#1
There's a school talent show coming up in about 6 weeks. I could round up a drummer and a second guitarist but i probably wont find a bass player. That gives ~ 5 weeks practice which means about 4-5 practice sessions max.

So, 5 practice sessions and short a bass play (most likely)

Is this doable?
#2
the ting tings don't have a bass player

I say go for it.
Thomas hopes to not have offended anyone with this post. No responsibility whatsoever is taken for any spelling or grammar mistakes, should there be any.

last.fm
#3
Quote by Samothomas
the ting tings don't have a bass player

I say go for it.


forgot about this: We have to sign up by next week. Once were in,\ we cant get out. Once it to late or all the positions are filled we cant get in.

Is it a risk?
#5
I've been able to pull a whole set list from 2 practices. Depends on how well you can work together.
#6
Well I've played with a few drummers at school and sometimes me and my dad play (Him on drums, me playing guitar). I can keep time fairly well as long as the drumming isn't to complex.

I was thinking of doing 2 minutes to midnight - iron maiden and throwing in a heap of improv, keeping it totally instrumental.

Or maybe a few alternative/punk/pop-punk/ songs.

Does anyone know what key 2 minutes to midnight is in? =P
#7
I think you're probably better off putting the band together, ignoring this talent competition but entering the next one if you think you are ready by then.

It's a general rule of thumb with bands. Don't commit the band to any performances until you are quite sure the band is ready to do that performance to the best of it's ability.
Obviously, booking the gig before you've even completed the line up couldn't possibly go more against this rule.

So what's the reason for the rule?
Reputation. It's THE most imortant factor for a performing musician. Get a bad reputation and it's like having a giant rock tied around your ankle. It slows you down until you play that one truly great gig that makes your name for yourself. Problem is, if you already have a bad reputation from a truly horrendous performance, how are you gonna get the opportunity to play that truly great gig?

Take your time, carefully pick the people who you feel can bring the most to the band and who you feel can all get along the best. (you could have the best guitarist in the world, but if he's a dickhead, he's still a liability and will be a bigger problem than he's worth)
Once everything is sounding good, and it may take quite a bit just to get everyone jamming tightly, then concentrate on a set list.
Once you have a setlist rehearsed and tightened, then look towards playing a gig. You will make an instant impact and your reputation will flourish.
#8
Just do it - who cares if you suck. You get respect for having the balls to go for it and at least trying to overcome the obstacles. Just play something simple and play it well. It's much better than playing something hard and completely bombing.
Si
#9
Quote by SlackerBabbath
I think you're probably better off putting the band together, ignoring this talent competition but entering the next one if you think you are ready by then.

It's a general rule of thumb with bands. Don't commit the band to any performances until you are quite sure the band is ready to do that performance to the best of it's ability.
Obviously, booking the gig before you've even completed the line up couldn't possibly go more against this rule.

So what's the reason for the rule?
Reputation. It's THE most imortant factor for a performing musician. Get a bad reputation and it's like having a giant rock tied around your ankle. It slows you down until you play that one truly great gig that makes your name for yourself. Problem is, if you already have a bad reputation from a truly horrendous performance, how are you gonna get the opportunity to play that truly great gig?

Take your time, carefully pick the people who you feel can bring the most to the band and who you feel can all get along the best. (you could have the best guitarist in the world, but if he's a dickhead, he's still a liability and will be a bigger problem than he's worth)
Once everything is sounding good, and it may take quite a bit just to get everyone jamming tightly, then concentrate on a set list.
Once you have a setlist rehearsed and tightened, then look towards playing a gig. You will make an instant impact and your reputation will flourish.


OK thanks man. I couldn't decide wether to join up now or waiting and joining next years art show. Its not the same as a talent show. Its bigger but there's more acting and arts stuff but there's more schools, more people and you get more than 3 minutes stage time.

It also lets me get a good group of people together instead of another guitarist and a drummer.

Thanks for helping me make my decision.
#10
Quote by 20Tigers
Just do it - who cares if you suck. You get respect for having the balls to go for it and at least trying to overcome the obstacles. Just play something simple and play it well. It's much better than playing something hard and completely bombing.

NO


Not the case. If you suck, people will think you suck. There is a difference between being brave and being stupid.

Anyway, I think slackerblabbath covered most of the imprtant bits. Listen to him.
#11
Just get a drummer a bassist, no real need for two guitars as long as you stick to some bands that don't have too much rhythm guitar.
#12
How many songs do you have to play?

Generally, it takes about 2 or 3 hours to get a song written and nailed (from my experience, anyway) from scratch. If you're doing covers, people can work on their parts at home then come to practice with everything but synchronising between the members of the band done.

Also, make sure you come to practice with some ideas for songs if you're planning to write some, and tell the others to do likewise if possible.

Is this a one-off band or do you plan to keep it together after the gig?