#1
Well, title says it all. Im trying to write a bridge for a piece in E minor (chords used are E5, C5, G5, D5, and a full Em in the acoustic bit) The bridge will be a distorted electric guitar part, leading straight into solo.

Any help is appreciated. Its not a very fast song (120-130 BPM), and not heavy metal. More rock
#2
Usually I would say go to the relative major or minor....but in this case, since you're already using the I-IV-V of G major, I would say try using Am and Bm powerchords in the bridge, since you haven't used them yet in the song. And then play around with just changing the order of your other chords if that doesn't help--plenty of good songs just switch their chord orders and rhythms for bridges and it sounds really good.

That's really simple, but it should at least jump start a few ideas. Hope this helps.
'Cause I have done it before and I will do it some more....
#3
Quote by BHowell
Am and Bm powerchords
Um, what? It would typically be B major or B7 if you were playing full chords anyway.

Writing a bridge is very simple; you write something that is not the backing for the verse or chorus. My suggestion to you, with what I just said in mind, is to fool around and find something that sounds good; we will not write your songs for you nor would that be beneficial to your development as a songwriter.
#4
who is we? people come on here for help not to be told to get lost and help yourself...

If ur progression ends on Emin i would probably ascend into a Bmaj and slide up to F# minor, maybe minor, depending on the atmosphere it provides, same tempo different rhythm, thats a good rule of thumb for a bridge and a tasty little riff never hurts
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Um, what? It would typically be B major or B7 if you were playing full chords anyway.

Writing a bridge is very simple; you write something that is not the backing for the verse or chorus. My suggestion to you, with what I just said in mind, is to fool around and find something that sounds good; we will not write your songs for you nor would that be beneficial to your development as a songwriter.


Wouldn't B Major and B7 imply a harmonic minor? While a Bm would imply a natural minor?

Thus, you could pretty much choose which one you want to use.
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Um, what? It would typically be B major or B7 if you were playing full chords anyway.

Writing a bridge is very simple; you write something that is not the backing for the verse or chorus. My suggestion to you, with what I just said in mind, is to fool around and find something that sounds good; we will not write your songs for you nor would that be beneficial to your development as a songwriter.


B major or B7 aren't the dominant chords in E minor (unless its a harmonic minor scale), B minor is the correct one. (cheers michal23)

having said that, you don't have to follow the rules.

and i agree with this person, we're not here to write your songs, thats a skill for you to develop

listen to bridges of songs you like. sometimes it goes into the relative key. sometimes it modulates up a tone. sometimes the feel changes completely.

it's for you to decide, where do you want to go in the bridge?

do you want it to provide a temporary major lull before going back into the main minor progression?

do you want it provide a complete contrast to the rest of the song, by changing feel?

do you want to strip back the instruments, so it makes an even bigger effect when you do return to the main theme?

answer these questions, and you're on your way to writing a killer bridge.
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Last edited by les_paul_01 at Oct 21, 2008,
#7
Quote by les_paul_01
B major or B7 aren't the dominant chords in E minor (unless its a natural minor scale), B minor is the correct one.


Other way round - It's Bm if it's in a natural minor scale, B Major if it's in a harmonic minor scale.
#8
Bmajor would give a stronger and more pleasing resolution to Eminor... But you could use Bminor if you wanted.

If you were planing to use distortion I would stick with powerchords, as full chords sound terrible with distortion, too many notes, make it sound bad.....

Just use any powerchords from the key of Eminor... Mix em up and see what you get...
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Um, what? It would typically be B major or B7 if you were playing full chords anyway.

Writing a bridge is very simple; you write something that is not the backing for the verse or chorus. My suggestion to you, with what I just said in mind, is to fool around and find something that sounds good; we will not write your songs for you nor would that be beneficial to your development as a songwriter.

She is absolutely right, and this is exactly what I do too. Write your own dang songs.

The Beatles always wrote really bridges fyi
#10
Quote by les_paul_01
and i agree with this person, we're not here to write your songs, thats a skill for you to develop

listen to bridges of songs you like. sometimes it goes into the relative key. sometimes it modulates up a tone. sometimes the feel changes completely.

Thats what i was trying to find out with this thread, i didnt meen for you guys to actually write something out for me. I just didnt understand how bridges work (like going into relative keys and such)

Thank you for everyones help Ill try the B7 and such, because the lead melody in the chorus is using notes from E Harmonic Minor.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Um, what? It would typically be B major or B7 if you were playing full chords anyway.

Writing a bridge is very simple; you write something that is not the backing for the verse or chorus. My suggestion to you, with what I just said in mind, is to fool around and find something that sounds good; we will not write your songs for you nor would that be beneficial to your development as a songwriter.


I agree, when I fool around i come up with quite standard:

Em C G D verse
C D#dim Em D
C B7 leading into Em

Just an example....
#12
Quote by les_paul_01
B major or B7 aren't the dominant chords in E minor (unless its a harmonic minor scale), B minor is the correct one. (cheers michal23)
Heh, I love it when people are so arrogant with incorrect information.

The chords in the key of Em are Em7, F#m7b5, Gmaj7, Am7, B7, Cmaj7, and D7. The B7, or at least B major, is implied by the fact that you're in a minor key. It would be unusual to play Bm rather than B or B7. Really, the point of having the harmonic minor scale is largely to get that V7 chord rather than v7. V7-i is a much stronger resolution than v7-i; thus, a minor key is implied to have a major V chord even though that chord is not found in the natural minor scale of that key.

So a common progression would be Em D C B7 Em D C B7. Over the Em, D, and C chords, you would solo or sing the E Natural Minor scale, and then over B7, you would switch to the E Harmonic Minor scale because B7 comes from the E Harmonic Minor scale. You could also treat B7 as if it were coming from E Melodic Minor, which is possible, but that would be ususual. Of course, this is music and you can do what you want, but what I described is the conventional way to approach that chord progression; even though you can play what you want, however, the is no arguing that the major V chord is implied by a minor key.

Now you see why minor keys are more complex than major keys.
#13
Quote by Tubyboulin
Well, title says it all. Im trying to write a bridge for a piece in E minor (chords used are E5, C5, G5, D5, and a full Em in the acoustic bit) The bridge will be a distorted electric guitar part, leading straight into solo.

Any help is appreciated. Its not a very fast song (120-130 BPM), and not heavy metal. More rock


The best answer I can give you, and I mean this in all seriousness:

Write your own music.
shred is gaudy music
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Heh, I love it when people are so arrogant with incorrect information.

The chords in the key of Em are Em7, F#m7b5, Gmaj7, Am7, B7, Cmaj7, and D7. The B7, or at least B major, is implied by the fact that you're in a minor key. It would be unusual to play Bm rather than B or B7. Really, the point of having the harmonic minor scale is largely to get that V7 chord rather than v7. V7-i is a much stronger resolution than v7-i; thus, a minor key is implied to have a major V chord even though that chord is not found in the natural minor scale of that key.


I dont get this, you're saying the chords are: Em7, F#m7b5, Gmaj7, Am7, B7, Cmaj7, and D7, thats a natural minor scale (E, F#, G, A, B, C, D). However the chords in natural minor should be: Em, F#dim, G, Am, Bm, C and D....right?
Or am I missing something?
#16
B major or B7 aren't the dominant chords in E minor (unless its a harmonic minor scale), B minor is the correct one. (cheers michal23)


In Western tonal music, dominant chords are major. Harmonic minor is not a key, it is simply a by product of the use of a V chord. "Minor" implies a major chord built off of the dominant. A v chord is incredibly uncommon and will get you strange looks in many circles.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#17
Quote by BHowell
\Am and Bm powerchords in the bridge, \


Wat?

Since when do powerchords have a mediant???

And to be honest, basically anything can be the bridge. Just make sure it sounds different from the rest of the song.
#18
Quote by deHufter
I dont get this, you're saying the chords are: Em7, F#m7b5, Gmaj7, Am7, B7, Cmaj7, and D7, thats a natural minor scale (E, F#, G, A, B, C, D). However the chords in natural minor should be: Em, F#dim, G, Am, Bm, C and D....right?
Or am I missing something?

B7 has a D# as third. Bm has a D natural as its third. B7 is outside of the natural minor scale, but not outside of a minor key, because of the reasons that Sue posted above. Using B7 instead of Bm is the same reason you use D7 instead of Dm to resolve to Gmaj: It sounds more resolved that way.
#19
Quote by st.stephen
Using B7 instead of Bm is the same reason you use D7 instead of Dm to resolve to Gmaj: It sounds more resolved that way.
Well, no, not quite, as D7 is in the G major scale while Dm is not.
#20
Well, title says it all. Im trying to write a bridge for a piece in E minor (chords used are E5, C5, G5, D5, and a full Em in the acoustic bit) The bridge will be a distorted electric guitar part, leading straight into solo.

Any help is appreciated. Its not a very fast song (120-130 BPM), and not heavy metal. More rock
#21
eadgbe:022000
eadgbe:032000
eadgbe:042000
eadgbe:032000

then twice as long ,
eadgbe:x02200
eadgbe:x32030

enjoy !
#23
Quote by -=Led_Hed=-
who is we? people come on here for help not to be told to get lost and help yourself...

If ur progression ends on Emin i would probably ascend into a Bmaj and slide up to F# minor, maybe minor, depending on the atmosphere it provides, same tempo different rhythm, thats a good rule of thumb for a bridge and a tasty little riff never hurts


well said, the guy wants help, so let's help
------------------------------------------------------------------------

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#24
Quote by -=Led_Hed=-
who is we? people come on here for help not to be told to get lost and help yourself...


Tbh, that's usually pretty good advice.

Bridge - contrasting material. How it contrasts is up to you. Key change, different rhythms, a new riff... All you have to do is be able to compose something different that fits. (or doesn't fit. )