#1
so i ususally practice with a metronome to work on speed for an hour a day... two nights ago my metronome broke and i just did excersizes without a metronome at a comfortable speed for me for an hour and the next day i felt like my playing had drastically improved.. should i still do the metronome... or stick to doing excersizes without it... or half and half?
#3
Quote by guitarmageddon0
so i ususally practice with a metronome to work on speed for an hour a day... two nights ago my metronome broke and i just did excersizes without a metronome at a comfortable speed for me for an hour and the next day i felt like my playing had drastically improved.. should i still do the metronome... or stick to doing excersizes without it... or half and half?



Without the metronome you're not as locked in so you can let yourself go. This freedom that you probably haven't had in a while, feels good and is what likely gave you the idea that you had drastically improved.

I would recommend spending time both with and without the metronome.


Also, you should know that using a metronome as a way to gauge your speed is just one thing that you can use it for.

Try this: rather than only using the metronome to gauge your speed, use it to work on your timing and feel as well. Focus on how well you can play in time. you can work on fundamental things such as different note values (like 8ths, 16ths....), or you can work on some actual music ( like a song or something) to see how well you can play in time.
shred is gaudy music
#4
Quote by GuitarMunky
Try this: rather than only using the metronome to gauge your speed, use it to work on your timing and feel as well. Focus on how well you can play in time. you can work on fundamental things such as different note values (like 8ths, 16ths....), or you can work on some actual music ( like a song or something) to see how well you can play in time.

This. It's very hard for me to lock in playing 16th notes at 10BPM.
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#5
Quote by SilverDark
This. It's very hard for me to lock in playing 16th notes at 10BPM.


Yeah, playing slow, in time and with good feel can actually be quite challenging.
shred is gaudy music
#6
Playing slow is the hardest in my opinion considering the focus on timing and such.
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#7
I spend 95% of my time with the metronome going.

In any real music playing situation, you'll either be playing with a drummer, drum machine, or click track. So having a strong sense of rhythm is super important - not just staying locked on, but awareness of what is going on underneath with the rhythm. In fact, to me how tight a guitarist is rhythmically (during rhythm or lead) is probably the #1 factor in determining whether he's any good or not.
#8
i say alternate, especially when you're playing with a band.

what i like about jamming our songs with a metronome is that after we've been doing it for a while, it becomes instinctive for everyone in the band to start and maintain the songs at the EXACT right tempo even when we aren't using the metronome, like when we're on stage. it makes a big difference, because the audience subconsciously notices when the beat fluctuates due to sloppy timing, and it prevents people from dancing and getting into the show.
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
Without the metronome you're not as locked in so you can let yourself go. This freedom that you probably haven't had in a while, feels good and is what likely gave you the idea that you had drastically improved.

I would recommend spending time both with and without the metronome.


Also, you should know that using a metronome as a way to gauge your speed is just one thing that you can use it for.

Try this: rather than only using the metronome to gauge your speed, use it to work on your timing and feel as well. Focus on how well you can play in time. you can work on fundamental things such as different note values (like 8ths, 16ths....), or you can work on some actual music ( like a song or something) to see how well you can play in time.


all this.

i alternate with using metronome and not using metronome myself. using the metronome, i completely focus on the rhythmic part of playing. without it, i focus totally on my technique, and it's completely different. playing in both situations is necessary if you want to improve either.
don't forget to tap your foot when playing with a metronome.
#11
It may have seemed you had improved due to the fact that you couldn't tell when you would get slightly out of time. As a result you may have thought you were playing better because your mistakes weren't as obvious without the metronome.

Maybe- I don't know.
Si
#12
Quote by RCalisto
don't forget to tap your foot when playing with a metronome.

You should tap your foot regardless. It should quite literally become a "living metronome".
#13
^ i choose not to when strictly practicing technique. yeah, i probably should do that, but i think it pays off more, practicing them separately.
i've been tapping my foot at school though, in every class, while practicing my finger independence in the table lmao
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#14
^ Haha. That made me smile. I got the feel of septuplets down by sitting in my car during rush hour going "DA-da-da-da-da-da-da-DA" over and over. Now, do you wonder why non-musicians think that we are insane?