#1
This:

e|---
B|-3
G|--
D|-4
A|-5
E|--
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#2
It is part of a D chord.... add in the F# and A on the e and G string respectively.
#3
Technically, I believe it's a D major double-stop. Which means it's not a chord at all.
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#4
its an inversion of a d5 chord.
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#5
okay, thank you!
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#6
Quote by ACFCPatrick
its an inversion of a d5 chord.

D5 has D and A in it so any inversion would aswell.

This chord has D and F# so it wouldn't be and inversion of D5. I would probably call it a D major chord without the 5th but technically it wouldn't be a chord at all because it only has two notes, so it would be a diad.
#7
Play the 2nd fret on the G string with that chord. You'll love it.

It's not a chord per se by the definition "3 tones being played harmonically" but it's D major (a lot of music implies chords because parallel fifths are teh badzorz ).
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#8
Of course we are all assuming based on the tab you've written that you are only playing the A D and B strings and that the E and G strings are not sounded at all.
Si
#9
Quote by 20Tigers
Of course we are all assuming based on the tab you've written that you are only playing the A D and B strings and that the E and G strings are not sounded at all.
There are 0's for that
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#10
Quote by metal4all
There are 0's for that

Yes there are, but sometimes people think it's assumed.
There are also X's for muted strings. From what he's written you would have to fingerpick the chord or play it as an arpeggio.
I was just double checking, kind of reading back to the TS what he's written so that he can think to himself "yeah that's right" or "oh actually I'm playing the G string and make an edit.

It is a major third and an octave - D F# D.
Another way to play the same thing might be
e|---
b|---
g|-7-
d|-4-
a|-5-
e|---

which is a prelude to my question, could you label this D3?
Si
#11
It's just a D Major chord with an omitted fifth.
If the open strings are used, it could be an E 7 sharp 9 with an ambiguous third?
#12
Quote by Sumlover41
This:

e|---
B|-3
G|--
D|-4
A|-5
E|--

that's basically a c major, moved up to d, minus an f# and an a

bar 2nd fret under that, and aviod E, to do a full Dmaj
e|-2
B|-3
G|-2
D|-4
A|-5
E|--
#13
its a d major diad, so its technically not a chord
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