#1
Hi everyone. I am just curious if you guys can provide me with some links or responces on exactly what I need to know to learn Jazz. I've been playing guitar for 3 years and sad to say I have never tried to learn music theory >_<. But now this is what I want to do. I pretty much want a head start because my plan is to enroll @ MCC(community college) for a music degree and I dont want to go in there with no knowledge at all. Any help or info is greatly appreciated! ( I was going to go to ITT TECH but said hell no! music is my life and what makes me truely happy!) So I would love to start my new career!
Last edited by Doc Smiley at Oct 25, 2008,
#2
Quote by Doc Smiley
Hi everyone. I am just curious if you guys can provide me with some links or responces on exactly what I need to know to learn Jazz. I've been playing guitar for 3 years and sad to say I have never tried to learn music theory >_<. But now this is what I want to do. I pretty much want a head start because my plan is to enroll @ MCC(community college) for a music degree and I dont want to go in there with no knowledge at all. Any help or info is greatly appreciated! ( I was going to go to ITT TECH but said hell no! music is my life and what makes me truely happy!) So I would love to start my new career!

Music is the worst career path you could take. You most likely will not have a stable income, especially if you plan to live of your band. A guy I know wants to be a session musician, well thats barely better than living of your band. Being a composer is marginally better, but still unstable. Music teacher is your best bet, but you dont have any theory under your belt.

I'm really not trying to be mean, but you should have planned to go to ITT tech. Very soon, our workplace will have a massive demand for IT technicians and engineers who specialise with modern technology. It's probably the most stable job I can think of.


I hope the above doesnt dissuade you. If you love something, does money actually mean anything?

Theory is usefull to anyone that wants to do more than just play other peoples songs. By the contemporary definition of theory (just about everything to do with music), you will need it for every job I mentioned, especially if you want to be a (professional) composer or a music teacher.

If you want to learn theory, borrow these books from your local library and read them: The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory, Crusade articles (in our coloumn section), Mark Levines Jazz book, Jazzology. This will get you a nice all rounder for theory. If you want to get better at composing read any melody writing book (I like Annie Warburtons one) and any counterpoint treatise (theres an easy one on gutenberg, but Kent Wheeler Kennans ones not bad, just a bit hard).

If you tell exactly what area of music you're planning to enter, I'll give you more information (also, I'm sort of curious).
#3
To add my two cents...

You probably shouldn't jump straight into music as a career if you don't have any alternative in the event that it doesn't work out.

Also, pick up some music theory.


Although, of course, IT isn't the most lucrative career option, especially not in the future. More and more companies are outsourcing to countries such as India where standard computer-based jobs can be carried out at much lower prices. So, yeah.

Also, Jazzology is a neat book.
#4
You have two options - find a good guitar teacher or try to learn as much as possible by yourself. The first option is obviously better, but if you can't do that then you must find:

a) a book on music theory (everything from the basics)
b) all 7th chord forms, positions and inversions from the 6th, 5th, 4th and 3rd strings (though you can work out the inversions by yourself if you know the chords)
c) a Real Book of some kind to learn some jazz standards and to get the jazz phrasing and chord changes down on your fingers.
d) some good old jazz recordings (like Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, Bill Evans, Dave Brubeck, Duke Ellington, Joe Pass, Django Reinhardt)

Oh, and learn your scales: all the modes of a major scale, pentatonic scales, major and minor blues scales. And on which chord they are used.

Well, that's basically it Jazz is a big world, but you can prepare yourself if you work hard enough. Good luck, mate ;]
Last edited by UNIe at Oct 25, 2008,
#5
Awesome guys thanks for the responces. I will check out all of the suggested material. I am a very fast learner, and I know with my dedication I can learn just about anything. Classes are Dictation and Sight Reading, Theory 1A/1B and
Performing Ensembles. If I were to go into this w/o having any knowledge in either of these courses, how would it effect me? I mean I am paying the money and time to have professors teach me everything I need to know right? So knowing little shouldn't be much of a worry? I have a friend who attends MCC for his music major and is an excellent jazz gutarist. He told me he would help me with anything so I have my teacher part covered. I don't plan on being a "rock star" or anything like that. I simply what to become a better musician/guitar player and understand my passion in life. A studio musician would be excellent, even a guitar teacher or anything that envoles music, I would be happy. It's funny because everyone I talk to besides my friend thinks the same way you feel demonofthenight.
Last edited by Doc Smiley at Oct 25, 2008,
#6
I mean I am paying the money and time to have professors teach me everything I need to know right?


That's not how University works. The professors are only there to simplify the material and help you if you need it. The responsibility for learning the material is yours. Educating yourself before hand will only help you.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
I don't plan on being a "rock star" or anything like that. I simply what to become a better musician/guitar player and understand my passion in life. A studio musician would be excellent, even a guitar teacher or anything that envoles music, I would be happy. It's funny because everyone I talk to besides my friend thinks the same way you feel demonofthenight.
#8
Yes, you should be worried.

Education is any subject at degree level usually assumes you have some prior knowledge at a more basic level - you wouldn't do a French or physics degree if you had never studied french at school, it's the same with music...learning to play the guitar doesn't necessarily give you any experience of music itself.

I suggest you find out what the minimum requirements of the course are and what they're expecting you to already know. If you've never studied theory then, quite frankly, you're probably screwed. You said it's a jazz course, as opposed to a general music course and jazz is one of the most complex genres around requiring you to have a solid understanding of basic theory before you've got a chance of understanding it....I reckon you've got a good couple of years studying to go before you'll be ready. They won't spoon feed you everything you need to know from the beginning, rather they'll be building on what you should already know. Having teachers or knowledgeable friends only helps so much - all they can do is provide you with information, you still need to assimilate and understand it yourself, you won't be able to go into this course cold.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
Last edited by steven seagull at Oct 25, 2008,
#9
I'm sorry let me clear that up. It's not a jazz course. It's a basic music theory course(pitch, rhythm, melody, tonality, harmony, and scale systems)Dictation+sight reading(This course will help you develop skills in aural perception and analysis and in music reading and sight singing) . I just love jazz and eventually want to perform once I have taken the steps and procedures. Haha cool just found that the school even offers this ( MUS 110 - Fundamentals of Music is also offered as a remedial solution for those entering students with little or no training in Music Theory.)
Last edited by Doc Smiley at Oct 25, 2008,
#10
It's funny because everyone I talk to besides my friend thinks the same way you feel demonofthenight.
Read my third paragraph, I want you to become a professional musician. Just be prepared for the worst.

And did you ever think that the reason why me and everyone else you know came to the same conclusion was because its a logical conclusion? It's nice to say, hey I'm going to do X lucrative job for a career, but when your living away from your parents it doesnt work like that.

Could you live on canned food in a 2 room apartment with out your parents buying you video games and guitars? In reality, very few people enjoy living like that.

It's one thing people being naive. It's another people being ungratefull .
#11
Buying fresh, simple materials and actually learning to cook for yourself is cheaper, tastier and healthier than canned food. I don't mind living small and buying my clothing at village des valeurs (with a decent eye you can find some very good stuff). I know that about myself and accepted it when I chose the path I did. Just make sure you're prepared for the reality of what you're getting in to.

Anyway, Jazz 101, at least to begin, is to build a collection. Everyone has their own tastes, but I recommend beginning with Miles' first quintet. All the theory in the world will not make you sound remotely jazzy if you don't have the sound in your head. Tap along, sing along, try to play along, whatever.