#1
If your pick-up is closer to your strings you would get a little more output right? Would it change your tone at all?
#2
Quote by Final !mpact
If your pick-up is closer to your strings you would get a little more output right? Would it change your tone at all?

Yes
And if it's too close it'll sound muddy
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#3
Quote by tsukoyomimoon
Yes
And if it's too close it'll sound muddy


So raising it on a thin sounding pickup will help it sound a bit thicker? Lowering it on a muddy sounding pickup will reduce some of that bass?
#4
Quote by Final !mpact
So raising it on a thin sounding pickup will help it sound a bit thicker? Lowering it on a muddy sounding pickup will reduce some of that bass?

Don't know about it sounding thicker, but lowering the height does remove the muddiness
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#5
Why don't you just experiment and see what pickup height you like best?
Gear:
- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

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#6
It doesn't get 'thicker', it gets 'muddier'. They're two different things.

Thickness is how strong the middle frequencies come through compared to the treble and bass frequencies. A 'thick' tone has lots of mids.
Muddiness is how defined the tone is. For example, on a really muddy ton, you could play a G5 powerchord and it'd sound like one single droning sound, but if it was a clearer tone then you'd be able to tell it was two strings together. It also effects dynamic responsiveness, which means the difference between hitting the string hard or soft, the difference between wide vibrato and small vibrato, etc etc.


Basically, if you raise the pickup higher, you'll get strong bass and mid response compared to the treble response. Overall this muddies up the tone, you lose definition and responsiveness. The payoff is the pickups will provide much higher output, which is useful if you're already cranking a tube amp as hard as it can go and you want to push it even more.

If pickups are lower, you get a much clearer and more responsive tone, but the output goes down too. This isn't a problem though if you're not cranking a tube amp fully, since when you're not fully cranking it, output becomes irrelevant anyway.
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