#2
Can you read musical notation?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
i bought hal leonard's jazz guitar (by jeff schroedl) ... it didn't necessarily have rave reviews but it really has some useful information and a shitload of chords and tracks to play along with
#5
Quote by ohhey9040
Yeah, I'm currently taking AP Music Theory and I'm understanding it pretty well, but I want to expand on my current knowledge and learn how it applies to jazz.


In that case, I'm quite fond of Mark Levine's The Jazz Theory Book.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
Quote by ohhey9040
Yeah, I'm currently taking AP Music Theory and I'm understanding it pretty well, but I want to expand on my current knowledge and learn how it applies to jazz.

O.o
so am i, senior in highschool, just was accepted as a guitarist for a jazz ensemble.

i dont know of any books but if anyone else does id greatly appreciate it as well.
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Quote by freedoms_stain
I can't imagine anything worse than shagging to Mark Knopfler.

Maybe shagging Mark Knopfler, but that's about it.
#8
theres a cool book on a million chord voicings and a few other nuances called Chord Chemistry which is by Ted Greene.
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
In that case, I'm quite fond of Mark Levine's The Jazz Theory Book.

I second that. It's an excellent book.
#10
Quote by Zanon
theres a cool book on a million chord voicings and a few other nuances called Chord Chemistry which is by Ted Greene.


this is a book that is not for beginners (i studies with ted..which made understanding the book easier) a basic understanding of theory will help working with this book

its not really a theory book ... but more of an expanded chord reference...many of the chords are "going to be used just once" in a particular progression...the chord played by itself .. well...it sounds "crummy" ... as ted points out in the beginning of the book

he does say the study of traditional classical harmony and jazz theory/harmony will help understand how he came to develop many to the chords and progressions he presents in the book

play well

wolf
#11
Just a slight bump, you may have already found yourself a book by now but I just got Burt Ligons Jazz resource Book (just the first part for now) and it is a wonderful book. I though I was progressing ok with my theory and then Ligon summed up everything I had taught myself in the first few pages. Looking forward to working through the rest of the book. It is advisable to know some basic theory before picking up the book, and to be able to read standard music notation. I guarentee if your interested in theory though you will have a good time with this book.