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#1
Do you reallyneed to leant how to read music to become a good or a great guitarist? My friends think that I will have to learn how to read music to learn how to play better. My opinion is that I dont have to learn how to read. I need your guys' opinion
When I buy my wife, at first she cook good, her vagine worked well, she strong on plow, but three years later when she was fifteen, she receive hair on her chest, her voice become deep, "BORAT, BORAT", and her vagine hang like sleeve of wizard
#4
The simple answer: no.

The long answer: it depends on what your definition of a "great guitarist" is and what your goals are as a musician. If you just want to play in a rock band and jam out with your friends, it probably won't be necessary for you to learn how to read music. However, if you want to attend music school in the future, or aspire to become a studio musician, or want to play in a wedding band, or want to study classical guitar seriously, chances are you're going to need to learn how. There are plenty of great players out there who can't read a note of music and there are ton of them who can read very well; it all depends on your goals as a musician.

Also, an in-depth study of music theory (in general, or in a specific genre) will absolutely require the ability to read and understand sheet music.
#5
Jk from jermiriqui cant read music and look at him
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#6
Quote by ohhey9040
If you want to become a good guitarist, no. If you want to become a good musician, yes.


words from my metaphysical (is that the right word? probably not) mouth.
#7
Quote by doompers7491
Do you reallyneed to leant how to read music to become a good or a great guitarist? My friends think that I will have to learn how to read music to learn how to play better. My opinion is that I dont have to learn how to read. I need your guys' opinion


You certainly don't have to, but ultimately, you may want to. There are a lot of benefits to being a good reader. For one if you decide to learn music theory it's good to be fluent in the language that it's taught in. Reading music can also help to solidify your familiarity with the notes on the fretboard.

so there are a lot of benefits, but if you don't have the desire to work on that right now, it's okay. work on things that you're interested in, and maybe somewhere along the line you'll decide to look into reading music. It's possible for you to become a great guitarist either way.
shred is gaudy music
#8
No, but it definitely helps. I think you should at least know some theory to be a good guitarist but you don't necessarily have to be able to sight read to do that.
#9
No, you don't need to be a good player, but it will surely help you if you learn. Also, learning more stuff never killed anyone, so you're definitely better off by learning it, but it's all your choice.

A good example for what you may need to sight read, is that if you choose to play a piano, violin or whatever instrument part on your guitar, there probably won't have tablature, or if you can't get the audio track with the part, you gotta be able to read it. There are many more examples in which sight reading can help you, but this is the first that I thought of.
Hello, Mirror - so glad to see you my friend, it's been a while

Help me - I can't break out this prison all alone
Save me - I'm drowning and I'm hopeless on my own
Heal me - I can't restore my sanity alone
Last edited by XDream_TheaterX at Oct 21, 2008,
#10
Quote by HILIKUS!
No, but it definitely helps. I think you should at least know some theory to be a good guitarist but you don't necessarily have to be able to sight read to do that.


^ you can be a good guitarist with or without theory.

If you do choose to study theory though, being able to read music will be a huge benefit. personally, I would recommend getting your reading chops together before studying theory.
shred is gaudy music
#11
one way to look at it. ..if you do learn how to read and know theory you will never regret it..
#12
No you don't have to know how to read music to be a great guitarist however learning theory such as how scales and chord progressions are built will help greatly. When you are figuring out some of yur favorite songs its good to at least have that foundation to know where the song may be going. It makes things alot easier and I don't think it is as hard or boring as learning to read music.
#13
Do you really need to make a thread that's been done about every day?
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


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#14
Quote by ohhey9040
If you want to become a good guitarist, no. If you want to become a good musician, yes.

Musician: A person who plays or writes music.
http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&safe=off&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&hs=Cs5&q=define%3A+musician&btnG=Search&meta=

Guitarist: A musician that plays the guitar.
http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&safe=off&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&hs=Is5&q=define%3A+guitarist&btnG=Search&meta=

TS, you don't need to read music to be a good guitarist/musician. Once again, GuitarMunky is spot on.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#15
It certainly isn't necessary to know how to read music to be a good musician/guitarist, but it's highly advisable, really for all of the reasons GuitarMunky has said as well as the fact that you will have the option open of playing in settings that involve musicians other than guitarists. Being musically literate will also allow you to compose music for various other instruments and have others be able to play those parts. It all depends on what your goals are in music/with the guitar, really.
#16
I was expecting *some* stupidity in this thread, but there is none. No, I'm not disappointed.



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
Knowing how to read music won't make you a good musician. What it will do is allow you to communicate with other musicians, and gives you access to the wealth of musical knowledge that exists that isn't catered exclusively to the amateur guitar community in tab form. In short, it makes becoming a good musician easier.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Oct 21, 2008,
#18
Quote by Archeo Avis
Knowing how to read music won't make you a good musician. What it will do is allow you to communicate with other musicians, and gives you access to the wealth of musical knowledge that exists that isn't catered exclusively to the amateur guitar community through tab for. In short, it makes becoming a good musician easier.


In order to read music, you need basic knowledge of theory. So ultimately knowing how to read would (in some cases) increase your knowledge of theory, making it possible for you to become a better musician (again, in some cases)...
#19
To be a great guitarist, you should be able to do anything involving a guitar really. Same goes for any instrument.

And one skill for guitar is being able to read music. So if you ask me, a truly great guitarist can read music.
#20
I think it depends on what you want to do. It's really handy for showing other musicians what you are playing, especially if they play a different instrument.
#22
Quote by gonzaw
In order to read music, you need basic knowledge of theory. So ultimately knowing how to read would (in some cases) increase your knowledge of theory, making it possible for you to become a better musician (again, in some cases)...


I read music for years before I knew any theory. Don't confuse theory with basic music knowledge ( like knowing what a staff is....)


I agree with the rest of your point though.
shred is gaudy music
#23
Quote by Archeo Avis
Knowing how to read music won't make you a good musician. What it will do is allow you to communicate with other musicians, and gives you access to the wealth of musical knowledge that exists that isn't catered exclusively to the amateur guitar community in tab form. In short, it makes becoming a good musician easier.


^^^ infinity +1
#25
Quote by GuitarMunky
I read music for years before I knew any theory. Don't confuse theory with basic music knowledge ( like knowing what a staff is....)


I agree with the rest of your point though.


Isn't the knowledge of compass, notes, figures, cleffs, dynamics notation, etc part of music theory?
#26
Compass?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#27
Quote by gonzaw
Isn't the knowledge of compass, notes, figures, cleffs, dynamics notation, etc part of music theory?


Not really, they are just basic music terms. They are used in theory, but knowing them does not constitute knowledge of music theory.
shred is gaudy music
#28
Quote by axemanchris
Compass?

CT


in portuguese musical therms it means time signature. i guess in spanish it does as well!
#29
Quote by RCalisto
in portuguese musical therms it means time signature. i guess in spanish it does as well!


ok, I think it's meter in english.
#30
You can know the musical terminology but that doesn't mean you understand them. The word Aeolian/natural minor to me was just a name for a mode. It wasn't until I learned about intervals that the names of modes related to the sounds i can recall from memory. Sightreading/notation is great to know because you can communicate your ideas in a language all musicians know. Anytime and anywhere.
#31
TAB is like a language that a minority of people speak, which doesn't have any grammar - it still represents something but you need to hear it to understand it properly.

Notation is like a langauge spoken by most people, which has lots of pointers such as grammar, defining exactly how it should be said. The words can still be spoken in different ways but if they are all accurate they should all sound basicaly the same.

Really, it's impossible to sight read from tab so if you want to be a studio guitarist who is payed to go in, play and leave then you need to learn notation.
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Oct 22, 2008,
#32
Do you need to know how to read and write to be a great lyricist or singer? Of course not, but it'll sure help.
#34
Thanks for the explanation.

As far as whether reading is theory... we're really splitting semantic hairs here.

Maybe one way of looking at it is this...

I had a student a few years back who was autistic. He could read text at about a grade four level with decent fluency. A person could listen to him read and walk away with a clear message about what the text had to say. The problem was.... there was no 'connect' with the actual student as far as understanding *anything* that he read. Ask him what the text was about and he would have little concept of neither the main idea nor any of the details.

So, a philosophical question...
1. Was he reading? Put another way.... does reading involve being able to decode symbols into sound, or does it necessitate having an understanding of what you read?

This, to me, is a very rare case, but a useful one. My opinion is that the process of reading necessarily requires an understanding of the text.

So, if a person knows how to decode notes on a page, it is rare that he/she doesn't understand what they are playing, at least at some rudimentary level. This is where knowledge of reading meets theory. Although it is possible to have no knowledge of theory and still be able to read, I would suggest it is rare.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#35
i personally think that being able to sight read doesn't make you a musician. The ability to improvise does does.
Its like Art.. if i'm not mistaken professional artists don't trace drawings, they either make there own from scratch or change one to there own liking.

thats just my opinion
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
#36
It depends. If your interested in jamming with friends on weekends and have rather good ears, its not an issue. If you have perfect pitch, its probably not an issue. If your a normal person, who wants to pursue music as anything but just jamming with friends on weekends, you need to learn to read and you need to know the notes on your instrument.
#37
Quote by victoryaloy
i personally think that being able to sight read doesn't make you a musician. The ability to improvise does does.


Then is would follow that the only real music is improvisation. Admittedly, that's a bit of a slap in the face to just about every composer of the classical era, but who am I to argue?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#38
Ermmm.... so by that same logic, Segovia was not a musician? I mean, maybe he could have improvised, but I've never heard that.

One artist composed a piece. Another artist used his instructions to re-create the piece and bring it to life for others to enjoy. Is the art the instructions on the paper, or is the art the presentation of the work?

There is no real answer to that question, but it's worth pondering.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#39
The art is what both the instructions and the performance attempt to represent
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#40
I'd say go for it (learn to sight read that is). I've been playing guitar for the past 6-7 years, my technique is cool, but I feel that I can't express what I want exactly. So I can play what's "thrown" an me, but I can't really write something with a "hook" in it.

Try writing a "complicated" song on your own (for a first timer like I am, 3 guitar parts, a solo, violins, piano, bass and drums is about enough to consider it complicated). If you WANT to write music or know what exactly you are playing it will be really useful (alongside with ear and rhythmic training maybe). If you don't want to, then you don't really need to learn to do so.

It's music, and from my experience so far, ANYTHING you learn is a plus. It will never be a minus, no matter what.
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