#1
Hi

I was looking again at chord construction in my lunch break in work but I've come accross one that has me a bit stumped, can anyone shed some light on it, thanks.


e-x--
B-1--
G-2--
D-2--
A-0--
E-2--


I named this chord twice differently as:

Am/F# - internet tells me it is Am6/F# (do you have to add the F# as a 6th even if it is the bass note?)

Second name I gave it was:

F#dim(with a b7, unsure how to write it addb7?)

In this bottom example does the 7th take precesdence over the 5th? so it ishould be F#m7b5?

Thanks for any response to this.
#4
Thanks that's what I though but now a chord namer on the internet is throwing Am6/F# at me and I don't know what to think.

^20 tigers, thanks makes sense now
#5
F# is a sixth above A.
so an Am6 is an Am with an F# added.
Am6/F# shows you where to play the F# - namely in the bass.

You achieve the same effect by just writing it as Am/F#
Si
#6
Quote by Helpy Helperton
Thanks that's what I though but now a chord namer on the internet is throwing Am6/F# at me and I don't know what to think.


those automatic chord namers are stupid
#7
There's no right or wrong answer on how to name it. Ignore the chord namer. You'd name that chord depending on the harmonic context.

F#m7b5
Am/F#

Quote by Helpy Helperton
(do you have to add the F# as a 6th even if it is the bass note?)

I would remove the '6' from Am, definately, it's already metioned as the bass note. If it's metioned twice then it gives the impression that you'd have to voice it in 2 places when playing it. Which is fine by all means.
Last edited by mdc at Oct 23, 2008,
#8
It can be F#m7b5 or Am6/F# depending on the context. Like this -without any context- I
would name it F#m7b5 cause the root is F#.

It's not a F#dim cause it consists of 1 b3 b5. The chord you play has: 1 b3 b5 b7.

So 'F#dimb7' = F#m7b5
#9
Quote by seljer
those automatic chord namers are stupid


I disagree, this one seems pretty reliable so far, (mainly to check my working against until I'm positive i've got the basics down)

I would be fine seeing an Am6/F# or Am/F# and be able to play it but it's when it comes to naming the chord for say writing it down or telling someone else I would begin to doubt my naming of it. I don't really want to stand out as the guy who names chords the really wierd way, just trying to get a feel for common chord namings. Thanks for the replies, i think i have it.

Cheers
Last edited by Helpy Helperton at Oct 23, 2008,
#10
This is technically just a diminished 7 chord with a different name, yes? Or no, cause you would use a diatonic scale over it?
#11
Quote by rollininrhythm
This is technically just a diminished 7 chord with a different name, yes? Or no, cause you would use a diatonic scale over it?


Its a diminished triad with a min7th.
Commonly called "half-diminished 7th" to distinguish it from a diminished triad with a diminished seventh, which is called a "diminished 7th".
And it is one of the diatonic chords of the major mode (vii7), cf the fully diminished which isn't..
Last edited by R.Christie at Oct 23, 2008,
#13
I thought when using "slash chords", the bass note must be stated in the chord previously (F# in this case). Since Am doesn't have an F# note in it, you'd have to make it Am6 to be able to show the F# in the bass, wouldn't you?

I might be wrong, that's why I'm asking.
#14
I thought using "slash chords" meant a certain chord played over a specific bass note. I don't think that the bass note "must" be noted in the original chord. Stating F# is the bass note X/F# is enough to show the F# is present in the chord.

I think sometimes when you have an ascending or descending bass note over a single chord it can more descriptive of what is happening if you don't try to include the bass note in the chord name before the slash.

Even with the chord in question if I saw Am6/F# without tab or notation, I would finger Am6 then add an F# bass over top with my thumb. This would give me a different voicing than what TS has described in his tab as I would be playing the 2nd fret of the high e string to get the Am6 part before adding the F# bass over top. (not that it would make a heck of a lot of difference in this case.)

This might just be the way I think though.
Si
#18
Quote by one vision
^Btw you spelled "Marty Friedman" wrong in your sig.
Christ, you're right, and I'm Jewish!

Edit: Upon, further research, I'll assume he knows how to spell his own surname.
#20
Quote by one vision
Oh it was deliberate?
I'm not quite sure what you mean, but "Friedman" is a fairly common last name for Jews, much like names involving "Rose," "Feld," "Berg," "Stein," and "Gold." Thus, I should know how to spell it.