#1
can anyone help me on how to harmonize this
d
A
F-14b16 14 12 11 12 9 11 12b14 12 11 9 7
C-
G
D

or just tell me the first few notes
#2
First step is to figure out what notes you are playing in the first place. To start you are playing G A G F etc....

A common technique is to use thirds above what you are playing (move each note up 4 frets)

You can also do 4ths, 5th or any interval that sounds good to you.
Last edited by standupnfall at Oct 21, 2008,
#8
Quote by standupnfall
First step is to figure out what notes you are playing in the first place. To start you are playing G A G F etc....

A common technique is to use thirds above what you are playing (move each note up 4 frets)

You can also do 4ths, 5th or any interval that sounds good to you.


Straight 3rds usually sounds ugly - the best thing to do is figure out what key you're in and use diatonic thirds ie thirds that match the chords of the key, which will mean moving between minor and major thirds.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Oct 22, 2008,
#9
Umm... on my case I just move the first note of the lick to be harmonized higher or lower (depending on which one would fit better) then I move around a definite scale to make the entire harmony of the lick.

Example:

the first lick of the chorus(?) of Canon Rock was composed of the tones: A, F#, G then back to A. I made a harmony by moving A one and a half tone down which is F#, after that, I tried to figure out a scale until I came up with A, B, C#, D#, F, F# and G. So to make the harmony for A, F#, G and A, I used F#, C#, D# and back to A#.

Hope that you can understand what I'm trying to say.
#10
Quote by steven seagull
Straight 3rds usually sounds ugly - the best thing to do is figure out what key you're in and use diatonic thirds ie thirds that match the chords of the key, which will mean moving between minor and major thirds.



Good point, didnt put much time into my reply sorry, also there is loads of info on this site that answers this. Ive seen multiple threads on this just the last week or so