#1
Alright so i've had this problem for a while and it's understanding which scales can be used over which chords and when. I've read the theory help thing in bangoodcharlotte's sig and I've also watched Melodic Control with Marty Friedman, yet I'm still confused. Can I get some help/clear explanations on this?

Also, what's a good scale to use when playing bass under a chord progression that goes E major, A major, B major?

Thanks
#2
That's an E major progression. Use E major.
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#3
ok but then when would i use scales like mixolydian and stuff...im pretty sure there's no such thing as a mixolydian progression...or is there?
#5
Mixolydian's just another mode. The song's in E major so you can use that. If there's a chord progression based off a mixolydian scale then it's appropriate there but for now, stick with E major.
#6
Quote by mattj2192
ok but then when would i use scales like mixolydian and stuff...im pretty sure there's no such thing as a mixolydian progression...or is there?


Firstly, The chord Progression you asked about is a very common I IV V chord progression in the E major Scale.

Secondly, there technically is just the Mixolydian mode of the major scale. This mode is based off the fifth of the major scale and as such you would use it over the V chord or in a progression in which the V chord is emphasized.

It sounds as though you should learn the basics such as interval relations first, maybe the guy above me's links will help, but I didn't check them out.
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#7
i have a basic understanding of intervals but are you saying that i would have to change the scale i use for every chord change?
#8
Quote by mattj2192
i have a basic understanding of intervals but are you saying that i would have to change the scale i use for every chord change?


No

But Let's Say we're in C Major which has all natural notes, C D E F G A B. Now let's say the Chord Progression is a I IV V chord progression; Cmaj Fmaj and Gmaj. That Chord progression is in the Ionian mode of C Major since it focuses on just a regular C major scale, and the C is treated as the tonic.

However, if the Rhythm were V ii IV then you would be in The Mixolydian mode of the C Major scale, since it has the notes of C major but the G is emphasized
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#9
E major, A major, B major all fit in the E-major scale anyway, so just stay in E.
#10
Quote by mattj2192
i have a basic understanding of intervals but are you saying that i would have to change the scale i use for every chord change?
No. You can usually stick to one scale and be fine.

Sometimes you might change scales for specific chords. But don't let that scare you, changing to a different scale can be as little as changing one note in your pattern and basing your ideas around a different note.

For example C major might see you playing some melodies based around the C note using the notes C D E F G A B C. Then if you change to G major you would sharp the F and play some ideas based around the G note using the notes G A B C D E F# G.
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