#1
i was just wondering what the differences between having a straight or having an angled 412 cab is tone wise. I have a 6505 into a straight cab and was curious about how a angled cab would affect tone.
#2
it doesnt, angled cabs are angled cos they go on top so its a lower centre of gravity
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#3
There might be a bit of difference when standing up, because speakers will sound a little different when they are pointing towards your ears (top 2).
but for recording or whatnot, it wont sound any different....
#4
Quote by prison sex
it doesnt, angled cabs are angled cos they go on top so its a lower centre of gravity


nonsense. the angled cab was invented because manufacturers realised that pointing all the sound at the guitarists legs was useless; no-one has their ears down there! The purpose of angling the top 2 speakers was to allow the guitarist to hear his own amp without the need for additional monitors. it also helps to spread the sound out and make it sound "fuller"
Quote by Dave_Mc
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#5
Quote by AndyPandy
nonsense. the angled cab was invented because manufacturers realised that pointing all the sound at the guitarists legs was useless; no-one has their ears down there! The purpose of angling the top 2 speakers was to allow the guitarist to hear his own amp without the need for additional monitors. it also helps to spread the sound out and make it sound "fuller"



Wrong. The angled cabs speakers are pointing in the exact same direction as the straight cabs, they arent vented up or anything! Angled cabs were made so in full-stack situations, the top cab would be angled to compliment the head.

Sound wise, straight cabs will sound fuller. The angled cabs deduct from the fullness, though not by much, straight is preferred in professional situations. I think Mike Soldano or some other famous amp maker gave a low down on this but i dont remember who it was.
#6
Quote by injected
Wrong. The angled cabs speakers are pointing in the exact same direction as the straight cabs, they arent vented up or anything! Angled cabs were made so in full-stack situations, the top cab would be angled to compliment the head.

Sound wise, straight cabs will sound fuller. The angled cabs deduct from the fullness, though not by much, straight is preferred in professional situations. I think Mike Soldano or some other famous amp maker gave a low down on this but i dont remember who it was.



Are you trying to say that the top 2 speakers in a slant are pointed at the exact same angle as the top 2 speakers in a straight...????

Also, straight cabs only sound fuller because less high frequencies are reaching your ears depending on where you are standing from the front of the cab. I challenge anyone to blind test a straight vs slant standing from the side or behind, or at least not directly in front of the amp.
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#7
Straight cabs definitely have tighter bass response as they are more directional. I havent seen a straight cab with the top speakers angled, and I've owned several cabs
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#9
My 1960B has it's speakers angled upwards.

Jim Marshall said that he made the 1960a slant cab for nothing other than aesthetics. Straight cabs are almost always preferred tonewise
#10
Quote by Bloodshed
Straight cabs definitely have tighter bass response as they are more directional. I havent seen a straight cab with the top speakers angled, and I've owned several cabs



Personally, I don't see it as the cab/speakers themselves actually generating a tighter bass response. I feel people perceive it differently based on the relationship b/w the angle of the speakers relative to our ears, thus having an effect on the frequencies reaching/not reaching us. IMO there is no difference from many angles.

I may be wrong...
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#11
^ this is true...and honestly, when miced up it makes zero difference.
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#12
mic'd up I did not think it made any difference, I can see how and angled cab could make a difference up close, but the advantage going to the straight with very directional sound and some tighter response due to a little more cabinet volume
#13
Quote by hardrckr120
mic'd up I did not think it made any difference, I can see how and angled cab could make a difference up close, but the advantage going to the straight with very directional sound and some tighter response due to a little more cabinet volume


pretty sure that is a misconception...where'd you hear that?
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#14
Quote by hardrckr120
mic'd up I did not think it made any difference, I can see how and angled cab could make a difference up close, but the advantage going to the straight with very directional sound and some tighter response due to a little more cabinet volume


This is debatable. The amount of cabinet size lacking in an angled cab is negligible, and few cabs (and no Marshall ones) are designed with ports behind the speaker to mitigate where the energy from the speaker "pushing back" before it "pushes forward", when it actually puts out the sound of the guitar, dissipates to.

What this means is that the energy created and put inside the cab is not dissipated with insulation or porting, because there's not enough room inside the cab to do that with 4 12 inch speakers. The cab is too "small" in acoustic terms. Also, a guitar speaker (as opposed to a stereo speaker) is designed with this in mind. It's meant to work well in a confined space like that, so the amount of "loss" you might find in response and bass should be minor at best, and realistically, virtually nonexistent, considering the frequency range of a guitar and what the cab/speaker is thereby designed to put out.

Another way to look at this is that Marshall does not put speakers in the top of an angled cab that are different from the ones in the bottom--they are all the same make and model, and have the same specs. I know of no company that voices a slant cab in such a manner. If making a slant cab caused a drop in frequency range somehow, I'm sure they would voice the top and bottom speakers a bit differently to overcome that, or push for everyone buying half-stacks to get a bottom before a top. (That obviously is not happening.)

The obvious reality is, like stated, that Jim Marshall slanted the cab to make it look "complete" as the top of a stack, and the angle of the speakers aimed up has a different "sweet spot", so your ears think you are losing bass when it's just because the sound is going at your head, not your back. You can try this for yourself--stand a few feet off axis of any cab and play a few notes, then play them again standing in front of them. You should note a big difference in the amount of bass in the tone.
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#15
I Like straight cabs. You dont have 100 watts being thrown into your face.
It also seems that a slant cab on top of a straight cab would create a better
range of sound.
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#18
Depending on the brand, angled vs. straight can mean different things as some makers have angled speaker baffles in straight cabs, but without going into all the different kinds, a standard scenario is that an angled cab has the top two speakers angled upward and a straight cab has all the speakers pointing straight forward (a straight cab also has a larger volume and slightly deeper bass). An angled cab on floor level will point the speakers towards a guitarists ears, and this can be bad for those that wish to maintain their hearing, but also gives the guitarist a better idea of what is actually coming out of the speaker. An angled cab also disperses sound differently and gives a wider soundstage--this will also change how the sound reacts in a room and could alter certain cancellations and such in a room that is not ideal for proper sound production (particularly in a mic'd recording situation).
#19
Quote by kaiser_bill
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#22
Jim Marshall came up with the design for the first angled 4 X 12. The reason was so that the head would look better sitting on top of it.

Tonaly the angled cab will sound different to the guitarist but not when miced up.
Here's why;
Treble frequencies tend to emit from a speaker straight out from the cone whereas bassy frequencies tend to disperse.
For a guitarist standing in front of the 4 X 12 cab he will tend to get the trable freqs from the top two speakers and more bass from the bottom two. It also gives a good representation of what the crowd will hear as, being lower down, they will get the trebs from the bottom two speakers and bass from the top two.
A straight 4 X 12 will tend to sound bassy to the guitarist while making the audiences ears bleed with trebs coming from each of the four speakers at them.
This is also why placing a mike slightly off-centre of the cone will produce a warmer tone.
#23
Quote by kaiser_bill
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this thread is actually very helpful to me, I'm learning quite a bit from reading it.

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#24
this is actually quite interesting. i've been wondering why there are different variants of cabs. btw, what is porting and how does that apply to cabs?
#25
Ye this is helping out a lot, funny that it got reported given that this isn't the typical pick one scenario. Appreciate the input everyone
#26
Quote by RG_FANMAN
this is actually quite interesting. i've been wondering why there are different variants of cabs. btw, what is porting and how does that apply to cabs?


Porting at its most basic is how a cabinet/speaker enclosure is designed for the energy a speaker creates to dissipate into. A speaker actually works by going backwards BEFORE it goes forward to produce sound. In this way, it creates energy, which has to go somewhere, or there will be problems with frequency response and so on....basically making what comes out sound bad, because the sound actually being produced fights with waves created before it.

There are a lot of ways to do this--one would be old Fender cabs, which had open backs, which was a simple but effective way of porting. The speakers would move too far back and create unwanted overtones, but the open back allows the energy to leave the cabinet. Marshall cabs feature speakers which only need to push back slightly in order to create sound, so they are closed backed. Other cab makers may put in insulation or even strange-looking cones or other shapes in odd places, that move the sound out or anticipate the energy going away from the speaker, etc.

Porting can actually be extremely complex and mathematical, with intense sine calculations, preferences, debate, etc. But you should consider that what you think is a great cab may be because of these considerations, as much as the speakers in it. I'm partly convinced the classic "Marshall sound" has a lot to do with how the cab and speakers are put together, as much as the speaker type and amp head itself.

BTW, I don't know why this thread got reported. God forbid we try to discuss how our tones are actually made, rather than responding to "which amp do I buy?" threads.
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#27
oh, okay. the term confused me before I know what it was. thanks.

so quick question; right now I got a Mesa Recto 2x12. In the future, if/when I upgrade to a 4x12, i'm looking at Mesa Recto cabs, so would a straight be better for a band situation with 2 guitarists, bassist, drummer, and possibly (hopefully) a keyboardist, or would a slant cab produce a better sound to cut through the mix?

additionally, concerning Marshall 1960 cabs, which letter is slanted? A or B? When I first got interested in the DC series from Mesa, I played a DC-3 head through a slant JCM800 cab and I absolutely crave that sound now, so I'm interested in pursuing a cab similar to that one since it got sold before I could get it.
#28
Quote by RG_FANMAN
oh, okay. the term confused me before I know what it was. thanks.

so quick question; right now I got a Mesa Recto 2x12. In the future, if/when I upgrade to a 4x12, i'm looking at Mesa Recto cabs, so would a straight be better for a band situation with 2 guitarists, bassist, drummer, and possibly (hopefully) a keyboardist, or would a slant cab produce a better sound to cut through the mix?

additionally, concerning Marshall 1960 cabs, which letter is slanted? A or B? When I first got interested in the DC series from Mesa, I played a DC-3 head through a slant JCM800 cab and I absolutely crave that sound now, so I'm interested in pursuing a cab similar to that one since it got sold before I could get it.


For that kind of band situation, a slant cab would be a bit better for you to hear in the onstage/practice mix. Through a PA, it won't matter either way though.

The truth is, though, that two guitars and a keyboard will fight it out for frequency range in a band, and no one will ever win. Keyboards often sub out for bass or guitars missing in small jazz combos--they take up so much "space" that they can cover up the missing instruments. It gets worse in rock--I've met plenty of players who hate playing with keyboards because it sucks up their tone in the mix. But if you can get it to work, it will probably sound fantastic.

As for cabs.....A is a slant or top, B is a straight (or bottom).
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#29
i don't plan on using keyboards as something heavy in a band situation; more like an extra layer of earcandy (if that doesn't sound fruity); like how bands like Underoath and Opeth have keyboards that play an important, although subtle, role in the sound.

And for the cab situation, there's about a 50/50 percent chance of PAs at venues i'd play, so would the slant work better for me hearing it, along with the audience, or would the straight be better?
#30
Quote by danyellenik
this thread is actually very helpful to me, I'm learning quite a bit from reading it.

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