#1
OK maybe some aspects of this have been discussed in other threads,but nevertheless I need some answers...I play an Ibanez RG 321 thro a Korg ax 3000g.My sound setting sound killer for rhythm work,but when I start on leads ( typically the higher stringss ) I have a lot of difficulty in controlling unwanted noise from the stings Im not actually hitting.Now in most of the articles I saw here,people have suggested muting,but will muting not kill the notes.Why would you kill notes prematurely in a solo -its supposed to ring along for ever.What could the potential problem be ? Too much gain ? My bridge Pup too close to the strings ? If muting is the answer,can someone elaborate how its done ? Im sure its not the same palm mute technique as used for rhythm work.Also its damn difficult to play - say rapid notes on the 1st string and damp the 2nd and 3rd at the same time...
#2
When muting is discussed, it is in application to the strings that you are not playing, not the strings that you are playing.

In order to help alleviate the nuisance of unwanted string noise, lightly rest the palm of your picking hand on the strings that are "above" the string(s) your playing (that is, physically above, but lower in pitch; the bass strings, for example). As for the fretting hand, use your fingers that you aren't currently fretting, and even the one that you are fretting, to lay lightly over those strings that are "below" the string(s) you are playing (that is, physically below, but higher in pitch; the high-E and B strings, for example).

It's not necessarily an immediate technique you'll perfect, but practice obviously helps.

To be sure that you are doing everything right, fret a note, mute the other strings as I have suggested, and then purposefully play extra strings. If you have muted them correctly they won't be heard.
Last edited by TheHeartbreaker at Oct 26, 2008,
#3
Check out Freepower's lesson on muting (see the links in his sig). That pretty much nails it.
But the very short version is that you use your fretting hand to mute the strings which are higher than the one your playing, and your picking hand to mute the lower strings. That and practicing slow to develop accuracy in your movements so that your fingers go exactly where you need them to go.
#4
whoa...so muting it is eh ? Guess,i'll have to sweat it out over that one...thanx dudes.
#7
i personally suggest turning the gain down, you don't normally need much distortion/gain to get a heavy crunchy sound anyways.
#8
Turning the gain down will only leave you distortion-less and it will diminish your sustain by a whole lot. If you like the way it sounds, then go for it, but if you are not careful you will end up killing your solo because of compromising. I think that you are better off to just keep the strings muted that you are not playing. It takes a good bit of practicing, but you will get good at it in time. It will feel awkward at first because you have to change the way that you are used to picking. Try taking any solo (ex. crazy train) and slowing down a lot and playing each note so that it can be clearly heard. Now gradually increase in speed over time and you will master it. Remember, practice does not make perfect, but rather perfect practice makes perfect. Hope I helped.
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#11
Yeah, okay, lowering the gain might help a little. I guess it depends on how dirty you like it. You might try using the neck pickup if you do not already. It cleans us the picture by a lot without really diminishing the gain, but by changing the tone.
My Gear

Gibson Les Paul Custom Classic
Fender American Stratocaster
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Ariana Acoustic Guitar
Garcia No. 3 Spanish Guitar
Crate Retro-FX 30 watt
Crate 350 watt Stack
Crate GT3500 250 watt Amp head
#12
Concerning turning the gain down; if you're just practicing exercises or just trying to learn a song, I think you should leave the gain up. I think you should leave the gain up because it will really help your technique. If you can play clean with the gain low, but unclean with the gain up, than by just turning the gain down I think it just masks an underlying technique problem. That's just my opinion though, and you should definitely take my opinion with a grain of salt.
Last edited by Unledded at Oct 27, 2008,