#1
Not sure if this goes in bandleading or not, so pardon me if this is iffy...

So, a few friends and I have organized a band. The drummer, keyboardist, and lead guitarist have all been playing for more than three years. I have been playing for 10 months but keep up with them anyway. (Extreme practice, FTW ) Anyhow, we were left bassist-less for a while, as the only bassist we knew of was tied up in another band.

Our keyboardist talked to a mutual friend, and found it he was, in fact, a bassist. Since there was no other person we knew that owned a bass (why must you bassists be so rare, why?!!) we asked him to join.

First time we all get together to jam, we find out he literally knows NOTHING about playing his instrument. And I don't mean "nothing" like, "Wait, we're playing in the Augmented Mixolydian Mode with a flat third? Whazzat?", I mean "nothing" as in he came with his bass tuned 2 and 1/2 steps higher than standard.

So, basically, now we have to train him in the art of bass. I already directed him to some basic instructional vids and told him to practice keeping time religiously. Other than this, what should he be learning to be an efficient bassist? We're not too concerned about him learning theory, as our leads and keyboards are both *very* well versed in that.

Thanks.
#2
The best thing is to get him a teacher, but why not direct him here?
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#4
Quote by 022044
(Extreme practice, FTW )

Perhaps it might work for him?
Notes on the fretboard would be another big thing to teach him, save you time.
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#5
Quote by FFTLxx
Perhaps it might work for him?
Notes on the fretboard would be another big thing to teacher him, save you time.


Did this, too. One of the first things we went over.
#6
just laugh at him for being a bassist that he couldn't learn a proper instrument.
#7
or if it takes too long find another bassisst. but thats not a really good option hehe

bt yea. best way is to teach him as he goes. hardout musicians never learned to read sheet music, like paul mccartney.
#8
Quote by jack_demo
just laugh at him for being a bassist that he couldn't learn a proper instrument.


Pathetic bassist bashing attempt fails.
#9
the reason we bassits are so rare is everyone wants to shred on guitar lol
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#10
Quote by Gofretless
Pathetic bassist bashing attempt fails.

No, you fail for being a bassist.
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#11
Quote by jack_demo
just laugh at him for being a bassist that he couldn't learn a proper instrument.


warned...

Quote by Shreddies_1990
No, you fail for being a bassist.


and warned.


Back to the topic at hand, TS. First off, theory is important for a bass player. To create basslines, you need some semblance of chord theory, scales, rhythm etc unless you expect him to bash out root note quarter notes the rest of his stay with the band.

There a quite a few good resources out there for learning bass. Check out the FAQ in the bass forum as well as books (there's a list of them in FAQ somewhere buried towards the end of the thread). Hal Leonards Bass Method I - III will give him a decent grounding and teach him to sight read. A teacher would be ideal, but it sounds like you have made that suggestion already.

Experience is a great teacher and if you and the rest of the band have quite a bit of patience (and I mean quite a bit of patience) over time, he could gain some valuable in the trenches learning as he goes. But if he's not willing to take your helpful advice, as rare as bass players are, it may be better for both of you to part ways and for you to find another bass player.
#12
Quote by Shreddies_1990
No, you fail for being a bassist.


Quote by jack_demo
just laugh at him for being a bassist that he couldn't learn a proper instrument.


Honestly, thats the most ingorant thing people could say. If bassists are such a rareity, why even make fun of them because you're going to need one. Oh well, I'm in a few projects where people respect my ability and my ear as a bassist. I sure hope you two can say the same about yourselves.

But to TS...I congrat you for sticking with him. It will be a long process, but be patient with him. It's important that your band does not get impatient and make him feel inadequate. Help him along the way, and it will only increase your ability to teach and the band itself! Hopefully, it goes well!
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#13
Bassists arn't rare. Their a dime a dozen where i live. What is with the stigma of people calling bassist "rare" like their some special breed of endanger animals with super powers? Almost anyone can pick up a bass and sound good with it, thats why its more popular then guitar.

TS, ou should just mold and shape him into the type of player you want for your band. That is the best way he will learn. Don't scare him with theory just yet, just get him used to useing his ears and jam with him as much as possible. And yes most beggining and intermediat bassist know next to nothing about theory,this is common like with your freind, because they think its just plucking beats with 4 big stings, and it looks damn easy to most people then compared to a guitar.

Hey, we all gotta start somewhere, i think you should tell him to approach it more as a fun project then a serious band at the moment.
#14
where i live u cant find a ****ing drummer
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#15
he can either do extreme practice ftw, or it isnt hard to say "you're not up to par, but a cool guy. it just doesnt work musically, sorry bro."

if you're not concerned with teaching him theory, make sure he learns proper technique for the various ways to play bass: fingerstyle, tapping, picking, slapping & popping.
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#16
Quote by 022044
"Wait, we're playing in the Augmented Mixolydian Mode with a flat third? Whazzat?"


Maybe you should have asked him what he can play before you invited him to join the band.

And don't get all arrogent with the I-know-what-this-key-is-and-the-bassist-doesnt-so-hes-fail. It's not fair on him for you to be this obnoxious.

I don't have a clue what the hell you're on about with your mixolydian modes shit and I do fine in my band. Earn £50/£60 a night, play gigs every couple of weeks.

The simple matter is - making a good band isn't the fact you can play in this scale or that mode or with this flat, it's about working together to write songs that you like to play and that audiences like to hear.

Tbh, just have him playing root notes underneath the chords that you give him - it'll teach him rhythm, technique, start him off. Don't be rude about it, don't get vexed when it takes him some time to develop and help him help the band move forward and write good songs.

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#17
Quote by Jonnomainman
Maybe you should have asked him what he can play before you invited him to join the band.

And don't get all arrogent with the I-know-what-this-key-is-and-the-bassist-doesnt-so-hes-fail. It's not fair on him for you to be this obnoxious.

I don't have a clue what the hell you're on about with your mixolydian modes shit and I do fine in my band. Earn £50/£60 a night, play gigs every couple of weeks.

The simple matter is - making a good band isn't the fact you can play in this scale or that mode or with this flat, it's about working together to write songs that you like to play and that audiences like to hear.

Tbh, just have him playing root notes underneath the chords that you give him - it'll teach him rhythm, technique, start him off. Don't be rude about it, don't get vexed when it takes him some time to develop and help him help the band move forward and write good songs.

this is what I would have said if I was feeling eloquent yesterday. he should learn keys, but he doesn't need to yet. just some roots.
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#18
Quote by Bathory fan
Bassists arn't rare. Their a dime a dozen where i live. What is with the stigma of people calling bassist "rare" like their some special breed of endanger animals with super powers? Almost anyone can pick up a bass and sound good with it, thats why its more popular then guitar.


Bassists here aren't rare either.
Good bassists are though.
There is probably somewhere between fifteen and twenty bassists at my high school and only three of us know what we're doing with it. But this goes for just about any instrument. There are a lot of guitarists but only a handful are really good.

Edit: fixed.
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#19
...since when are bassists more common than guitarists?
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#20
Quote by Victory2134
Bassists here aren't rare either.
Good bassists are though.
There is probably somewhere between fifteen and twenty bassists at my high school and only three of us know what we're doing with it. But this goes for just about any instrument. There are a lot of guitarists but only a handful are really good.

Edit: fixed.


yeah. at my school we have about 30-35 bassiest. and maybe 5 or 7 are good in the whole school. most people play cause they think its easier than guitar. which is sad cause i find guitar easier. and tell your bassiest to practice. i have no teacher and learned alot of stuff before this site and i learned how to read music without a teacher. or UG.
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#21
Quote by bt99
where i live u cant find a ****ing drummer


Where I live it's that and bassists. That's one reason why being a bassist is so awesome, and the main reason I picked bass over guitar.
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#22
Quote by randomhero65
Honestly, thats the most ingorant thing people could say. If bassists are such a rareity, why even make fun of them because you're going to need one. Oh well, I'm in a few projects where people respect my ability and my ear as a bassist. I sure hope you two can say the same about yourselves.

But to TS...I congrat you for sticking with him. It will be a long process, but be patient with him. It's important that your band does not get impatient and make him feel inadequate. Help him along the way, and it will only increase your ability to teach and the band itself! Hopefully, it goes well!

Second only to "The Holocaust is a lie."

TS, while he's in the process of learning... if you've got a few melodically talented people in your band as you say, you might want to consider having one of you write his basslines until he gets familiar enough with his instrument to do that himself. If you're melodically talented, the bass can put out some sexilicious backing lines, solo backs, dropout fills, etc., and still manage to be easy as pie to play. For examples, see the post-solo bridge in "No One Knows" by Queens of the Stone Age, the second verse to "Burn, Burn" by Lostprophets, and oodles more.

Best of luck.
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