Poll: Learning: Teachers vs Self
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View poll results: Learning: Teachers vs Self
Lessons for 1-2 years, then quit
14 19%
Lessons for 2-3 years, then ditched
4 6%
Lessons for 3 years and still going
12 17%
No Lessons from a teacher, all me baby!
40 56%
Learning someway else...
2 3%
Voters: 72.
#1
Ok, how many people have learn the guitar by themselves to how many are / have learned by a teacher or private lessons? I am 1.5 years into private lessons and I am not learn much but at the sametime am not the best guitarist. So I am wondering to switch teachers or just try to improve on my own.
If you took lessons, how long until you quit?
音乐是生活
Music is Life


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Last edited by ehwalled at Oct 24, 2008,
#2
I have received classes till last year because I left my country. I like the classes because they tought me theory better, im just to lazy to learn theory right by myself now.
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#3
I am self-taught through tabs and random stuff on the Internet. Downside is I don't know anything about theory. Tried to learn a few times and found myself lost and given up.
#4
see that is the stupid thing, the guy i learn from right now will not teach me theory or anything about technique. he just gives me tabs. i am realizing he sucks and is a waste of my time.
音乐是生活
Music is Life


Ibanez RG2550Z, Edwards Jimmy Page LP Relic Custom, 06 Fender Clapton SS, Line6 Spider III 112, Peavey Classic 30, Boss HD-1, Boss Green Label Chorus, Boss SD1 Overdrive, MXR Fuzz, Blues Breaker
#5
My suggestions is that you continue the lessons at least another year. During that period, you should be teaching yourself besides the lessons. I have been playing for almost 4 years now and I consider myself pretty advanced. In the begining I had a teacher that taught me the very important basics like improv with the blues scale. Then my next teacher taught me power chords and the pentatonic scale and how to improv. Now i am amazing at improv. while i was taking lessons, i would practice for 2-3 hrs a day (unless random life crap got in the way) teaching myself stuff that my teacher didnt. learn the basics and some advanced stuff from a teacher and teach yourself also
#6
I've been teaching myself for about a year now, and although I consider myself an intermediate (I can play most stuff, except Constant Motion's solo/other insane monster crazy songs) but I feel i've hit a brick wall with improvisation.

Oh, and the guy up there is right, teaching yourself = zilcho knowledge of theory. I mean sure you can learn it, but last time I tried it felt like I was trying to learn French from a physical education class.
You know, you're probably reading this saying "Hey, I'm bored, maybe this'll be funny?"
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#7
I taught myself for a few years, and just recently started taking lessons back in July of this year. I learned to play alot of things on my own, but couldn't understand lead playing, and had no idea about anything to do with theory. After trying to learn lead, because I had been playing rythem since then, I had given up and decided to get a teacher. I think this way worked well for me, because ussually when taking lessons at first the teachers will have you progress pretty slowly. The way I'm doing it, I already know how to play, but I have lessons to give me extra help.

If you're taking lessons now and the teacher isn't teaching you theory or anything then I'd strongly suggest ditching him and finding another teacher. Since July, I've noticed that theory can play a big part in any type of music, and I think it's important for all musicians to learn atleast some of it. Another thing is, I see alot of people only practicing the things that there teachers give them and nothing else. I myself don't think that's a good idea at all. What my teacher gives me I'll ussually finish in a day, or I'll practice it in sections through out the week and work on other things in between. I know alot of people are self taught, and some are what I would call pretty good musicians, but not everybody has whatever it takes to do that.

If I were in your possition, I'd stop taking lessons with the teacher you have now if he/she isn't teaching your properly. Take a little time off from a teacher and work your ass off learning what you can on your own. While you're doing that, maybe stop by some local shops or ask around and see if anybody would be able to suggest you a good teacher at a resonable price. Maybe go through some of the lessons on this site, or try learning some of the songs you like on your own. Whatever you do, don't give up on learning guitar. If you find tab or something to a song you really want to learn but you think it's to difficult, just keep going at it. If you start slow, maybe watch some videos of others playing the same song to get an idea of how to do thing, then it will eventually start coming to you.

Bottom line, hard work pays off. If you feel a good teacher will somehow help that, then your best bet is to find a good teacher and go from there.


**I love when I give others advice when most the stuff I say is stuff I should be saying to myself.**
#8
I have never been taught by a teacher but you should gather as much information as you can. RR and Nergal from behemoth still used guitar teachers.
#9
Quote by Snap017
I've been teaching myself for about a year now, and although I consider myself an intermediate (I can play most stuff, except Constant Motion's solo/other insane monster crazy songs) but I feel i've hit a brick wall with improvisation.

Oh, and the guy up there is right, teaching yourself = zilcho knowledge of theory. I mean sure you can learn it, but last time I tried it felt like I was trying to learn French from a physical education class.



Thats you. I have a pretty good knowledge of theory and millions of other musicians. Teachers IMO are just teaching you what they learned and probably nothing else. They teach you what they understand and explain things in detail most of the time. They are very good to use but a hell of a lot of money to have.
#10
Self Study - Been playing for 3 years but I'm not taking it seriously, I practice when I want to, I like playing metal core songs and make instrumental versions of some songs, I know a little about Music Theories and Scales...I can play some Bullet for my Valentine songs including their solos and other songs (Just saying)

It doesn't matter how long have you been playing, the important thing is how you practice

Having a teacher would be great, you CAN learn fast and you'll be guided

But if you want to study by yourself, I think it's best to practice seriously, always start slow, gather information as much as you can

With or without a teacher, the result will always depend on you

Quote by caraluzzo

**I love when I give others advice when most the stuff I say is stuff I should be saying to myself.**


Me too. LOL
"... I don't want you to play me a riff that's going to impress Joe Satriani; give me a riff that makes a kid want to go out and buy a guitar and learn to play ..." - Ozzy Osbourne

"Play the music, not the instrument."
#11
I've had piano lessons for 9 years, then quit (the lessons, not the piano), and took on guitar.

So my guitar playing is 100% self made, but I did have a pretty solid knowledge of theory already.

I'm pretty sure it's possible to learn the guitar all by yourself.
Thomas hopes to not have offended anyone with this post. No responsibility whatsoever is taken for any spelling or grammar mistakes, should there be any.

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#12
hooray for teaching yourself using online Tabs
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#13
i had about 3 lessons but my teacher was a junkie and he'd just put a dvd of ac/dc in and talked about how awesome angus young was. he also didn't mind me not paying him for that. he was a crap teacher but we became good friends after.

never had lessons after that though
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#14
thanks all, think i will ditch the teacher and find a new one
音乐是生活
Music is Life


Ibanez RG2550Z, Edwards Jimmy Page LP Relic Custom, 06 Fender Clapton SS, Line6 Spider III 112, Peavey Classic 30, Boss HD-1, Boss Green Label Chorus, Boss SD1 Overdrive, MXR Fuzz, Blues Breaker
#15
I don't think you should just ditch him. Ask him to do theory with you, if that's what you really want.

I've been taking lessons for nearly two years. I have a friend who's been playing for about a year, without lessons, and he's at way less than half my skill level. I think lessons work, but it all depends on the person, their style, their attention span, and how serious they are about the instrument.
#16
Before bass lessons i taught my self for 2 years, and in less than six months of lessons, Ive become a beast. but that's me. What it comes down to is getting a good teacher who makes learning theory relevant to what you do. like if the guy just shows you songs, he's not doing much for you, but if it's all theory and no practical use, it's no fun. So if he can make learning how to play a passage in C#11 Major relevant to you, than go for it
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#17
I am completely self taught. I have been playing for 4 years. If you have patience and a passion for playing then I would say learn on your own. You need patience though, it took me 2 and a half years to play a song (because I am not musically gifted so I had to really struggle to play), but I have used UG from the day I learned to read tabs up to now which has been about 3 years. I personally feel, and this is just me, that learning on your own allows you to play with more feel. You don't spend so much time worrying about how to do things the technical or right way, you play what feels and sounds right. Just find whatever way suits you best and go with it. For me I never had patience for theory or learning the basics, I jumped right into playing songs which is why I struggled until the day I played Like A Stone all the way through, and its been smooth sailing since then. Some learn better with a teacher, some better without, for example Zakk Wylde learned from teachers and studied music, Brian Haner Jr. (aka Syn Gates of A7X) was self taught, just pick your way and PRACTICE PRACTICE PRACTICE.
Last edited by in2thesun88 at Oct 26, 2008,
#18
Self taught and playing for 8 months. I can play most scales, alot of songs by underoath, anberlin, skillet, and kutless. The most difficult one for me to play is the Feel Good Drag, by anberlin. Also they have like 3-4 guitars in one song. (not including bass) The point here is that i've learned faster by myself. My uncle has probobly passed on his talent to me. I can already tune the guitar by ear. (almost perfect) and pick out chords in a song. But thats just me and lots and lots of practice soar wrist and fingers for a few months. But now it has been totally worth it.
#19
Can somebody tell me what counts as ''learning theory''? Because In my 6 or so months now I've learned all the notes on the fretboard and I think it's a big step. I haven't had a teacher but I've just used this website and video lessons, and I practice 4+ hours a day usually.

It actually helps tremendously to learn the notes, and I think it's the first step because I'm starting to understand things now even though I haven't gotten into any scales except minor pentatonic.
Last edited by Rave765 at Oct 26, 2008,