#1
I've this issue with scales, you see:

I find it rather easy to remember which notes go under a particular scale, right now, however, I can only play one scale: Minor Pentatonic in E, over the entire fingerboard.

I've actually mastered this scale to a rather high degree, however what I'm wondering is:

Do you guys have any tricks for remembering all the different scales? I'm thinking about, for instance, when I want to start learning Minor Pentatonic in A, then I may start forgetting about the Minor Pentatonic in E, should it just be a memory issue? And do I just need time to let it stick to my head?

Because I've also thought about just getting back to the root of the scale: Basically understanding where each note is on the guitar, and then out from that, starting to get an image of how each scale moves up and down (e.g. whole step, whole step, 1½ step), and improvise through that.

Any hints on how to remember a particular scale in the vast amount of different keys?
#2
What I do is, when transposing a scale, start with the basic first shape, and play a solo, slowing adding more notes (by working out where to go next, relative from the note you're on).

So, just play and play.
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#3
Quote by Simsimius
What I do is, when transposing a scale, start with the basic first shape, and play a solo, slowing adding more notes (by working out where to go next, relative from the note you're on).

So, just play and play.


By "shape" do you mean the positions? Because I find that doesn't work for me, since I learn the scales better by moving along the fretboard rather than in a small restricted square.

Anyway I think I've already found a way: Basically, learn the pattern of the scale (e.g. step, step, 1½ step, step, 1½ step), and then one can of course figure out which notes correspond to a certain scale by using this pattern on a particular note.

And then basically just get really savvy at knowing where all the notes are on the fretboard, I think this would be way better.

However I'm still open to ideas.
#4
well for the two scales you listed, amin pentatonic is just all the notes of emin pentatonic moved up five frets. so it really shouldnt be that hard to learn.

as for learning an entirely new scale(not pentatonic) you should probably stay with one position, learn it really well and then start adding more and more notes.
#5
Quote by Kinky Bunny
By "shape" do you mean the positions? Because I find that doesn't work for me, since I learn the scales better by moving along the fretboard rather than in a small restricted square.

Anyway I think I've already found a way: Basically, learn the pattern of the scale (e.g. step, step, 1½ step, step, 1½ step), and then one can of course figure out which notes correspond to a certain scale by using this pattern on a particular note.

And then basically just get really savvy at knowing where all the notes are on the fretboard, I think this would be way better.

However I'm still open to ideas.


That's not what I mean. I can't play positions - they do restrict playability

What I'm saying is, start with the first shape, so you are familar with a "base" area, or if you want, just start with a note.
And then slowly add extra notes, so you slowly find all the notes in that key, and keep playing them until they are in your memory.
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You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#6
I kinda just improvise with other notes that fit in, and find the patterns from there. I'm at about the same place as you are( except the scale I know best is G Minor ). My best advice would be just to mess around until you can find your own ways of using the patterns all around the neck.

Also, if your not lazy, just learn the notes on the neck. Memorizing all the notes with definately help you improvise, its just hard and takes a long time to do.
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#7
Well if you learn the notes on the fretboard, you can basically learn the scale in all keys by moving to different locations on the fretboard. It helps to know the patterns but the notes are more important.
#8
Quote by Rave765
Well if you learn the notes on the fretboard, you can basically learn the scale in all keys by moving to different locations on the fretboard. It helps to know the patterns but the notes are more important.

+1

Learn the notes on the fretboard
Learn the pattern of intervals of a scale.
Realise that most of those "different" patterns you've been trying to learn are in fact exactly the same thing, just moved around the fretboard.

If you haven't even figured that out that most basic piece of information yet then you're a long way off "mastering" a scale...
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#9
Any respectable guitar teacher will tell you that's a terrible way to learn to play the scales. You should be able to play ALL of the scales easily within the same six fret radius.

Learn the patterns that each scale follows (TTSTTTS for major scale, for example), learn the fretboard practice the hell out of them.
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#10
Just move those positions up and down the fretboard. You got it. All I memorized for pentatonics was A. I just move it up 2 frets for b, 5 for d, etc.
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#11
Quote by steven seagull
+1

Learn the notes on the fretboard
Learn the pattern of intervals of a scale.
Realise that most of those "different" patterns you've been trying to learn are in fact exactly the same thing, just moved around the fretboard.

If you haven't even figured that out that most basic piece of information yet then you're a long way off "mastering" a scale...


Fact of matter is: Of course I do know the notes on the guitar, if I slowly think myself to it, however

What I'd like is to basically have such a high memory of the notes on the fretboard that I'd even be able to improvise quickly by knowing which notes correspond to a certain scale. (and is this achievable at all?)

It sounds like you recommend this, but just to be sure, is this what you recommend?

Somehow it actually does seem rather much like the easy way out to just remember the positions and then realize that any scale in a different tone is just switching the positions.
#12
Easiest thing to do is learn the basics of music theory (ie, what intervals are in which scale) and then practice enough to either hear what notes fit, or so you can think in terms of intervals. The hardest bit is thinking in terms of moving strings. If you are on a certain note, say a C in an A minor pentatonic, then you have a full tone interval. In terms of notes, your next note is D, but in terms of strings, this can be accomplished by either a jump across to the right of 2 frets, or a jump upwards of a string and back of 3 frets. Except for a G to B string jump, then it'd be 2 frets backwards.

Now comes the tricky part. If you learn your fretboard, then you'll evetually think in terms of 'OK the not I want is there, or there, or there' giving you options. Then even more difficult is, at speed, learning to keep track of where you are in a scale so you know which interval comes next. You can confine yourself to one or two shapes, and that is easy and effective, but for ultimate freedom you realy want to know your fretboard intuitively. A particularly good one to practice with is harmonic minor because it has a range of different intervals and means you need to know where you are in the scale.

And have fun.