#1
ok guys. i just wanna clear the air up a 'bit and ask you guys something.

1. specific keys have specific notes correct? so let's say A minor. If you were to make an A minor chord, the only notes you would have available would be the same notes in the scale correct?

2. how do you construct a scale? i know you take the root note and then do the whole/half step stuff... but can someone remind me what that is, and how to construct a pentatonic scale. i think it would be easier to remember how to construct rather than to remember the specific scales.

3. If a song in a specific key, the only chord changes available would be the notes in that specific key right? unless of course, they have a key change right?


Hopefully these questions are simple enough. Thanks in Advance.
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#2
Please read the theory link in my sig up to "modes." Then we can talk; I need you to have a solid understanding of the basics and nomenclature/notation before I can explain anything.
#3
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Please read the theory link in my sig up to "modes." Then we can talk; I need you to have a solid understanding of the basics and nomenclature/notation before I can explain anything.

May I ask what this is? Thx.

EDIT: Tis better to not offend when asking for knowledge. My bad.
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
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Last edited by SilverDark at Oct 21, 2008,
#4
1. specific keys have specific notes correct?
Yes
If you were to make an A minor chord, the only notes you would have available would be the same notes in the scale correct?
Yes, all the notes in an Am chord are in the Am scale.

2. how do you construct a scale? i know you take the root note and then do the whole/half step stuff... but can someone remind me what that is, and how to construct a pentatonic scale. i think it would be easier to remember how to construct rather than to remember the specific scales.
Lets stick to A minor and construct the A natural minor scale. The step-formula for the natural minor scale is W H W W H W W. (W = whole step = 2 frets, H = half step = 1 fret)

So, start at A and follow the steps.
A whole step from A is B
A half step from B is C
A whole step from C is D
A whole step from D is E
A half step from E is F
A whole step from F is G
A whole step from G is A

And so the A natural minor scale is A B C D E F G.

The step-formula for the major scale is W W H W W W H
Following the same procedure above:
A W B W C# H D W E W F# W G# H A
So the A major scale is A B C# D E F# G#

If a song in a specific key, the only chord changes available would be the notes in that specific key right?
No. A song in A minor will often have a G# note at certain points. While it is not a diatonic note, the song is still in A minor. However most of the time the chords you use will be diatonic (contain only notes in the key) unless you are aiming for atonality.
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#5
1-Ehhmm, if you are playing in key, you would be right, but some times out of key notes are used to make the piece sound in a different way than the one in which you are "restricted" to those notes (well "restricted", each of those notes has a function and a place in the key).

2-A scale is a succesion of notes ranging within an octave.
Ancient people decided to divide the octave in 2. They divided the octave in 2 succesions of notes separated by 1 tone (usually), they are called tetrachords.
They are a succesion of four notes, so you have CDEF as a tetrachord and GABC as another, if you join them CDEF-(a tone)-GABC you get the C major scale CDEFGAB.
The whole WWHWWWH thing is derived from how the Greeks (I think) used the tetrachords, like how they ordered intervals in each of them.

One rule about ancient tetrachords is that they span a perfect fourth (from C to F, from G to C, etc). Yet there are other tetrachords in Indian music, etc that don't, and they use other intervals, etc, etc.

What you do when creating scales is taking the "mother" scale (no alterations, or the diatonic one used long time ago) and transpose tetrachords, and then you make sure the tetrachords you created have the same intervals as the ones you had before.
Example:
You have the C major scale, CDEFGABC
It is divided in an inferior tetrachord (CDEF) and a superior one (GABC).
If you transpose them, like you make the superior one (GABC) an inferior one instead, you create another scale.
So if you have CDEF-GABC and make GABC the first one, and then complete the sequence of notes you get GABC-DEFG.
See that DEFG is not the same as CDEF, that is because if you transpose CDEF as a superior one, you would get GABC-CDEF, and as we saw in the rules, those two must be separated by 1 tone, but C-C is not a tone, so you create another tetrachord.
Now, in the last superior tetrachord you had GABC, and in the new one you have DEFG, you must check them so that they have the same intervals, and if they don't alter some notes of them so they do.
Now you check the WHHWW stuff.
GABC-WWH (I think this is called major tetrachord)
DEFG-WHW
they are not the same, you have to alter the F or G so that the W transforms into a H. and the E or F so that the H transforms into W.
The only way of doing this is sharpening the F, so you get GABC-DEF#G

Voila new scale...
Eventually you do this with every scale and this is how you contruct them...
#6
Quote by SilverDark
May I ask what this is?


Nomenclature=Technical terms: If I say that something is the fifth a chord, you should know what that means. A perfect is one technical term in music.

Notation=How we write things: I'll need to be able to write intervals for a scale and if you're not familiar with the notation I'm using, you won't know what I'm trying to explain.

Please read the article and then we can talk about this a ton over the next few days; I have some exams this week (why am I on the UG?) but then none until the second week of November, so I'll be on here quite a bit before I cram for my November exams.

Attention Students: Don't cram; it is something only I can pull off successfully.