#1
I have an unusually low vocal range. I just tested mine to see how low i can go and I can hit the C below E2. T can't quite hit middle C. Is this bad? That would make my range lower than a bass. What is below bass?

BTW I don't know if this is in the right spot. I'm sorry if it's not.
#2
Quote by coryklok
I have an unusually low vocal range. I just tested mine to see how low i can go and I can hit the C below E2. T can't quite hit middle C. Is this bad? That would make my range lower than a bass. What is below bass?

BTW I don't know if this is in the right spot. I'm sorry if it's not.



That's your range, how could it possibly be bad? There is no specific range that is considered the "good" range.

Now you know what your range is, go ahead and utilize it.
shred is gaudy music
#3
yeah +1 on the comment above me. theres no "good" range. different ranges have different uses. your range is pretty BA imo.
#4
Quote by GuitarMunky
That's your range, how could it possibly be bad? There is no specific range that is considered the "good" range.

Now you know what your range is, go ahead and utilize it.

Thank you for your insight.
That is all.
#5
dont feel bad bro theres a guy in my choir class that has a range similar to yours, he can hit the A below the bass staff and his voice is really powerful like you can feel him singing. i say use it to the best of your ability cause its a gift.
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#6
It's not bad, my choir is always in need of bass singers, all of the guys are baritone or tenor.
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
That's your range, how could it possibly be bad? There is no specific range that is considered the "good" range.

Now you know what your range is, go ahead and utilize it.
I dunno, if you're trying out for a choir wouldnt a basso or a soprano be prefered because there arent many of them? But if you're trying to be a pop-star (oh god no) wouldnt you want to be something around a tenor?
#10
Quote by coryklok
BTW I don't know if this is in the right spot. I'm sorry if it's not.

The ONLY singing tips sticky thread maybe?
#11
Do you smoke by chance?

Smoking kills off high notes but can (and most of the time does) add more low-end range.

Also, just for the sake of it, try to do vocal sirens and such and see if you can't stretch your range to middle C, because any vocalist should be able to sing a middle C.
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#13
Quote by Idiosyncracy
Do you smoke by chance?

Smoking kills off high notes but can (and most of the time does) add more low-end range.

Also, just for the sake of it, try to do vocal sirens and such and see if you can't stretch your range to middle C, because any vocalist should be able to sing a middle C.


What are vocal sirens?
#15
Vocal sirens are, IMHO, an over-rated and kind of silly way of exercising your voice.

You are a bass. A bass should be able to sing the C below the low E on the guitar (you can) up to middle C. A good singer should have a two octave range. You're pretty darn close. I'd place my bets that with a bit of work you could get that middle C to get you to two octaves.

No matter what you're doing, the middle/average types are always easiest to find, and the extremes more difficult. It is equally difficult to find a true tenor who can sing up to the C above middle C. Most choral tenors and pop singers are actually baritones who top out around G or a little higher. I can squawk out a Bb on most days and a B on a good day in full voice. As I say.... those middle voices are the most common.

Very good advice above about 'find your voice and make the best of it.'

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#16
Quote by demonofthenight
I dunno, if you're trying out for a choir wouldnt a basso or a soprano be prefered because there arent many of them? But if you're trying to be a pop-star (oh god no) wouldnt you want to be something around a tenor?


You are what you are. Better utilize what you have to the best of your abilities, than to force yourself into a place that you weren't meant to go.

that doesn't mean you can't work to extend your range, but be realistic. don't be ashamed of what you are, but instead utilize what you have to offer to its fullest potential.
shred is gaudy music
#17
Quote by axemanchris
Vocal sirens are, IMHO, an over-rated and kind of silly way of exercising your voice.

You are a bass. A bass should be able to sing the C below the low E on the guitar (you can) up to middle C. A good singer should have a two octave range. You're pretty darn close. I'd place my bets that with a bit of work you could get that middle C to get you to two octaves.

No matter what you're doing, the middle/average types are always easiest to find, and the extremes more difficult. It is equally difficult to find a true tenor who can sing up to the C above middle C. Most choral tenors and pop singers are actually baritones who top out around G or a little higher. I can squawk out a Bb on most days and a B on a good day in full voice. As I say.... those middle voices are the most common.

Very good advice above about 'find your voice and make the best of it.'

CT



They're completely overrated except for when you need to relax your voice after a while, and they definitely help to get the upper range working in the morning or if you haven't warmed up.

Basically, what you do is go from the lowest pitch you can make audibly to the highest, into the falsetto, etc, then go back down.

TS, if you're going to work your upper range, don't do it so much that it hurts (as you can damage your lower range if not careful)...if you start to feel your throat tighten, roll your head and stretch through your neck a few times, and breathe deeply through your nose 6 or 7 times and you should be back in business.

ps axemanchris - you just gave me a HUGE ego boost because I can get a C naturally and on a good say an E or an F kudos to you sir.
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Kramer Striker (JB + Jazz)
Amps
Blackstar HT-5C
Vox Valvetronix AD30VT-XL
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Dunlop DB-01 Crybaby From Hell
Digitech HardWire CM-2 Tube Overdrive
Boss DS-1
#18
That is a pretty low range, which is good. However, when I started singing, I think I could barely hit middle C (1st fret on B string of a guitar). After getting used to my voice and practicing, I can now almost hit the F# above middle C (2nd fret on high E string) and I can sing as low as Eb2 I think (one semitone below open on low E string), still working on hitting that low D!
#19
Quote by Idiosyncracy

ps axemanchris - you just gave me a HUGE ego boost ...


Great! The best part about that is that half of the battle (at least half, actually) is having the confidence to do it in the first place. If you think you can, then you just might be able to. If you think you can't.... yer f-ed.

A good ego boost never goes amiss.

Except for those damned prima-donna singers.

.... er.... ahhhh..... wait a sec....

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.