#1
so i saw this on a t shirt and i dont know what the hell it means, and i cant find it anywhere, does anyone know what it means?
The Dude abides
Last edited by Rockon914 at Oct 24, 2008,
#2
Looks like latin.

Which then it would be I think "The day of Metal" That is assuming that metallum is the word for metal.
#3
Quote by Guitarfreak777
Looks like latin.

Which then it would be I think "The day of Metal" That is assuming that metallum is the word for metal.


ok cool, ya that sounds about right
The Dude abides
#4
Quote by Rockon914
ok cool, ya that sounds about right



Sorry I got my words mixed up.

Carpe means to seize roughly and Metallum means metal i'm guessing (can't find it)

So Roughly it would say "Seize the Metal" I'm guessing because Carpe Diem means "Seize The Day"
#5
Quote by Guitarfreak777
Sorry I got my words mixed up.

Carpe means to seize roughly and Metallum means metal i'm guessing (can't find it)

So Roughly it would say "Seize the Metal" I'm guessing because Carpe Diem means "Seize The Day"


o ok thanks
The Dude abides
#7
Actually, Carpe Diem is mistranslated as "Seize the Day". The phrase was said by Ovid in one of his poems, and is often mistranslated because it's an awesome war phrase if seize is used in the translation. However, Ovid, being the peace-loving poet, who often criticized war and rome's war-mongering emperors, actually meant "Pluck the Day" meaning, when paraphrased, "Pluck the best parts of the day and remember/hold onto them, because they're good."
Quote by metaldud536
Yes. When the shield generator on Endor has been deactivated, Rogue Squadron is easily able to enter the Death Star II without repurcussions.

...And that's how menstruation works.
#8
Quote by Maidenhell666
Actually, Carpe Diem is mistranslated as "Seize the Day". The phrase was said by Ovid in one of his poems, and is often mistranslated because it's an awesome war phrase if seize is used in the translation. However, Ovid, being the peace-loving poet, who often criticized war and rome's war-mongering emperors, actually meant "Pluck the Day" meaning, when paraphrased, "Pluck the best parts of the day and remember/hold onto them, because they're good."
So then, it would be literally translated as saying 'pluck metal'.

I think it's an imperative statement, in which the t-shirt is suggesting that viewers play the guitar, by 'plucking the metal strings'.*

* (inferred sections italicized)