#1
Does this work? how do you make chords that will sound good for the minor scales. When I'm using the major scale I just use chord progressions with the triads, is this the same with minor?
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#4
Yeah, except if ya, for example, use a major progession of Amaj, Dmaj, Amaj, and Emaj. (Takin the root, the 4th, and the 5th and addin the right notes.) Well, for a minor scale, you'd take any of the notes that were major in a major scale and turn em minor. So, that major progression above would become Amin, Dmin, Amin, and Emin.

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#5
Triads are constructed the same way as they are in a major key.

Minor harmony is more complex than major harmony, and the result is that the melody must be treated with care over the various alterations that can be made to the scale when constructing chord progressions. The most obvious example is the V chord in a minor key. In Western tonal harmony, dominant chords are major. This means that even though the chord build off of the dominant should technical be major, it is often (very nearly always) replaced with either V chord or a V7 chord. This is accomplished by raising the seventh degree, but that creates an augmented second interval in the scale which is considered melodically dissonant. The result is that both the seventh and the sixth are treated differently depending on whether one is descending towards the dominant, or ascending towards the tonic.

In the former case, both the sixth and seventh scale degrees are lowered. In the latter, both are raised in order to better lead into the tonic.

Well, for a minor scale, you'd take any of the notes that were major in a major scale and turn em minor.


This is wrong. Minor harmony makes use of both major and minor triads (less often, diminished).
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Last edited by Archeo Avis at Oct 25, 2008,
#6
Also, replacing the v chord in a minor key (Em in your case) with a V chord (E major) is pretty common as it gives a stronger resolution back to the i chord (Am).

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#7
okay, so you can't take the 3rd interval of each scale and keep adding it to it for the minor scale and make your minor triads?
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#8
yeah, in a minor key, atleast in classical music they have a major V chord because it has a stronger harmonic resolution, hence the harmonic minor scale. Melodic Minor has a major IV chord too.