickguard will be on the other side but I'm sure you can take it to a shop and have it removed and a have a lefty one put on.

Does this make any sense or do I sound like a complete moron here?

(edit: now that i think about it, it's probably more trouble than it's worth...but i suppose it could still be an option)
Last edited by Guns N Russians at Oct 20, 2008,
#13
Quote by Guns N Russians
Hmm, now I know this may sound rather silly...

..but for a guitar that isn't a cutaway or an electric acoustic, can you not make it a lefty by simply restringing it the other way? And having the bridge flipped. Yeah I see that the pickguard will be on the other side but I'm sure you can take it to a shop and have it removed and a have a lefty one put on.

Does this make any sense or do I sound like a complete moron here?

(edit: now that i think about it, it's probably more trouble than it's worth...but i suppose it could still be an option)


It's definitely possible. I'm not sure that the guitar is braced to be that way, so you MIGHT face problems with that. Especially on a 12 string guitar(if you do come across a problem like that to begin with).
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.