#1
I know very little of music theory involving time signatures and notation, and ive been wondering, what exactly is a gallop?

I know how to play them, but what are they? Are they triplets or what?

Sorry if i sound like an idiot, i just dont like being ignorant of what i'm playing.

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#2
A gallop is an 8th note followed by two 16th notes. It's very common in metal. It gives a distinctive "Dun-duh-duh dun-duh-duh dun" sound. Listen to some Iron Maiden, you'll hear it.

There's also the reverse gallop, two 16ths followed by an 8th. Raining Blood by Slayer has a very famous reverse gallop riff.
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#3
like gallops in the trooper by iron maiden?
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#4
No they are not triplets.. Its just 3 notes followed by a rest, all of the same duration

Just play four notes evenly over and over. Now take out the last note and you have your gallop.

This is the best i could come up with without using any music theory..
Last edited by xyber56 at Oct 18, 2008,
#5
Alright, so what signature would they be being played in?

Like would it be noted down as 4/4 or something in ?/8 or ?/16?

And i know how to play them, and i know what they sound like, im just asking what the theory is behind them.

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#6
Quote by MakeItWitChu
Alright, so what signature would they be being played in?

Like would it be noted down as 4/4 or something in ?/8 or ?/16?

And i know how to play them, and i know what they sound like, im just asking what the theory is behind them.

Whatever key signature you want. Depending on how long you want to hold the notes.
#7
Quote by StratoTele
Whatever key signature you want. Depending on how long you want to hold the notes.

SAy it was a reverse gallop, 2 16th notes and one 8th note. How would that be written down? What signature?

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#8
In 4/4 it'd look like

_____
|__| __|
|__| |
| | |
o o o

Those 'o's being filled in, of course.

That is one beat.

Edit: That looks messy.
Last edited by StratoTele at Oct 18, 2008,
#9
Like would it be noted down as 4/4 or something in ?/8 or ?/16?


It's an eighth note followed by two sixteenth notes. You can use it in whatever time signature you want. Write it as an eighth note followed by two sixteenth notes.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
So is a gallop technically a triplet at all?

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#13
Quote by MakeItWitChu
So is a gallop technically a triplet at all?


No.
#14
Gallops aren't triplets, and I believe they've been adequately explained,

but I had to contribute this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qc98u-eGzlc

Fastest. Gallops. Ever

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#15
Quote by xyber56
No they are not triplets.. Its just 3 notes followed by a rest, all of the same duration

Just play four notes evenly over and over. Now take out the last note and you have your gallop.

This is the best i could come up with without using any music theory..

I'm afraid you are wrong.

Gallops are one 8th note followed by two 16ths (or notes of equal fractional difference depending on the tempo). I'll try to explain using simple diagrams.

1 23

That is the standard note pattern for a gallop.

Now. The reason you hear them as 3 notes of the same duration is because they are played like this.

1 231 231 231 231 23


The "three notes of the same duration" that you think you're hearing are actually the two 16th notes followed by the 8th note of the next gallop.
#16
hmm, an interesting song to throw into this thread is Am I Evil (by Diamond Head....or more known by the Metallica version)

the riff is two 8th notes followed by a 8th note triplet

I guess that counts as some kind of extended gallop


edit: hmm, I just realised that the tab has got the time signature listed as a triplet feel...so its more like all triplets
because constantly changing between regular notes and triplets would be a it wierd....

|--0-----0--|--0--0--0--|



Quote by Go Square Go!
I'm afraid you are wrong.

Gallops are one 8th note followed by two 16ths (or notes of equal fractional difference depending on the tempo). I'll try to explain using simple diagrams.

1 23

That is the standard note pattern for a gallop.

Now. The reason you hear them as 3 notes of the same duration is because they are played like this.

1 231 231 231 231 23


The "three notes of the same duration" that you think you're hearing are actually the two 16th notes followed by the 8th note of the next gallop.


err, you both got it right

three notes of the same duration + a rest of the same duration = two notes of the same duration + one note twice as long
Last edited by seljer at Oct 19, 2008,
#17
Ok, so ive been thinkin' about it.

A gallop is 2/3rds of a triplet, so a gallop and an 8th note would make up a "triplet" technically?


also,
Quote by valennic
Gallops aren't triplets, and I believe they've been adequately explained,

but I had to contribute this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qc98u-eGzlc

Fastest. Gallops. Ever


Hell yeah to Meshuggah, i love that riff.


EDIT: How would that Bleed Riff be noted down? Because i noticed it sounds like a gallop followed by an 8th note? Or am i hearing wrong?

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Last edited by MakeItWitChu at Oct 19, 2008,
#18
A gallop is 2/3rds of a triplet, so a gallop and an 8th note would make up a "triplet" technically?


This has nothing to do with a triplet. A triplet is three notes in the space of two.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
Quote by MakeItWitChu
Ok, so ive been thinkin' about it.

A gallop is 2/3rds of a triplet, so a gallop and an 8th note would make up a "triplet" technically?


also,


Hell yeah to Meshuggah, i love that riff.


EDIT: How would that Bleed Riff be noted down? Because i noticed it sounds like a gallop followed by an 8th note? Or am i hearing wrong?


From what I've got, it's two 32nd notes followed by a 16th at 115 bpm.

You COULD notate it with 8th notes, the tempo would have to be kicked up a lot.

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#20
There's too much screwing around in this thread. I'm just going to clarify everything in question and put an end to this thread.

The Gallop has absolutely nothing to do with the Triplet, nothing whatsoever. Pound that idea into your head.

I'm going to assume you want an aggressive metal sound when I type this.

The Gallop is 8th 16th 16th. Assuming the tempo does not allow for all downpicking, the gallop should be played D D U. The Reverse Gallop is, not surprisingly, 16th 16th 8th. Assuming the tempo does not allow for all downpicking, the gallop should be played D U D. The Triplet is 3 even notes played in one beat. An entire triplet takes up the same amount of time as a Gallop or Reverse Gallop, but the notes are played with a different rhythm; they're evenly spaced, as I said before. Triplets are usually played in groups; it would be unusual for there to be just one Triplet. Two consecutive Triplets should be played D U D U D U. Many people say to play it D U D D U D so you're using the same picking pattern for each group. My opinion is that if you can play the two downstrokes in a row, man-up and downpick the whole thing you whiny bitch. jk (Holy fuck, I just used Middle School internet slang!)
#21
Quote by valennic
From what I've got, it's two 32nd notes followed by a 16th at 115 bpm.

You COULD notate it with 8th notes, the tempo would have to be kicked up a lot.

Really?

Hmmm... well from what ive listened to, it sounds like its a gallop, followed by an 8th note or something... then repeats.. alot.


WOULD ANYONE KNOW?

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#22
Quote by MakeItWitChu
Really?

Hmmm... well from what ive listened to, it sounds like its a gallop, followed by an 8th note or something... then repeats.. alot.


WOULD ANYONE KNOW?



hmm, theres a couple of guitar pro tabs....

heres a dude playing it
http://www.vimeo.com/1313817

and here it is opened in audacity



which I think would come out as

didn't really bother to think what time signature but you can see the subdivisions....

though I think I managed to get the drum part there instead of the guitar...
Last edited by seljer at Oct 21, 2008,