#1
All the videos on youtube that I watched about pinch harmonics said to grip down on the pick so that when you pick the note, your thumb will make the harmonic flow instead of having to drop your thumb down. I can get pinch harmonics 5/10 times or so, but how do I go from playing a palm muted riff to a pinch harmonic? An example would be Psychosocial's intro by Slipknot. that DUN DUN DUNNA NUH DERRR riff.

I'm guessing take it slow and practice?
#2
no, i mean you can drop the thumb down on the palm mute too, its not hard really, in fact it usually makes the flow go better for me
#3
wat i do is as im playing the palm muted part I slowly move my thumb over the pick and then play then harmonic
#4
Well it seems to me that I get alot less attack on my strings when I grip down, maybe I'm putting my thumb too far down?

Also when I reposition my thumb, my index finger repositions itself too, is that ok?


If I can't get my thumb down without pushing the pick against a surface or something, am I doing it like completely wrong?
Last edited by CrzyGuitarist93 at Oct 19, 2008,
#5
I still have trouble with this as well. I've dropped a lot of picks trying to get my thumb down in a relatively quick manner. It's easier with heavier picks also.
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#6
Ok i will help to make this sweet and easy ill will post a video. Ill use physcosocial as the example this is actually one of the harder things to do when i was learning them my teacher always told me to drop my thumb were as other people told me to actualy use my index finger. LOL 10 years later I still use my thumb so ill post a video intill then if you guys need help pm me and ill do my best because this is a hard thing to explain id have to show it!
#7
Ive developed my own way. I use my index finger, barely dropped over the pick. I can do pinch harmonics 90% of the time . (Just something that I like doing)
#8
Quote by youngncy
Ok i will help to make this sweet and easy ill will post a video. Ill use physcosocial as the example this is actually one of the harder things to do when i was learning them my teacher always told me to drop my thumb were as other people told me to actualy use my index finger. LOL 10 years later I still use my thumb so ill post a video intill then if you guys need help pm me and ill do my best because this is a hard thing to explain id have to show it!


Bro that would be awesome. Yeah that Psychosocial riff IMO is really awesome, but it sounds kinda hard.

Thanks for all the advice
#9
I don't know if I do PHs in an unusual way, but I never actually change my grip on the pick. Honestly, I have no idea how it would be possible to change your grip and then get it back into position to pick normally. (If you can do that, more power to you).

Basically, I just "dig in" with the pick to get PHs. I guess instead of trying to hit the string with my pick, I try to hit it with the edge of my thumb. When I go for a PH, I get it 100% of the time.

I use Dunlop Tortex Jazz picks (those tiny little ones with the pointy tip). I guess my natural picking grip has me "choking up" on the pick all of the time. I just do this naturally and it works great for all sorts of picking.

Try out a Jazz pick.
#10
Quote by tapitin
I don't know if I do PHs in an unusual way, but I never actually change my grip on the pick. Honestly, I have no idea how it would be possible to change your grip and then get it back into position to pick normally. (If you can do that, more power to you).

Basically, I just "dig in" with the pick to get PHs. I guess instead of trying to hit the string with my pick, I try to hit it with the edge of my thumb. When I go for a PH, I get it 100% of the time.

I use Dunlop Tortex Jazz picks (those tiny little ones with the pointy tip). I guess my natural picking grip has me "choking up" on the pick all of the time. I just do this naturally and it works great for all sorts of picking.

Try out a Jazz pick.

This man speaks the truth, pick's make a big difference.
#12
For the longest time, I had been using the regular Dunlop Tortex 1.14mm (purple). Then about 5 years ago, I was in a guitar shop, needed to get some more picks, and noticed the Dunlop Tortex Jazz picks- I had never seen anything like them before, and thought they looked kind of silly, but I decided to give them a shot (I also got the purple 1.14mm).

I haven't looked back. In fact, I am now incredibly clumsy with a "standard" pick. I love having a shart point instead of a rounded tip. And for me, it's just so much easier to grip something that's very small (even though I have giant hands).

I believe 1.14mm is the biggest of the Dunlop Tortex Jazz- I'm thinking of getting a slightly higher guage- I believe the Dunlop Jazz IIIs are similar and slightly thicker.

EDIT: Looking on MusiciansFriend, it doesn't look like they're described in millimeters. Looks like there are 3 sizes- L, M, H. And, 2 varieties in each size: "1" is a rounded tip, "3" is the sharp point. I use the H3.
Last edited by tapitin at Oct 20, 2008,
#13
I use the jazz picks too I perfer them and the intro riff to Physcosocial isnt that hard

Intro - guitar 1
B |-----------------------------------------------------|
F#|-----------------------------------------------------|
D |-----------------------------------------------------|
A |-------------6*---------------------------6*---------|
E |-----------------------------------------------------|
A |-0--0--0-0-0-----0--3h5-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-----0--3h5-|
pm  .  .  . . .     .      . . . . . . . . .     .

B |---------------------------------------------------------|
F#|---------------------------------------------------------|
D |---------------------------------------------------------| X2
A |----------6*---------------------------------------------|
E |---------------------------------------------------------|
A |-0--0-0-0-----0--3h5-0-0-5-5-5-5-6-6-6-6-8-8-8-8-7-7-7-7-|
pm  .  . . .     .      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
F#|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
D |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
A |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
E |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
A |-5-5-5-5-6-6-6-6-8-8-8-8-7-7-7-7-5-5-5-5-6-6-6-6-8-8-8-8-7-7-7-7-|
pm  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B |--------------------------|
F#|--------------------------|
D |--------------------------|
A |--------------------------|
E |--------------------------|
A |-5555555566668888-6v--5-6-|

Intro - guitar 2
B |------------------------------------------------------|
F#|------------------------------------------------------|
D |------------------------------------------------------|
A |------------------------------------------------------|
E |-0----------------------------------------------------|
A |-0--------------------------------------------0--3h5--|
pm  .                                            .

B |---------------------------------------------------------|
F#|---------------------------------------------------------|
D |---------------------------------------------------------| X2
A |----------6*---------------------------------------------|
E |-------------------------6-6-6-6-7-7-7-7-9-9-9-9-8-8-8-8-|
A |-0--0-0-0-----0--3h5-0-0---------------------------------|
pm  .  . . .     .      . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
F#|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
D |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
A |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
E |-6-6-6-6-7-7-7-7-9-9-9-9-8-8-8-8-6-6-6-6-7-7-7-7-9-9-9-9-8-8-8-8-|
A |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
pm  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

B |--------------------------|
F#|--------------------------|
D |--------------------------|
A |--------------------------|
E |-66666666777799998888-12\-|
A |----------------------12\-|


LOL sorry about the long post though this would be helpful!
#15
Yeah, I use a Jazz III, have no problems changing. TS can you nail PHs without having to think about it? Because I found when I was able to do that I didn't have to think about changing pick styles either.
#16
I found that a really sturdy pick helps with learning PHs and getting better at them. When I started playing guitar, I was using Fender Mediums and was playing a lot of chords and basic scales just to learn theory and get used the the notes on the guitar. When I decided to start looking at playing lead parts, I came across PHs and had a lot of trouble with them. Then a friend of mine who works as a music shop gave me a couple different picks to try and I finally nailed my first PH with a Jazz II. It's really amazing how much changing picks can help you. I currently use Jazz IIIs like Freepower and many others on this site and now PHs are as easy as playing an A major scale.
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#17
I kind of choke up a bit on my pick when gripping it anyway, so if I fold the joints of my thumb and my pointer outward it's enough for me to get some good ones down. I wish I could illustrate what I mean. I go from putting pressure from the entire pads of my fingers to just the tips, and lifting the pack of the pads. If that makes any sense.
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#18
I'm definitely gonna get some of those jazz picks, they shouldn't be too much, and if they make the differences you guys say they do, they're definitely worth it.

Youngcy- Yeah the riff isn't too hard, but it still sounds pretty decent IMO

Thanks for the great advice guys!
#19
ok, guess you got sorted. The Jazz 3's are brilliant, especially for downstroke and upstroke pinches. You might find you get faster with em too.
#20
sorry to kind of hijack this thread but I am having trouble hearing when I am doing Pinch Harmonics and when I am not, it is getting quite annoying as it means that I can't really work out how to do them well through trial and error. I know what they sound like but I just don't seem to be getting that tone in what I believe to be a pinch harmonic.
#21
Quote by CrzyGuitarist93
I can get pinch harmonics 5/10 times or so

That fraction can be shortened to 1/2, brush up on your maths
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#22
Quote by Adrunselden
sorry to kind of hijack this thread but I am having trouble hearing when I am doing Pinch Harmonics and when I am not, it is getting quite annoying as it means that I can't really work out how to do them well through trial and error. I know what they sound like but I just don't seem to be getting that tone in what I believe to be a pinch harmonic.


The first thing you need to do is to find the nodes on the strings. You might be thinking that it is difficult, but its fairly easy.

First step is by looking at your string length, the middle of that would be 12th fret, right? Now from 12th fret to saddles divide it in two again and you get 24th fret. Divide again and again until you are inside your playing area. In that space you have all the nodes you'll ever need to learn the pinch technique (nodes being all those between 2nd and 3rd fret, 4th fret, 5th, 7th, 9th{which is the same as 4th} and 12th fret.

Next step would be to hold your pick correctly. All you'll ever need is the first 1mm of your picking point. So you lay your thumb above it and behind goes your index finger. Now when you pinch, the theory behind it is that the pick crosses the string followed by a light brush on the string from your thumb.

Now that you've learned how to play it easily, you can now incorporate it into your tracks. Remember it depends where you pick aswell. If you like the warmer sound you most likely will be picking over the neck pickup. Sometimes the neck coil doesn't pick up the pinch (unless you have a humbucker there) so you'll have to have your pickup selector on the bridge pickup.

The best place to pick would be over the middle pickup (if you have only two humbuckers then that would equate to the spot that's empty) so work out your nodes and away you go. After a while the nodes are imprinted to memory and you don't have to think about them again unless you are trying to harmonise pinches but thats a whole other lesson.

Enjoy, hope this helps, good luck
#24
Quote by CrzyGuitarist93
All the videos on youtube that I watched about pinch harmonics said to grip down on the pick so that when you pick the note, your thumb will make the harmonic flow instead of having to drop your thumb down. I can get pinch harmonics 5/10 times or so, but how do I go from playing a palm muted riff to a pinch harmonic? An example would be Psychosocial's intro by Slipknot. that DUN DUN DUNNA NUH DERRR riff.

I'm guessing take it slow and practice?


Instead of moving your thumb like most people do, or ultra-gripping the pick, try turning your hand a little bit to where the part of your thumb on the inside of the pick (closest to your wrist) is closer to the string, then use that part to create the harmonic, that way you don't have to alter the way you are holding the pick. The angles vary from person to person because of picking styles but it should still work despite the technique.
#25
maybe try changing the way you hold the pick over-all, if you choke down on the pick so that there's barely enough sticking out it's a lot better for your accuracy, etc. and it makes it a lot easier to do pinchs
#26
way i find it easier is to keep my heel of my hand on the strings while i palm mute, then pick it with part of my thumb as well, so the heel of my hand stops is from pinching while muting.
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#27
I had to go grab the guitar to see how I do it. I didn't remember repositioning the pick and thought maybe I did it subconciously. But no.

I guess i hold the pick pretty low anyway but when I create the PH I tilt the pick slightly so the bottom tip part of my thumb (the part that extends beyond the pick, not the part at the bottom of the pick) is the part of my thumb that creates the harmonic. If you saw what changed in my hand all you'd see is my thumb bending slightly (maybe a quarter inch if you held your thumb up and looked at it) changing the angle of attack. This allows the almost simultaneous touching of the pick and the thumb tip.

Quick summary: it's not the part of my thumb directly above the tip of the pick, I don't need to hold the pick lower, it's the part of my thumb that extends beyond nearer to the tip of my thumb and when I bend my thumb it touches.

Of course I hold my pick with very little flex in my knuckles to start with, and so if you're a pincher it may be difficult to get the added angle that way.

It's a very subtle position change, not a big movement.

This way I have complete control over when it sounds and when it doesn't.
#28
Quote by AlskiOverload
Ive developed my own way. I use my index finger, barely dropped over the pick. I can do pinch harmonics 90% of the time . (Just something that I like doing)

I use my index finger on upstroked p.h.s and thumb on downstrokes.
#29
Quote by Schnoodler
when I create the PH I tilt the pick slightly so the bottom tip part of my thumb (the part that extends beyond the pick, not the part at the bottom of the pick) is the part of my thumb that creates the harmonic. If you saw what changed in my hand all you'd see is my thumb bending slightly (maybe a quarter inch if you held your thumb up and looked at it) changing the angle of attack. This allows the almost simultaneous touching of the pick and the thumb tip.


That's what I do too. Don't need to change the grip - just change the angle.