#1
ok so i went on the lessons up on the stickies. but these lesson however i found un helpful as i dont really know what major scale or minor scale is and i dont understand what intervals and 4/4's can anybody explain this please.

ps i know alot of chords and ive been playing for 3 and half years just learning loads of songs, solos and working on my timing. but ive been asked to join a band so this is to improve my knowledge basically. i know what makes a chord a certain key i know how to tune my guitar by ear and all that stuff but this is just damn hard shiz and i dont think any of the lessons have summed it up

thanx in advance

metallica rule!
#2
An interval is the distance between two notes e.g a perfect 5th is five notes above your first note in the given key.

4/4 is a time signiture, meaning four crotchets (one beat notes) in every bar.

TM
#3
Quote by tim_mop
An interval is the distance between two notes e.g a perfect 5th is five notes above your first note in the given key.

4/4 is a time signiture, meaning four crotchets (one beat notes) in every bar.

TM



ah i see but for the intervals what does it mean, i mean it means nothing to me for all i know it could be a damn maths equation lol.

and btw i no i sound noobish lol!
#5
learn the major and minor scales, intervals are the number of notes between any two given notes in a scales.

4/4 is a time signature, uhm basically if you tap your foot at a steady speed and count to 4 repeatedly in time with that, thats 4/4
#6
Quote by stephen_rettie
learn the major and minor scales, intervals are the number of notes between any two given notes in a scales.

4/4 is a time signature, uhm basically if you tap your foot at a steady speed and count to 4 repeatedly in time with that, thats 4/4



but how do i learn the major and minor scales its not liek a song is it?
#7
if you know a lot of songs and you can solo you probably do know all that stuff just not whats what because you dont know the names. all the names for scales and beats and what not are just for communication with other musicians which is important when working with a band during practice or creative time but not necessarily a hinderance to your playing as a musician.
#8
Quote by gooooog
but how do i learn the major and minor scales its not liek a song is it?


scales are notes that sound nice when played with a key/chord progression.

you start by learning the basic shapes of scales and then use these in improvising.
#9
Quote by gooooog
but how do i learn the major and minor scales its not liek a song is it?

Read the Crusade articles like I told you in your thread in G&BB

There's a link somewhere in Freepwer's sig...
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#10
Major scales are basically this when you start on a note, and go up two whole steps, then on half step, two whole steps, and then one half step.

so A B C# D E F# G# A is the A major scale.

So when they say a major chord is the 1st 3rd and 5th notes, it means A C# and E are in a major chord.

And a 5th above A is E, 7th is G#, and so on.

This applies to all scales.
#11
Minor scales have a flat 3rd, 6th, and 7th, so the steps are A whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, half step,whole step, whole step.

so, A B C D E F G A is the A minor scale.
#12
Oh yeah, and most songs use harmonic minor scales, where they raise the 7th note up a half step, so G# in the A minor scale
#13
Look up the circle of 5ths. Confusing but its good to refer too.

Basically you start from the C major scale, which is no sharps or flats
CDEFGABC

Count 5 from C, which is G, the next scale is G major, which has one sharp. This one is f#.
GABCDEF#G

Count 5 from G which is D, so the next scale is D major, which has 2 sharps, the first sharp is the F#, and to work out the next sharp count 5 from the first sharp, F#-G-A-B-C, so the next sharp is C#, so the scale of D major is
DEF#GABC#D

Using the same way we folllow that all the way around to 6 sharps

A major - ABC#DEF#G#A (3 Sharps)

E major - EF#G#ABC#D#E (4 Sharps)

B major -BC#D#EF#G#A#B (5 sharps)

F# major (because the 5th from B major is F, and F is sharpened in this key.) - F#G#BC#D#E#F# or Gb major DbEbFGbAbBbCbDb

To do the flats start from F major (1 flat) - FGABbCDEF

then do the same thing but with 4 instead of 5s, for example, the next scale is Bb major, and the enxt flat in the scale is Eb, because Eb is 4 notes from Bb which was the first flat in the scale - BbCDEbGAB

And so on

Minor scales are relative of the major scales, to get the relative minor scale of a major scale, just count 3 back from the starting note.

So for C major, the relative is A minor, which has the same key signature, no sharps of flats, but for the harmonic minor scale, the 7th note of the scale is raised (starting from A), so when writing in A minor, the G must be raised so the A minor scale is
ABCDEFG#A

This probably made very little sense but i tried.



HAve a look at this
Last edited by beckyjc at Oct 19, 2008,
#14
Quote by Limabean231
Minor scales have a flat 3rd, 6th, and 7th, so the steps are A whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, half step,whole step, whole step.

so, A B C D E F G A is the A minor scale.



kk ty i will try and work out what uve just said but thank you all
#15
Quote by beckyjc
Look up the circle of 5ths. Confusing but its good to refer too.

Basically you start from the C major scale, which is no sharps or flats
CDEFGABC

Count 5 from C, which is G, the next scale is G major, which has one sharp. This one is f#.
GABCDEF#G

Count 5 from G which is D, so the next scale is D major, which has 2 sharps, the first sharp is the F#, and to work out the next sharp count 5 from the first sharp, F#-G-A-B-C, so the next sharp is C#, so the scale of D major is
DEF#GABC#D

Using the same way we folllow that all the way around to 6 sharps

A major - ABC#DEF#G#A (3 Sharps)

E major - EF#G#ABC#D#E (4 Sharps)

B major -BC#D#EF#G#A#B (5 sharps)

F# major (because the 5th from B major is F, and F is sharpened in this key.) - F#G#BC#D#E#F# or Gb major DbEbFGbAbBbCbDb

Then from Gb major...

Db major - DbEbFGbAbBbCDb

Ab major - AbBbCDbEbFG

and so on till you get to F major - FGABbCDEF

Minor scales are relative of the major scales, to get the relative minor scale of a major scale, just count 3 back from the starting note.

So for C major, the relative is A minor, which has the same key signature, no sharps of flats, but for the harmonic minor scale, the 7th note of the scale is raised (starting from A), so when writing in A minor, the G must be raised so the A minor scale is
ABCDEFG#A

This probably made very little sense but i tried.

Eb major -



so ya know the list of the notes ya gave me in each one of these do i play them on one string or?...
#16
It doesn't matter, it's got nothing to do with where you play them...they're just notes, theory is about music in general and isn't instrument-specific.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#17
Quote by steven seagull
It doesn't matter, it's got nothing to do with where you play them...they're just notes, theory is about music in general and isn't instrument-specific.



oh now im starting to understand cheers guys

where will i find a bank of this shizzle?
#18
Still in the Crusade articles, in the Columns section...
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#19
Quote by steven seagull
Still in the Crusade articles, in the Columns section...



can ya not give us a link cos i really dont know what it means lol.