#1
Hey guys,
Well I am saving up for a really nice acoustic (one I will probably have with me for years and years and years to come) and I was thinking about one with a cutaway for easier access to the higher frets, but then I realized that a chunk taken out of the guitar would change the tone. So what exactly does it do to the tone?
I would assume it would cut the treble out a little, and make it quieter, but honestly I just have no clue.

Thanks for your help guys.
ReChord

EDIT: For the record, my question is mainly out of curiosity. If I find a guitar I like then I will get it, but it is just a question I was thinking of while browsing guitars.
Last edited by ReChord at Oct 26, 2008,
#3
try some cutaways and non cutaways and see wether the extra frets are really worth the diminish in tone, yes a cutaway will hurt the tone and volume, and probably sustain too on that matter

personally id have a no cut, because i rarely use the extra frets on my cut freshman
#4
To be honest, cutaways don't take as much away from the tone as people imagine. The bracing near the top makes that part of the guitar very stiff, for one. Secondly, it's one of the farthest points on the body away from the bridge, in most cases. So because of those two things, it really doesn't effect the tone too much.

You probably won't use a cutaway as much as you think either. I can't recall actually needing a cutaway at any point in my year and a half of playing acoustic guitar.

As for volume, it might be a little less, but you won't be able to hear the difference unless you have two of the same models played right next to each other. Even then, you may not be able to tell a difference because each guitar varies in it's sound, volume, etc.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#6
Quote by Confusius
So if you're too lazy to read all of that:


Minimal.

Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#7
What? Lot's of people are that lazy. I almost was, in fact, I only read it to check if you were right or not, so that I could be witty.
#9
Quote by ILoveGuitar07
why would you want a cutaway on an acoustic?

oh wait......here comes ur solo yngwie!!!!


I am going on a trip where me and a friend of mine are going to walk the U.S for a year....we have been planning it for half a year now, and even have our families blessings. But since we are going to be camping it most of the time, and will make a large part of our journey on foot, I will be limited to one acoustic, and that's about it. So I don't have the opportunity to just go "well, lemme just break out the ol' strat."

The cutaway is just so that the songs I play are not limited when the main entertainment for me and my friend is the world, a guitar, and a harmonica.
#10
Quote by ReChord
will make a large part of our journey on foot, I will be limited to one acoustic, and that's about it

Have you walked with an acoustic guitar for any length of time?

Actually - have you walked for any length of time? Everything you carry gets to be a hassle, a harmonica is about the only instrument I'd consider taking on such a trip.

Just trying to get you thinking...
#11
Quote by guitar/bass76
Have you walked with an acoustic guitar for any length of time?

Actually - have you walked for any length of time? Everything you carry gets to be a hassle, a harmonica is about the only instrument I'd consider taking on such a trip.


Yeah, I have thought of the weight as well, which is why I am bringing an acoustic instead of a resonator.

But seriously, all of our other stuff is going to be kept to 18 pounds. So my friend gets 9 pounds, I get 9 pounds, and I get my guitar as well, though it is likely we will switch off some. I realize it will be cumbersome and alot to carry, but since we aren't bringing much else it is going to be our main form of entertainment, and maybe a way of surviving if we play a few street corners. Plus, the old Bluesmen of the day did it, I think I can.
#12
tap the area near the upper bout you will hear it is sonically dead so no worries if your ears are good enough to hear the difference between two in a blind test youll never be happy with any one guitar lol.
#13
Quote by ReChord
Yeah, I have thought of the weight as well, which is why I am bringing an acoustic instead of a resonator.

But seriously, all of our other stuff is going to be kept to 18 pounds. So my friend gets 9 pounds, I get 9 pounds, and I get my guitar as well, though it is likely we will switch off some. I realize it will be cumbersome and alot to carry, but since we aren't bringing much else it is going to be our main form of entertainment, and maybe a way of surviving if we play a few street corners. Plus, the old Bluesmen of the day did it, I think I can.


I'll offer some additional advice, but I don't want to discount the thought you've already put into all this.

My younger brother is 23, in perfect shape and is a recording musician. He just hiked the appalachian trail, which is over 2000 miles. He didn't even bring a digital camera, and ended up shipping his cell phone home, because of the weight. I would second the nominations for a harmonica as the heaviest instrument to bring.

Buttt if you really want to do it whether it's practical or not (you sound like me a few years ago) what about something like a baby taylor or lil' martin? I know you want to have a nice guitar with you, but if you're really going to hike the country this guitar will get dropped, dinged, rained on, etc. etc. etc. etc. You'll wish you hadn't taken a new, expensive guitar on this trip when you get back. After all, it's the indian, not the arrow. :-)

Just my $0.02. Have a great time.

-James
#14
Quote by ReChord
I am going on a trip where me and a friend of mine are going to walk the U.S for a year....we have been planning it for half a year now, and even have our families blessings. But since we are going to be camping it most of the time, and will make a large part of our journey on foot, I will be limited to one acoustic, and that's about it. So I don't have the opportunity to just go "well, lemme just break out the ol' strat."

The cutaway is just so that the songs I play are not limited when the main entertainment for me and my friend is the world, a guitar, and a harmonica.



yeah thats a good point.
I don't blame you for wanting a cutaway, as in that situation, I would as well!

I was trying to be funny, but I fail a lot.
I'm going to become a Comedian.
.
#15
Quote by ILoveGuitar07
yeah thats a good point.
I don't blame you for wanting a cutaway, as in that situation, I would as well!

I was trying to be funny, but I fail a lot.
I'm going to become a Comedian.



Dude, yer gonna starve to death if you do! Best to stick with what your good at, mmmkay.
lol
#16
Quote by Nims
I would second the nominations for a harmonica as the heaviest instrument to bring.

Buttt if you really want to do it whether it's practical or not (you sound like me a few years ago) what about something like a baby taylor or lil' martin? I know you want to have a nice guitar with you, but if you're really going to hike the country this guitar will get dropped, dinged, rained on, etc. etc. etc. etc. You'll wish you hadn't taken a new, expensive guitar on this trip when you get back. After all, it's the indian, not the arrow. :-)


Thanks for the thoughts, and trust me, I have been worried about the weight of the guitar as well, and while I considered just not having one for the trip, I have decided that I really want to bring a guitar with me. I have been reading about the Baby Taylor and the Lil' Martin (my local guitar shop doesn't have one in stock, and the nearest one who has it is a while away, but I am going to go there soon) and the thing is that they don't seem loud. While I don't necessarily need a loud guitar to play for me and my friend's entertainment, there may be a time where we decide to busk or play a street corner, where I will need some volume. Plus it seems like there would be little bass to the sound, which I really like (though tone isn't the biggest of worries, I still want it to sound good.) Now, I still haven't played one, so all i know is what I have read.

From preference, I would love to just drag along a Dreadnought, but I know that they are huge, and it probably won't happen.

And when I say expensive, I mean quality. You see, after all this I will probably keep the guitar forever, or at least a while. I mean, after a trip like this, I am going to want to keep it as a memento of the journey, and I am sure there will be an attachment to it. So I figure a nice guitar (lower priced Martins, which still seem quality made compared to alot of other guitars) would stay playable longer. That said I will probably be anal about keeping it nice for the first month or so on the road, but I expect I will come to deal with the bumps and bruises to it (you ever see that picture of Robert Johnson with his guitar? Thing looks like it was dragged through the seven layers of hell and back....no pun intended for all you blues fans.)

Any thoughts on the Lil' Martin? Perhaps you have a different opinion.
Thanks for having concern for my trip though,
ReChord
Last edited by ReChord at Oct 27, 2008,
#17
You do have other options to guitars than the "standard" all wood variety you know. Have you given any thought to Ovations with the composite backs? Those will surely take a lot more abuse than wood will, and won't be near so effected by the elements. Plus think of that shape, it could serve as a makeshift umbrella of sorts if it get's really bad out.
Then there's the carbon fiber guitars. I've not had any experience with them but since they're made exclusively from the stuff, they're pretty indestructable, and I rekon they sound ok too. It's a shame that plastics haven't progessed enough to give us an all weather proof guitar that sounds like a nice aged Martin or old Gibson.
#18
Carbon fibre guitars are REALLY expensive. $1400 at least. They're definitely indestructible though. Some people have reported putting them through -30 Celsius and then playing them without any problems afterward.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#19
Quote by captivate
Carbon fibre guitars are REALLY expensive. $1400 at least. They're definitely indestructible though. Some people have reported putting them through -30 Celsius and then playing them without any problems afterward.


I wouldn't call $1400 REALLY expensive for a high end guitar. I wouldn't call it expensive at all. The OP makes it sound like he's willing to spend thousands on a guitar...

I just did some quick research and it looks like "CA guitars" is making a travel sized full carbon fiber guitar for $800. IF, and it's a big if, it sounds nice, that's a sweet deal.

-J