#1
I've been playing for about 7 weeks. For every 10 hours I practice only 1 is with a pick. I've been leaning towards fingerstyle. It's comfortable and I love the way it sounds. However, on strum patterns i'm hesitant to use a pick. I feel like I have much more control just sliding my first finger along the strings and I love the sound I get. I'm growing my right hand fingernails out so I can get a better sound when I fingerpick.

I was at GC buying a new acoustic and the salesman handed me a pick and I said, "no thanks, I actually haven't really used a pick" and he replied, "that's a good thing". I didn't have him elaborate on that so maybe someone could shed some light on the subject.

I feel ignorant for not using a pick but it's obvious to me why I prefer not to use one - it's flat out easier.
#2
there's definite benifits to learning to play with your fingers, but i've found that i don't like the tone i get when i use my thumb. but you'll probably fix that with longer nails
Quote by Strato-Massacre
yeah you shouldnt have told the pit to rape your mom.

Quote by Kensai
It's not sexist, girls are just too stupid and weak to hold up doors and stuff for themselves.
#3
if you keep practising you can do much mroe with your fingers than with a pick, just know that if you eveer want to start using a pick your gonna have t cut those nails.
Quote by boreamor
Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


People
should
smile
more



crit4crit on 'acoustic 1 (with piano)' here



Rate my playing skills please.
#4
There are benefits and downsides to both approaches.

It all comes down to style and preference basically. For example, you will find it difficult to play some folkish patters with a pick, not to talk about some classical stuff. On the other hand you'll probably have a hard time doing other stuff if you aren't used to using a pick.

Practise what you find most comfortable, then if you realize that you want to try the other, do it.
The very existence of flamethrowers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, "You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done.

-George Carlin
#5
yeah, I don't especially use a pick either. I've noticed that the tone appeals to me more. It's really just a matter of personal preference, as Petterblo says.
#6
i'd recommend trying to be proficient in both fingerpicking and using a pick. I feel the same way as i prefer to fingerpick, but I try to practice with a pick just as much so I can be decent in different situations. It depends a lot on your style of music. If you're going to be playing classical guitar the rest of your life then of course it doesn't matter as much. But if you ever want to do certain things and if you also want to play the electric guitar then it would be good to play well using a pick.
#7
Quote by Rockoz
i'd recommend trying to be proficient in both fingerpicking and using a pick. I feel the same way as i prefer to fingerpick, but I try to practice with a pick just as much so I can be decent in different situations. It depends a lot on your style of music. If you're going to be playing classical guitar the rest of your life then of course it doesn't matter as much. But if you ever want to do certain things and if you also want to play the electric guitar then it would be good to play well using a pick.


Thanks for all the quick replies. I love this board! I'm sorry I didn't mention I also play an electric guitar. I would say every 10 hours of practice involves only 1-2 hours of electric. I'm OK with that because I feel the acoustic is helping me build strength, dexterity, and calluses quicker than an electric can. If I'm wrong, please feel free say so. I am not knocking the electric because I love that instrument and I can't wait to play some sick solos and *praying* Cliffs of Dover someday. I don't think Cliffs of Dover would sound quite right on an acoustic. So, I will probably kick up the pick playing to say 3 or 4 of every 10 hours of practice. Once I decide what I am really passionate about then I could always practice that more.
#8
Being good at both has a lot of benefits. Learning both will help you with coordination in general. I couldn't get used to using a pick at first, but now, I don't think I could live without one(probably because I'm mainly a strummer + acoustic guitar player). Anyway, you won't always have a pick around with you either, so it's good to learn to play with your fingers just in case as well.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#9
Yeah, at first I played with my fingers but switched to pick.

Do whatever is comfortable for you. But you're going to have a hard time playing quick-power chords with fingers.
#10
Mark Knopfler doesn't use a pick.

I like using a pick. IMO the tone is much nicer and after a week of practice or so it's just as easy. But it's up to you.
Thomas hopes to not have offended anyone with this post. No responsibility whatsoever is taken for any spelling or grammar mistakes, should there be any.

last.fm
#11
How do you folks tend to strum finger style? Do you use a certain finger or combination of fingers. I have been toying with finger style but have difficulty strumming. any tips would be greatly appreciated.
#12
personally i find a pick easier to use and when it comes to strumming anything other then power chords i just use my 3 fingers that and my picking fingers, but my dad plays the guitar finger style and he cant use a pick properly he can play fast riffs with his fingers though which ive tried but i find it really hard
Wanna know what gear i have? check my profile
Black Beauty Owners Group
Muddy Waters invented electricity

Paul Kossoff = Genius
#13
I prefer using pick because it provides more power in my strumming. It's more of your strumming style and music genre.
“The guy said NBA players are one in a million, ... I said, 'Man, look, I'm going to be that one in a million.'”
Kobe Bryant
#14
I started doing the same things. Using picks was just hard for me to get used to. But then, picking suddenly became easier than finger-picking.
A lot of it depends on the style. Fingerpicking acoustic can't have a pick, whereas metal and whatnot needs one (Or extremely fast fingers).
Also picks add a sharper tone, whereas fingers make it warmer.
will someone carry me across ten thousand miles under the silence
#16
Quote by Capt.gumby
How do you folks tend to strum finger style? Do you use a certain finger or combination of fingers. I have been toying with finger style but have difficulty strumming. any tips would be greatly appreciated.

I'll use my index fingernail to strum down and my thumb's nail when strumming up. You could also take a look at this, it gives you the jist of rasqueado strumming.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8d1fbRBvkU
#17
Quote by Lt.DanHasLegs
there's definite benifits to learning to play with your fingers, but i've found that i don't like the tone i get when i use my thumb. but you'll probably fix that with longer nails


your not really a bass player unless u play with your fingers
if you want to play with a pick buy a guitar
#18
It's all preference. However, I might suggest dedicating more of your practice time to getting used to a pick.

I initally started out playing strictly fingerstyle. Picks felt ackward and uncomfortable, however I was able to fly once I put it down. Now that I've played for a while and gotten used to it, I wish I had done it sooner! Playing with a pick opens up a whole new spectrum of techniques and sounds that are extremely difficult with fingers alone. Now I can do both, and I find uses for both. Nothing impresses people like being able to play a hard heavy metal run with pinches and lots of tremolo picking, then putting the pick down and laying out some sweet fingerstyle stuff with popping, wild arpeggios, and classical style fingerpicking diminished chords with accompanying bass notes, almost like having two guitars play at once! It gives you an extremely wide range of sound to be able to do both, and I now practice both dilligantly. Don't just give up because it's tough!

At the end of the day it's all preference and you're the one who gets to decide how you play, but make sure you're giving both a fair shake!
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#19
See Wes Montgomery.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
Quote by sam b
Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#20
I use a pick, but I'm working towards being good with both my fingers and a pick. I didn't use a pick myself for a couple of months too. I find it much easier to alternate pick with them though.


I wouldn't be afraid of using a pick, since both ways have advantages
#21
Quote by Garou1911
It's all preference. However, I might suggest dedicating more of your practice time to getting used to a pick.

I initally started out playing strictly fingerstyle. Picks felt ackward and uncomfortable, however I was able to fly once I put it down. Now that I've played for a while and gotten used to it, I wish I had done it sooner! Playing with a pick opens up a whole new spectrum of techniques and sounds that are extremely difficult with fingers alone. Now I can do both, and I find uses for both. Nothing impresses people like being able to play a hard heavy metal run with pinches and lots of tremolo picking, then putting the pick down and laying out some sweet fingerstyle stuff with popping, wild arpeggios, and classical style fingerpicking diminished chords with accompanying bass notes, almost like having two guitars play at once! It gives you an extremely wide range of sound to be able to do both, and I now practice both dilligantly. Don't just give up because it's tough!

At the end of the day it's all preference and you're the one who gets to decide how you play, but make sure you're giving both a fair shake!


Awesome post!! And you're totally right, I should not give up because it's not as easy. Hell, I wanted to give up on day one because i couldn't tune my damn guitar or strum an A chord without buzz central! I'll put more time into using a pick. Thanks for the help.
#23
Well if you like cliffs of dover. Eric Johnson is proficient at both picking and finger picking in various different techniques. It's always good to be able to use both, especially at the same time.
^Note: Probably sarcastic
Gear
Schecter Blackjack C1-FR
Few Agile 8-strings
Ormsby Hypemachine 2014 otw!!

Carvin X-100B
axe-fx II

W.A musicians FTW
Quote by crisisinheaven
Deep*Kick. You have destroyed every concept of life I've ever had.
#24
well ive played bass for so long i hate fingerpicking on electric....or acoustic, sometimes i feel like i totally forget, and sometimes i do, till i pickup my bass agin
lol
well thats y if you rle wana try it, try picking with ur thumb for bass note strength.... trust me, it helps
but plz dont make it a habbit :/
#25
fingers are good when there's no pick lying around
It gets difficult to hit exactly the right strings when strumming fast
#27
Quote by krazybartender
Awesome post!! And you're totally right, I should not give up because it's not as easy. Hell, I wanted to give up on day one because i couldn't tune my damn guitar or strum an A chord without buzz central! I'll put more time into using a pick. Thanks for the help.

Bingo. If it was easy, everyone would do it
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#29
^^^ This.

I was playing a song tonight and dropped my pick, so I finished the song without a pick. I've never had to do that before, and I felt like I had just won a contest of some sort.
You're*
#30
Thanks for all the replies ---

Just an update - i've been using a pick for the last few days and my strumming has improved dramatically. Like everything else with guitar, it just takes practice.
#31
it's great to know how to play with your fingers only, however, you should learn at least the basics of pick technique, because it's quite useful sometimes
Quote by Moggan13
Serjem is like a Bishops testicals: Swollen
ಠ_ಠ
IIIIfb * KARKOLI * ytIIII(mostly rock... a little funky, a little hard just the way you want it )
#32
Yeah, when I first picked up the guitar I was partial to finger picking, especially with my thumb, but had to force myself to practice using a pick, but after a few days of using strictly pick techniques, I picked it up and all was well, but I still finger pick from time to time.
#33
I practice both, finger picking and just playing with a pick. I have short nails though, mind.