#1
I've been playing for about 2 and a half weeks now, i've learned a few songs, but i can't get one to where i have it down really well. For instance, I know bombtrack really well now, but i can't get parfect it past the point that i have now. This just makes me bored with the song and it really interests me alot more to just start learning a new song. The thing is, once i get that one down, i'll just do the same thing and essentially give up on that song for another one.

Is this kinda normal for a beginner, or should i stick with bombtrack (or one last breath) until i get it to where i can play it flawlessly (for the most part)?
Make Weed Legal

#2
i jumped around a lot. It is important to learn to play clean and smooth though.
I've been playing for... four or five years now? Or something like that, and I can't play a single song from beginning to end.
Quote by brandonian
you nose started bleeding, so the first thing you do is post it on UG? i don't understand the reasoning behind that one my friend



Quote by unplugtheradio
screw grammar i practice economic typing.
#3
everyone is gonna say to just practice more. and that is the only thing to do in your situation. all of us have been in your position but we work through it with time.
Quote by rcw110131
Don't be gay you retard.
#4
Learn some techniques as well, make a practice schedule(trust me in the past month of having one my playing is way better)and stick to learning 2-3 songs, no more or you might mix them up.
#5
you dont need to worry about that for a year or so. it takes a long time to get good at guitar and as long as you keep playing and learning you will get there. i would suggest learning some music theory early on for starters but it takes a very long time to play music at the level of the players (who make a living off of playing guitar because theyre so good at it by the way) that make the music you listen to. it can be a bad habit just to learn riffs and not whole songs eventually in your development but as long as you keep picking up the guitar and getting better you will get there eventually.
#6
Holy crap! It took me longer than 2 weeks to learn to properly wipe my ass when I was a kid. Give it some time, man! It takes lots. The important thing is not to take it too seriously and burn out early. Lots of people give up too soon. Just keep at it. Learn some theory so you can recognize what's happening in a song. Riffs are OK, but unless you have the timing down, know what key you are playing in, etc., etc., you are just developing your dexterity, not your knowledge.

Have fun with it. Do it for yourself, not what others might think of you, and you can look forward to a lifetime of enjoyment.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#8
true, i do keep forgetting i've just barely started and can't expect too much. I gotta remember the words of brandon boyd, "Even Diamonds start as Coal" (great song btw). I just keep getting the chronic fear that i'm gonna get stuck early on and not progress like i should. I'm starting to learn modes and scales and stuff though, the trouble is, i can't really apply either yet, but it'll be good to know now anyway i guess
Make Weed Legal

#9
I did that when I first started playing.
My advice to you is.
when a song gets boring and too hard. move on.
you wont waste time on songs you can't get, and itll save you a lot of frustration.
in the long run, this is bad advice, but when you first start, just build up your technique, speed, and hand strength.
anyways, I think it's probably pretty common for begginners.
good luck man.
#10
Quote by Vulcan
Holy crap! It took me longer than 2 weeks to learn to properly wipe my ass when I was a kid. Give it some time, man! It takes lots. The important thing is not to take it too seriously and burn out early. Lots of people give up too soon. Just keep at it. Learn some theory so you can recognize what's happening in a song. Riffs are OK, but unless you have the timing down, know what key you are playing in, etc., etc., you are just developing your dexterity, not your knowledge.

Have fun with it. Do it for yourself, not what others might think of you, and you can look forward to a lifetime of enjoyment.



How do you "properly" wipe your ass?...front to back? :
(۳ ˚Д˚۳
WTFISTHIS****!?!??


My Rig

Quote by SimplyBen
Wait until he's trying the fullstack, then shove it from behind. Crushing him with it's overdrive


Quote by BobDetroit
You can't tune a LP copies down. Some kind of lawsuit Gibson won. Sorry.
#11
Quote by chrisa123
How do you "properly" wipe your ass?...front to back? :

front to back?! I go back to front, lol

yea man, 2 weeks aint that long. I've been playing for about 4 years, and I still learn new stuff all the time.
#12
Quote by chrisa123
How do you "properly" wipe your ass?...front to back? :


"Properly" = no skid marks later on.

Chicks dig scars. Skid marks annoy them.
PRS SC245
Various Strats
Polytone Mini Brute
Koch Studiotone XL
Quilter OD200, 101 Reverb and Mini
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#13
Quote by ifeastonbums
i jumped around a lot. It is important to learn to play clean and smooth though.
I've been playing for... four or five years now? Or something like that, and I can't play a single song from beginning to end.

I've got that exact same problem, I've been playing for 3 years and it used to be that if I could roughly get the notes right, it was good enough. But now my accuracy isn't great and when I'm playing, I accept a couple of mistakes and tell myself they're not noticeable. But when I record myself and play it back, it awful to listen to. I was even like that half a year ago, but now I've sat down and practised, 'Always With Me, Always With You' isn't hard any more, and hopefully 'Hangar 18' won't get too much harder. ...ha!
Jackson Kelly KE3 w/P-Rails; Aria Pro II TSB-350
• ZVex Fuzz Factory; DigiTech Whammy; Danelectro Fish & Chips; Marshall ED1; Fulltone OCD; DigiTech Whammy; Marshall JMP1; Boss CE3; Vox AC4TV

EMU 0404; Reason/Record; M-Audio AV40
#14
you've only bin playing 2 and a half weeks mate dont worry about it

I've bin playing nearly 2 and a half years and it still happens to me, long as your learning all other essential stuff and actually drawing sumin outa the song in general your fine
Gear:
Dean Razorback V 255 (explosion finish)
Jackson KX10 (amber sunburst)
Yamaha ERG121
random 50 quid acoustic
Randall RG50TC
#15
I was in the same position you were in. For the first like 3 months of my playing, if not more, i'd spend each day on a new song (keep in mind i was learning songs with like 4 power chords in drop d so it didn't take much more than that) and once i got like 5 songs down to the point where i could play em, id run through those five with tuxguitar and then once i got comfortable enough i played along with the song until i could was pretty good at them. Your actual skills probably aren't good enough right now to fully master stuff yet but give it a few months and it'll clean up.

3 suggestions for things i'm doing now but wish id done when i started
1) Learn scales early on, running through them will help speed, control and your theory, they're all around great improvers
2) Get used to alternate picking AS SOON AS YOU DO ANY LEAD STUFF. I went in thinking eh, il do it when i need it, nothings too fast now. Well down picking everything doesn't work as long as you think it will, do it now!
3) Record yourself. Yeah you'll probably screw up because its being recorded but it'll help with your timing and you can see and hear any problems or technique issues

But give it time, 2.5 weeks and one song down fairly well isn't half bad! Keep up the good work!
Gibson Les Paul Studio Deluxe/Ibanez RGA42/LTD EC401vf
Into:
Whammy IV>Pitchblack>Dunlop 536Q>Fulltone Fulldrive 2>Hardwire TL-2>MXR 10 Band>Line 6 M13
Into:
80s Carvin x100b w/ cab
#16
You could move onto another song or practice something else to get your technique up. Then maybe a few weeks or month then try playing the song again and it should seem a lot easier to master. Might not work for everyone though
[img]http://www.danasoft.com/sig/Lookatthis97787.jpg[/img]
#17
Quote by hopespaul
patience is golden


I agree with this. If you're having trouble with the song, play it slower, and build up from there. If you're still having trouble, then put it away. Chances are you'll get better, and then you can pull out the song again. I remember wanting to learn all these hard solos when I first picked up guitar. Even playing them slow, I had a hard time. Zoom forward a few years, and I remember "Oh yeah, I wanted to learn that song." It was amazing how much easier it was play. But whatever you do, patience is the key. And don't take it so seriously, or else you'll never enjoy it.
#18
1. Getting good at a song that's hard. The answer is speed. Get a metronome (there are any number of free programs for your computer) and go slow. It will barely sound like the song you're trying to play. It's not on youtube that I can find, but on the Rock Discipline DVD there is a backstage clip of John Petrucci warming up before a show. Do you know what he is doing? He is practicing "difficult passages." At full speed? No! He's playing a solo that normally goes 240 bpm at, get this, 60 bpm. Slow it down until you can play it cleanly and don't deviate from the tempo. One of the worst things you can do is to go: one two three, one two three, one t(can't quite get the chord) wo, three, one, two, three. Even if it's painfully slow through everything else, keep the pace that you can do perfect. Identify your weakness.

2. Make sure that whatever you are learning you learn what you are really playing. This will ramble a bit, stick with me. Don't look at tabs and go pinkey here, index finger there. I've been playing off and on for nearly 10 years (probably only a total of 3 if you go practicing 4 days a week) and I had this same Achilles heel ever since my first trumpet lessons (before playing guitar). Notes on a staff were just finger shapes. Don't even ask me to change keys. I was openly accused in class (probably in 4th grade) of purposely screwing up. I was actually told to leave class. I didn't know how to play a sharp note! I did not have the clarity of thought to tell the instructor that he didn't teach me that what shape goes with the pound sign. This transferred to guitar. G was a shape, D was a shape. It was not until I played bass for a year or two that things started to connect. It certainly made it easier to start moving chords around the neck.

You don't have to learn what all the notes in a chord are, but certainly learning the root notes will make a world of difference. Right? The root note of an open G chord is a G, and it is located on the third fret on the low E string. It's basic, it may even be patronizing, but it's important and there are a lot of people that lack that knowledge. Beyond that, work on the scale modes. I don't really know them (and doubt I will have the time to dedicate to that any time soon), but there's a great moment when you go, "by jove that sounds like that solo is based of a Dorian scale. Oh my, it is a Dorian scale!"

3. One other thing, before you go looking for chord charts and tabs for songs, give a shot at playing it by ear. I am frequently guilty of not doing this, but I can remember the sense of satisfaction when I played my first song without ever turning on the computer. Chords can be difficult to nail down, but just play the root (kind of like if you were playing bass) and then go ahead and check out a tab to see how close you were. Doing this will help you develop as a musician, and generally help you to feel good about yourself. The Liquid Tension Experiment song State of Grace is a great one to do this with. It's a great song, it's pretty accessible (as in not too hard to get a starting frame of reference), it's a major hit with the ladies, and you'll have the benefit of being able to say that you learned to play a John Petrucci song just by listening to it.

By the way, I may have an extra copy of John Petrucci's Rock Discipline DVD: new and unopened. It's probably not the holy grail of instructional DVDs but it's pretty dang good. For the warmups alone, it's almost worth it (although I know for a fact those are up on youtube) If anyone is interested, PM me and we'll figure something out.
#19
i dont thnk its too much of a problem
you justgot fnd something to keep intrested


maybe do a bit of jamming either with mates or by your self
also even like metal ppl gte bored and for beginners find a classic riff
often there more fun to play
and satifsfying to hear your self playing
because there played so much