#1
1.) How can you see if a song is in G or in Em when it has 1 sharp?
2.) Is a I V IV chord progression in the verse and then an ii iii vi in the bridge logic?
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#2
1: by the note it resolves on like in the melody it will stay around that note and by the chords if it uses major chords like the I IV V then it will most likely be major. also songs in mayor keys usually sound happy and minor sondgs sound sad this isthe easisest way to tell so i probably should have put it first.

2 i suppose if you wanted to write a song like that you could
Dan The Man Of the Australia FTW! Club. PM Alter-Bridge or The_Random_Hero to join. Australians Only

Gear Fund 1000/ ???

Yes his name is Dan
#3
Chances are it will start with an G if it's in G major or E if it's in E minor.

It may not, but that is often an easy way to tell.
#4
1.) How can you see if a song is in G or in Em when it has 1 sharp?


You have to look for a resolution. This can be complicated depending of how familiar or unfamiliar you are with diatonic harmony, but the best way to tell is to look for a major chord or a dominant seventh chord that is immediately followed by a major or minor chord a fifth below or a fourth above (e.g. G/G7 - C in C major, or E/E7 - Am in A minor)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Quote by Archeo Avis
You have to look for a resolution. This can be complicated depending of how familiar or unfamiliar you are with diatonic harmony, but the best way to tell is to look for a major chord or a dominant seventh chord that is immediately followed by a major or minor chord a fifth below or a fourth above (e.g. G/G7 - C in C major, or E/E7 - Am in A minor)


What if you have some deceptive cadence like IV-vi?
With that it may seem as it is in minor, even when it's not...
#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
You have to look for a resolution. This can be complicated depending of how familiar or unfamiliar you are with diatonic harmony, but the best way to tell is to look for a major chord or a dominant seventh chord that is immediately followed by a major or minor chord a fifth below or a fourth above (e.g. G/G7 - C in C major, or E/E7 - Am in A minor)
+1


It will have a natural "pull" to go to the major or minor chord.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥