#1
I have been playing for about 9 months and I am overwhelmed with all this theory.

I just want to know what is really necessary and will be useful.

I haven't learned all the notes on the fretboard but I know how to find them. I know what steps are, the major scale, all the minor scales(natural, harmonic melodic). I think I know the concept of the Circle of 5ths, and I know about triads and how to build chords.

If somebody could point me in the right direction that would be great.
#3
the thing i find particularity useful is that when im learning a song i can pick apart the song and understand the music much better than i would without it
#4
Basically, learn as much theory as you can. There are a few things that you'll learn that gets you to the next level in your playing ability. That one is absolutely crucial.
#5
you will do better based on how much theory you know. the more you know the more you can do with music. and you can look really smart when you know theory.
#6
Quote by RounderIII
I have been playing for about 9 months and I am overwhelmed with all this theory.

I just want to know what is really necessary and will be useful.

I haven't learned all the notes on the fretboard but I know how to find them. I know what steps are, the major scale, all the minor scales(natural, harmonic melodic). I think I know the concept of the Circle of 5ths, and I know about triads and how to build chords.

If somebody could point me in the right direction that would be great.



there is no particular amount that is "necessary". Learn as much as you want/have time to. Learn at a pace that makes sense to you. Most importantly... enjoy the process of learning it.
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#7
if your gonna compose your own music you should learn it if you jsut wanna jam then probably none
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#8
Beyond knowing things on paper, train your ear. Knowing how to construct the chords of a major scale is infinitely more useful when you can use it to pick out chord progressions. What you've got looks solid so far, ahead of plenty of people.
#9
Quote by Paquijón
The necessary amount of theory that you need to know is the amount that you need to know to do the things that you want with music.

Spot on - and I'd add that you only need enough theory to help you understand what you're technically able to do. The most important, basic things to get under your belt are the notes on the fretboard, intervals, the basics of the major scale and chord construction - those 4 things alone actually cover a massive amount of ground.
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#10
well, guess what, if you want to be an advanced virtuoso musician that someone respects, and not be viewed as a poser, then you have to learn theory.
#11
Start at the first theory lesson in my sig. Then if you're ready and confident with the first, move on. These are designed particularly for those who are genuinely new to theory as regards the guitar.
#12
I'd say for playing for 9 months your pretty far ahead if you know all that. Test yourself, do you really know those aspects of theory inside out or do you just know what they are. Don't get too caught up in the theory side of it, take your time with a new concept and try it out on your guitar. That's all the advice I can give is to really try and understand something before you move on, it's not a race you don't 'have' to know all the theory there is to know.
#13
I think after 9 months of playing guitar, the theory you need should involve Chord Formulation.

For example, the theory of what makes a chord major/minor/dominant.

Im saying this because this is important with reading charts of songs you want to learn.

It also gives you a basic platform to launch into learning intervals and scales.
#14
I'd say to become a good guitarist you've gotta at least have a good ear. A la Mikael Akerfeldt. Awesome composer, knows no theory, but has a good ear. But if you flip it over, the stuff he'd be able to do with theory would probably be a whole lot more than what he can without it. You can still play guitar with none, but having theory can only help not hinder you.
#15
Keep on going with the theory. Consider yourself lucky. As a guitarist, if you want to change keys, you move your hand. With other instruments like the trumpet or sax, you need to think each and every note out.
#16
Quite personally, I love theory. It for one makes me feel smart when my friends are talking about music, and for two I also need it as Im gonna major in music in college.

Learn theory, its quite useful.
#17
Quote by philbertfwog
I'd say to become a good guitarist you've gotta at least have a good ear. A la Mikael Akerfeldt. Awesome composer, knows no theory, but has a good ear. But if you flip it over, the stuff he'd be able to do with theory would probably be a whole lot more than what he can without it. You can still play guitar with none, but having theory can only help not hinder you.


I completely agree with this view, its pissing off when people get so caught up with theory is as if being a good guitarist depended on it, but at the same time not knowing even the basics of theory will hinder your full creative ability, what you know now is good, you know about as much as I know and I have been playing for 1 and a half years, take a break from theory and focus on exploring what you have already learned.....
#18
You don't need to learn all theory.

Just the theory needed for ur music. If you only play metal guitar then you don't need to learn Jazz comping. If you however like jazz and want to incorporate Jazz licks in emtal then you could.


Best is to learn the basic theory in freepower's sig, and the crusade articles located on this site, cause those are helpful for any style of music.

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#19
Make sure you go step by step. Don't move onto the next thing until you understand the previous one completely. You sound like you have a bit of difficulty with the circle of fifths. Maybe you should move back and stick with it for a while before you move on. Patience is a virtue.


Enjoy!
#21
I would say learn as much theory to accomplish the kind of music you want, get some ear training down, and maybe break down songs that you like and notice how they put it all together.

Don't forget to do it at a pace that is comfortable to you...You don't want to jump into something harder than what you are already working on.
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